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This section contains information about phenomena that are generally believed to have a supernatural, mystical nature, and the very existence of which is currently in doubt.Phenomena Hierarchy

Phenomena

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?-mi’-kuk​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ long limbs tentacles water creature

?-mi’-kuk​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

In Inuit mythology, a sea monster that lives in the waters of the Bering Strait around the city of St. Michael, washing Alaska.

Ä-mi’-kuk is the original spelling of the name.

He attacks kayakers who have sailed far from the shore, and drags them to the bottom with the help of tentacles. It is covered with slime and is able to move easily both under water and ice, and underground (when it breaks through tunnels, lake water goes into the sea, when it returns, the water also returns). ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

The creature has four long tentacles or (in another version) tenacious human arms and legs (or four arms).

A

A-Mi-Cook long limbs tentacles water creature

A-Mi-Cook

In Inuit mythology, a sea monster that lives in the waters of the Bering Strait around the city of St. Michael, washing Alaska.

Ä-mi’-kuk is the original spelling of the name.

He attacks kayakers who have sailed far from the shore, and drags them to the bottom with the help of tentacles. It is covered with slime and is able to move easily both under water and ice, and underground (when it breaks through tunnels, lake water goes into the sea, when it returns, the water also returns). ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

The creature has four long tentacles or (in another version) tenacious human arms and legs (or four arms).

Abumi-guti long limbs tentacles water creature

Abumi-guti

According to Japanese mythology, a creature that appears from a stirrup lost by a warrior (an animated stirrup).

The name Abumi-guti translates from Japanese 鐙口 (Abumi-guchi is transliterated in Latin) - "stirrup-mouth".

A strange furry creature that is born from an old horse stirrup, which belonged to a warrior-rider who died in the war, in the event that comrades-in-arms left the stirrup abandoned on the battlefield. It was believed that it comes to life and waits forever alone for its owner, since the one who fell in battle will not return the same.

There is a version that this character was invented by Toriyama Sekien, who drew his most famous image.

Abumi-kuti long limbs tentacles water creature

Abumi-kuti

According to Japanese mythology, a creature that appears from a stirrup lost by a warrior (an animated stirrup).

The name Abumi-guti translates from Japanese 鐙口 (Abumi-guchi is transliterated in Latin) - "stirrup-mouth".

A strange furry creature that is born from an old horse stirrup, which belonged to a warrior-rider who died in the war, in the event that comrades-in-arms left the stirrup abandoned on the battlefield. It was believed that it comes to life and waits forever alone for its owner, since the one who fell in battle will not return the same.

There is a version that this character was invented by Toriyama Sekien, who drew his most famous image.

Abumiguchi long limbs tentacles water creature

Abumiguchi

According to Japanese mythology, a creature that appears from a stirrup lost by a warrior (an animated stirrup).

The name Abumi-guti translates from Japanese 鐙口 (Abumi-guchi is transliterated in Latin) - "stirrup-mouth".

A strange furry creature that is born from an old horse stirrup, which belonged to a warrior-rider who died in the war, in the event that comrades-in-arms left the stirrup abandoned on the battlefield. It was believed that it comes to life and waits forever alone for its owner, since the one who fell in battle will not return the same.

There is a version that this character was invented by Toriyama Sekien, who drew his most famous image.

Acheri anthropomorphic creature the bare bones of the skeleton the harbinger of death

Acheri

In the folklore of the North Indian region, Kuamon is a spirit in the form of a little girl or a skeleton of a child, descending from the mountains and bringing disease and death.

Akeri anthropomorphic creature the bare bones of the skeleton the harbinger of death

Akeri

In the folklore of the North Indian region, Kuamon is a spirit in the form of a little girl or a skeleton of a child, descending from the mountains and bringing disease and death.

Ancheri anthropomorphic creature the bare bones of the skeleton the harbinger of death

Ancheri

In the folklore of the North Indian region, Kuamon is a spirit in the form of a little girl or a skeleton of a child, descending from the mountains and bringing disease and death.

Adzuki-arai sounds without visible sources

Adzuki-arai

Azuki-arai (あずきあらい - the spelling of the name Adzuki-arai in Japanese and Latin) or Fasolemoyka (小豆洗い - the original Japanese spelling of the name Adzuki-arai and its literal translation).

In Japanese folklore, a demon washing red beans in the river and thereby creating a characteristic rustling knock (the sound comes from the void and can be heard even at a dried-up reservoir).

The spirit can also be entertained also by singing the phrase: "azuki togou ka, hito totte kuou ka? Seki-seki!". ("Am I going to grind Adzuki, or take and devour a person's flesh? Seki-seki!")

According to legend, anyone who gets too close to the place where the song sounds will inevitably fall into the water.

Although adzuki-araya has rarely been seen, since, despite his terrible song, he is a timid and harmless creature, he is often described as a short man with a grotesque appearance: a large balding head, crooked teeth, thin mustache and large bulging yellow eyes. Sometimes it has the appearance of a child, an old man or an old woman of small stature. The spirit wears torn clothes and forever bends over his vessel in which he washes adzuki beans.

According to one version, it may be the restless spirit of the boy.

Adzuki-age sounds without visible sources

Adzuki-age

Azuki-arai (あずきあらい - the spelling of the name Adzuki-arai in Japanese and Latin) or Fasolemoyka (小豆洗い - the original Japanese spelling of the name Adzuki-arai and its literal translation).

In Japanese folklore, a demon washing red beans in the river and thereby creating a characteristic rustling knock (the sound comes from the void and can be heard even at a dried-up reservoir).

The spirit can also be entertained also by singing the phrase: "azuki togou ka, hito totte kuou ka? Seki-seki!". ("Am I going to grind Adzuki, or take and devour a person's flesh? Seki-seki!")

According to legend, anyone who gets too close to the place where the song sounds will inevitably fall into the water.

Although adzuki-araya has rarely been seen, since, despite his terrible song, he is a timid and harmless creature, he is often described as a short man with a grotesque appearance: a large balding head, crooked teeth, thin mustache and large bulging yellow eyes. Sometimes it has the appearance of a child, an old man or an old woman of small stature. The spirit wears torn clothes and forever bends over his vessel in which he washes adzuki beans.

According to one version, it may be the restless spirit of the boy.

Adzuki-gosyagosya sounds without visible sources

Adzuki-gosyagosya

Azuki-arai (あずきあらい - the spelling of the name Adzuki-arai in Japanese and Latin) or Fasolemoyka (小豆洗い - the original Japanese spelling of the name Adzuki-arai and its literal translation).

In Japanese folklore, a demon washing red beans in the river and thereby creating a characteristic rustling knock (the sound comes from the void and can be heard even at a dried-up reservoir).

The spirit can also be entertained also by singing the phrase: "azuki togou ka, hito totte kuou ka? Seki-seki!". ("Am I going to grind Adzuki, or take and devour a person's flesh? Seki-seki!")

According to legend, anyone who gets too close to the place where the song sounds will inevitably fall into the water.

Although adzuki-araya has rarely been seen, since, despite his terrible song, he is a timid and harmless creature, he is often described as a short man with a grotesque appearance: a large balding head, crooked teeth, thin mustache and large bulging yellow eyes. Sometimes it has the appearance of a child, an old man or an old woman of small stature. The spirit wears torn clothes and forever bends over his vessel in which he washes adzuki beans.

According to one version, it may be the restless spirit of the boy.

Adzuki-sarasara sounds without visible sources

Adzuki-sarasara

Azuki-arai (あずきあらい - the spelling of the name Adzuki-arai in Japanese and Latin) or Fasolemoyka (小豆洗い - the original Japanese spelling of the name Adzuki-arai and its literal translation).

In Japanese folklore, a demon washing red beans in the river and thereby creating a characteristic rustling knock (the sound comes from the void and can be heard even at a dried-up reservoir).

The spirit can also be entertained also by singing the phrase: "azuki togou ka, hito totte kuou ka? Seki-seki!". ("Am I going to grind Adzuki, or take and devour a person's flesh? Seki-seki!")

According to legend, anyone who gets too close to the place where the song sounds will inevitably fall into the water.

Although adzuki-araya has rarely been seen, since, despite his terrible song, he is a timid and harmless creature, he is often described as a short man with a grotesque appearance: a large balding head, crooked teeth, thin mustache and large bulging yellow eyes. Sometimes it has the appearance of a child, an old man or an old woman of small stature. The spirit wears torn clothes and forever bends over his vessel in which he washes adzuki beans.

According to one version, it may be the restless spirit of the boy.

Adzuki-sogi sounds without visible sources

Adzuki-sogi

Azuki-arai (あずきあらい - the spelling of the name Adzuki-arai in Japanese and Latin) or Fasolemoyka (小豆洗い - the original Japanese spelling of the name Adzuki-arai and its literal translation).

In Japanese folklore, a demon washing red beans in the river and thereby creating a characteristic rustling knock (the sound comes from the void and can be heard even at a dried-up reservoir).

The spirit can also be entertained also by singing the phrase: "azuki togou ka, hito totte kuou ka? Seki-seki!". ("Am I going to grind Adzuki, or take and devour a person's flesh? Seki-seki!")

According to legend, anyone who gets too close to the place where the song sounds will inevitably fall into the water.

Although adzuki-araya has rarely been seen, since, despite his terrible song, he is a timid and harmless creature, he is often described as a short man with a grotesque appearance: a large balding head, crooked teeth, thin mustache and large bulging yellow eyes. Sometimes it has the appearance of a child, an old man or an old woman of small stature. The spirit wears torn clothes and forever bends over his vessel in which he washes adzuki beans.

According to one version, it may be the restless spirit of the boy.

Adzuki-togi sounds without visible sources

Adzuki-togi

Azuki-arai (あずきあらい - the spelling of the name Adzuki-arai in Japanese and Latin) or Fasolemoyka (小豆洗い - the original Japanese spelling of the name Adzuki-arai and its literal translation).

In Japanese folklore, a demon washing red beans in the river and thereby creating a characteristic rustling knock (the sound comes from the void and can be heard even at a dried-up reservoir).

The spirit can also be entertained also by singing the phrase: "azuki togou ka, hito totte kuou ka? Seki-seki!". ("Am I going to grind Adzuki, or take and devour a person's flesh? Seki-seki!")

According to legend, anyone who gets too close to the place where the song sounds will inevitably fall into the water.

Although adzuki-araya has rarely been seen, since, despite his terrible song, he is a timid and harmless creature, he is often described as a short man with a grotesque appearance: a large balding head, crooked teeth, thin mustache and large bulging yellow eyes. Sometimes it has the appearance of a child, an old man or an old woman of small stature. The spirit wears torn clothes and forever bends over his vessel in which he washes adzuki beans.

According to one version, it may be the restless spirit of the boy.

Adzuki-yaroo sounds without visible sources

Adzuki-yaroo

Azuki-arai (あずきあらい - the spelling of the name Adzuki-arai in Japanese and Latin) or Fasolemoyka (小豆洗い - the original Japanese spelling of the name Adzuki-arai and its literal translation).

In Japanese folklore, a demon washing red beans in the river and thereby creating a characteristic rustling knock (the sound comes from the void and can be heard even at a dried-up reservoir).

The spirit can also be entertained also by singing the phrase: "azuki togou ka, hito totte kuou ka? Seki-seki!". ("Am I going to grind Adzuki, or take and devour a person's flesh? Seki-seki!")

According to legend, anyone who gets too close to the place where the song sounds will inevitably fall into the water.

Although adzuki-araya has rarely been seen, since, despite his terrible song, he is a timid and harmless creature, he is often described as a short man with a grotesque appearance: a large balding head, crooked teeth, thin mustache and large bulging yellow eyes. Sometimes it has the appearance of a child, an old man or an old woman of small stature. The spirit wears torn clothes and forever bends over his vessel in which he washes adzuki beans.

According to one version, it may be the restless spirit of the boy.

Agach-Kishi anthropomorphic creature hairy creature

Agach-Kishi

Agach kishi (Ağac kişi is the original Azerbaijani spelling of the name, literally "tree man"). Sometimes he is called Mesha-adam, which translates literally "forest man".

A creature from Balkar and Azerbaijani mythology. Lives in mountain forests. He usually looks like a hairy creature, having an intermediate appearance between a monkey and a man, having an unpleasant smell.

It was believed that at night he came to people's gardens and vegetable gardens, putting on clothes thrown away by people. The creature is afraid of dogs.

 

According to some researchers, the image of Agach Kishi is a variant of the legend of the bigfoot.

Agach kishi anthropomorphic creature hairy creature

Agach kishi

Agach kishi (Ağac kişi is the original Azerbaijani spelling of the name, literally "tree man"). Sometimes he is called Mesha-adam, which translates literally "forest man".

A creature from Balkar and Azerbaijani mythology. Lives in mountain forests. He usually looks like a hairy creature, having an intermediate appearance between a monkey and a man, having an unpleasant smell.

It was believed that at night he came to people's gardens and vegetable gardens, putting on clothes thrown away by people. The creature is afraid of dogs.

 

According to some researchers, the image of Agach Kishi is a variant of the legend of the bigfoot.

Agropelter anthropomorphic creature hairy creature superpowered creature

Agropelter

Agropelter is the original English spelling.

Anthrocephalus craniofractens is a variant of the pseudoscientific Latin name, literally "human—headed skull"

Brachviipotentes crainiofractans is another variant of the pseudoscientific Latin name.

Sitting in the trunk of a tree, the creature seems to be waiting for an unwary person and throws chips, twigs and branches at the uninvited guest. According to some descriptions, this creature moves so fast that it is impossible to notice it. His cubs are always born on February 29 and always in odd numbers.

In the folklore of the American colonists, an aggressive ape-like creature that lives in the hollow trunks of dry trees. It is described as completely black, except for the muzzle, which looks like an ash-gray skull is painted on it (judging by this description, it can be assumed that this is a spectacled bear that lives in South America).

Aguane anthropomorphic creature water creature

Aguane

Spirits are the patrons of alpine meadows and mountain springs from Celtic mythology. They were also mentioned in medieval European (in particular Italian) folklore.

Aguans wander through alpine meadows, swim in rivers and lakes and protect the purity of the water. They look like tall, beautiful women with long, loose hair.

People are friendly to people, but if a person muddies the water in a mountain spring, then they can drag a person under the water or lure him into caves and devour him there. The same punishment is reserved for rapists, because the Aguans do not forgive the abuse of women.

Sometimes they come to crowded places to talk and even help with homework. As a rule, they appear to people in the guise of ugly old women with goat hooves or feet turned backwards.

Ahlis disproportionate body

Ahlis

In Roman mythology, this is a rather strange Scandinavian animal resembling an elk, but with stiff legs and a huge upper lip, because of which he can only walk backwards.

He lives in the Hercynian Forest (this is more the name of the edge of the known world in the north than the real forest. This name denoted a huge wooded area extending from the Rhine to the north and east almost to infinity, and in reality — approximately to the Carpathians).

Achlis disproportionate body

Achlis

In Roman mythology, this is a rather strange Scandinavian animal resembling an elk, but with stiff legs and a huge upper lip, because of which he can only walk backwards.

He lives in the Hercynian Forest (this is more the name of the edge of the known world in the north than the real forest. This name denoted a huge wooded area extending from the Rhine to the north and east almost to infinity, and in reality — approximately to the Carpathians).

Aigamuchab anthropomorphic creature

Aigamuchab

In the folklore of the Hottentots from Kalahari (Namibia), these are humanoid creatures with eyes on their feet that tear people to pieces.

There is a variant name Aigamuchab or Aigamuxa.

Aigamuxa anthropomorphic creature

Aigamuxa

In the folklore of the Hottentots from Kalahari (Namibia), these are humanoid creatures with eyes on their feet that tear people to pieces.

There is a variant name Aigamuchab or Aigamuxa.

Aigamuxab anthropomorphic creature

Aigamuxab

In the folklore of the Hottentots from Kalahari (Namibia), these are humanoid creatures with eyes on their feet that tear people to pieces.

There is a variant name Aigamuchab or Aigamuxa.

Aigamuxas anthropomorphic creature

Aigamuxas

In the folklore of the Hottentots from Kalahari (Namibia), these are humanoid creatures with eyes on their feet that tear people to pieces.

There is a variant name Aigamuchab or Aigamuxa.

Aigamucha anthropomorphic creature

Aigamucha

In the folklore of the Hottentots from Kalahari (Namibia), these are humanoid creatures with eyes on their feet that tear people to pieces.

There is a variant name Aigamuchab or Aigamuxa.

Aitvaras choking victim fireball flying creature sexual relations with the victim specifies the location of the treasure

Aitvaras

In Lithuanian mythology, a flying spirit in the form of a fiery serpent, a dragon, sometimes a black crow, a heron, a black or fiery rooster, less often a cat.

He flies over the trees, leaving a trail of fire. It can indicate where the treasure is buried, falling on this place in the form of a star. He can come to women and strangle them at night. Can engage in sexual intercourse with them as an incubus.

According to one version , the word Aitvaras comes from the Lithuanian aiti — tramp, shifty, tomboy and varas — very fast movement. According to another version, the name is associated with the word aitauti — quiet, calm, but this version is less common. The etymology can also be related to the Iranian pativara, as well as the Polish poczwara — an evil spirit, a nightmare.

 

Altvixas choking victim fireball flying creature sexual relations with the victim specifies the location of the treasure

Altvixas

In Lithuanian mythology, a flying spirit in the form of a fiery serpent, a dragon, sometimes a black crow, a heron, a black or fiery rooster, less often a cat.

He flies over the trees, leaving a trail of fire. It can indicate where the treasure is buried, falling on this place in the form of a star. He can come to women and strangle them at night. Can engage in sexual intercourse with them as an incubus.

According to one version , the word Aitvaras comes from the Lithuanian aiti — tramp, shifty, tomboy and varas — very fast movement. According to another version, the name is associated with the word aitauti — quiet, calm, but this version is less common. The etymology can also be related to the Iranian pativara, as well as the Polish poczwara — an evil spirit, a nightmare.

 

Atvaras choking victim fireball flying creature sexual relations with the victim specifies the location of the treasure

Atvaras

In Lithuanian mythology, a flying spirit in the form of a fiery serpent, a dragon, sometimes a black crow, a heron, a black or fiery rooster, less often a cat.

He flies over the trees, leaving a trail of fire. It can indicate where the treasure is buried, falling on this place in the form of a star. He can come to women and strangle them at night. Can engage in sexual intercourse with them as an incubus.

According to one version , the word Aitvaras comes from the Lithuanian aiti — tramp, shifty, tomboy and varas — very fast movement. According to another version, the name is associated with the word aitauti — quiet, calm, but this version is less common. The etymology can also be related to the Iranian pativara, as well as the Polish poczwara — an evil spirit, a nightmare.

 

Aitvar choking victim fireball flying creature sexual relations with the victim specifies the location of the treasure

Aitvar

In Lithuanian mythology, a flying spirit in the form of a fiery serpent, a dragon, sometimes a black crow, a heron, a black or fiery rooster, less often a cat.

He flies over the trees, leaving a trail of fire. It can indicate where the treasure is buried, falling on this place in the form of a star. He can come to women and strangle them at night. Can engage in sexual intercourse with them as an incubus.

According to one version , the word Aitvaras comes from the Lithuanian aiti — tramp, shifty, tomboy and varas — very fast movement. According to another version, the name is associated with the word aitauti — quiet, calm, but this version is less common. The etymology can also be related to the Iranian pativara, as well as the Polish poczwara — an evil spirit, a nightmare.

 

Ajina anthropomorphic creature high being large creature turns into an animal

Ajina

In the mythologies of Tajiks, Uzbeks, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Turkmens, and partly Kazakhs, Ajina or Ajinna (Uzbek Ajina / Ajina; Turkm. Ajina; taj. Aҷinna / aججنه) - an evil spirit.

Appearance varies from place to place. For some, she looks like a scary humanoid creature, for others like a scary virgin, a scary baby, a long-haired old woman, a kid with horns and red eyes, etc. Most often appears in the image of a woman suddenly increasing in size and turning into a giantess, or in the form of various animals, for example, a goat (in the guise of a goat, he frightens by suddenly uttering obscenity in a human voice). 

It usually lives in piles of ash thrown out of the hearth, but it also occurs in abandoned and sparsely populated places, in destroyed and abandoned residential buildings, in dense and dark forests, in uninhabited meadows and steppes, in basements and attics of residential buildings. They even appear in the rooms of residential buildings at night, scaring people.

Among Turkmens, Turks and other Turkic—speaking peoples, the jinn usually has the functions of ajina (the Turks also have the demon mekir).​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Ajinna anthropomorphic creature high being large creature turns into an animal

Ajinna

In the mythologies of Tajiks, Uzbeks, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Turkmens, and partly Kazakhs, Ajina or Ajinna (Uzbek Ajina / Ajina; Turkm. Ajina; taj. Aҷinna / aججنه) - an evil spirit.

Appearance varies from place to place. For some, she looks like a scary humanoid creature, for others like a scary virgin, a scary baby, a long-haired old woman, a kid with horns and red eyes, etc. Most often appears in the image of a woman suddenly increasing in size and turning into a giantess, or in the form of various animals, for example, a goat (in the guise of a goat, he frightens by suddenly uttering obscenity in a human voice). 

It usually lives in piles of ash thrown out of the hearth, but it also occurs in abandoned and sparsely populated places, in destroyed and abandoned residential buildings, in dense and dark forests, in uninhabited meadows and steppes, in basements and attics of residential buildings. They even appear in the rooms of residential buildings at night, scaring people.

Among Turkmens, Turks and other Turkic—speaking peoples, the jinn usually has the functions of ajina (the Turks also have the demon mekir).​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Akashita a separate part of the body hairy creature

Akashita

Akashita (赤舌, Aka-shita) literally translates from Japanese as "red tongue".

In Japanese folklore, a demon taking the form of a dark cloud with clawed paws and a terrible, hairy muzzle. He has a long red tongue in a wide mouth. Akashita brings bad luck and harm with it. He attacks those who stole water from neighbors (first he drinks all the water from their field, and then grabs them with his long red tongue). 

Akashita appears in the summer months, when rains are vital for a good harvest.

In the esoteric direction Ommedo, Akashita was one of the six spirits of the Japanese calendar (赤口, "red mouth"). It was associated with sakuzetsu-jin (赤舌神), who guarded the western gate of Jupiter and sakuzetsu-niti (赤舌日) — the day of bad luck and pestilence.

Akadzita a separate part of the body hairy creature

Akadzita

Akashita (赤舌, Aka-shita) literally translates from Japanese as "red tongue".

In Japanese folklore, a demon taking the form of a dark cloud with clawed paws and a terrible, hairy muzzle. He has a long red tongue in a wide mouth. Akashita brings bad luck and harm with it. He attacks those who stole water from neighbors (first he drinks all the water from their field, and then grabs them with his long red tongue). 

Akashita appears in the summer months, when rains are vital for a good harvest.

In the esoteric direction Ommedo, Akashita was one of the six spirits of the Japanese calendar (赤口, "red mouth"). It was associated with sakuzetsu-jin (赤舌神), who guarded the western gate of Jupiter and sakuzetsu-niti (赤舌日) — the day of bad luck and pestilence.

Aku-aku changes form excessive thinness helps superpowered creature

Aku-aku

The guardian spirit of Rapanui families in the mythology of Easter Island. They have a rather thin build, while they are incredibly strong. They are able to take the form of any object of living and inanimate nature.

Aku-Aku live in inaccessible places of the island and from time to time are shown to residents in the form of various animals, carrying good or bad omens.

Sometimes these spirits choose a family and become its protectors, fulfilling all the wishes of family members. With people who have unkind feelings towards this family, Aku-Aku behave aggressively and vindictively.

It is believed that they are involved in the installation of moai (stone statues on Easter Island).

Akuaku changes form excessive thinness helps superpowered creature

Akuaku

The guardian spirit of Rapanui families in the mythology of Easter Island. They have a rather thin build, while they are incredibly strong. They are able to take the form of any object of living and inanimate nature.

Aku-Aku live in inaccessible places of the island and from time to time are shown to residents in the form of various animals, carrying good or bad omens.

Sometimes these spirits choose a family and become its protectors, fulfilling all the wishes of family members. With people who have unkind feelings towards this family, Aku-Aku behave aggressively and vindictively.

It is believed that they are involved in the installation of moai (stone statues on Easter Island).

Albasta anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Albasta

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Albasts anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Albasts

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Alvasti anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Alvasti

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Almasts anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Almasts

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Alpastă anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Alpastă

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Albys anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Albys

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Alvasty anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Alvasty

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Albass anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Albass

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Albasly anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Albasly

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Albasly katyn anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Albasly katyn

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Al-ana anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Al-ana

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Al-qara anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Al-qara

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Al-kuzy anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Al-kuzy

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Ama-biko animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fish tail scales the glowing areas of the body water creature

Ama-biko

According to Japanese beliefs, a half-man is a half-fish with a bird's beak that appears in the sea and predicts the future. From afar at night it looks like strange lights on the water. It is believed that he looks like a mermaid or a newt with three legs.

Similar or identical to Amabie.

Ama-biko-nyudo animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fish tail scales the glowing areas of the body water creature

Ama-biko-nyudo

According to Japanese beliefs, a half-man is a half-fish with a bird's beak that appears in the sea and predicts the future. From afar at night it looks like strange lights on the water. It is believed that he looks like a mermaid or a newt with three legs.

Similar or identical to Amabie.

Amabie animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fish tail scales the glowing areas of the body water creature

Amabie

According to Japanese beliefs, a half-man is a half-fish with a bird's beak that appears in the sea and predicts the future. From afar at night it looks like strange lights on the water. It is believed that he looks like a mermaid or a newt with three legs.

Similar or identical to Amabie.

Amahiko animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fish tail scales the glowing areas of the body water creature

Amahiko

According to Japanese beliefs, a half-man is a half-fish with a bird's beak that appears in the sea and predicts the future. From afar at night it looks like strange lights on the water. It is believed that he looks like a mermaid or a newt with three legs.

Similar or identical to Amabie.

Arie animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fish tail scales the glowing areas of the body water creature

Arie

According to Japanese beliefs, a half-man is a half-fish with a bird's beak that appears in the sea and predicts the future. From afar at night it looks like strange lights on the water. It is believed that he looks like a mermaid or a newt with three legs.

Similar or identical to Amabie.

Amabie animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fish tail scales the glowing areas of the body water creature

Amabie

In Japanese mythology, a mermaid-like three-legged creature with a beak, combining human and fish features. He has long hair and a scaly body. As well as a beak-shaped mouth and three legs. It glows with a bright light that can be seen from the coast.

In addition to the well-known Amabie, there are other variants of the name of this youkai. For example, his name may be Amahiko (я, "bhikkhu monk"), Umihiko ( 海, "sea boy"), Tempiko ( 天, "child of Heaven"), Tempiko ( 天, heavenly boy), Amahiko ( 尼彦入, amahiko nude:before:, "a monk entering a monastery") or Arie (я ア)). All these youkai are usually depicted as ape-like, bird-like, or cephalopod mermaids with three legs.

It is believed that Amabie originated from ningyo, the Japanese version of the mermaid, whose name is first mentioned in the chronicle "Nihon seki". In Nihon seki it is written that in the area corresponding to the modern prefecture Osaka, in 619, a fisherman caught something "like a child", it was neither a fish nor a person, and his name was unknown.

Ningyo could be a sign of future prosperity or, conversely, interpreted as an omen of an impending catastrophe, such as a typhoon, earthquake or tsunami. In any case, it was believed that the Ningyo possessed great power. One well-known belief was that eating ningyo meat brought a long life. Sometimes even one glance at ning was considered luck.

It is believed that Amabie can come out of the sea and predict abundant harvests or epidemics.

Similar or identical to Ama-biko.

Amahiko animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fish tail scales the glowing areas of the body water creature

Amahiko

In Japanese mythology, a mermaid-like three-legged creature with a beak, combining human and fish features. He has long hair and a scaly body. As well as a beak-shaped mouth and three legs. It glows with a bright light that can be seen from the coast.

In addition to the well-known Amabie, there are other variants of the name of this youkai. For example, his name may be Amahiko (я, "bhikkhu monk"), Umihiko ( 海, "sea boy"), Tempiko ( 天, "child of Heaven"), Tempiko ( 天, heavenly boy), Amahiko ( 尼彦入, amahiko nude:before:, "a monk entering a monastery") or Arie (я ア)). All these youkai are usually depicted as ape-like, bird-like, or cephalopod mermaids with three legs.

It is believed that Amabie originated from ningyo, the Japanese version of the mermaid, whose name is first mentioned in the chronicle "Nihon seki". In Nihon seki it is written that in the area corresponding to the modern prefecture Osaka, in 619, a fisherman caught something "like a child", it was neither a fish nor a person, and his name was unknown.

Ningyo could be a sign of future prosperity or, conversely, interpreted as an omen of an impending catastrophe, such as a typhoon, earthquake or tsunami. In any case, it was believed that the Ningyo possessed great power. One well-known belief was that eating ningyo meat brought a long life. Sometimes even one glance at ning was considered luck.

It is believed that Amabie can come out of the sea and predict abundant harvests or epidemics.

Similar or identical to Ama-biko.

Arie animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fish tail scales the glowing areas of the body water creature

Arie

In Japanese mythology, a mermaid-like three-legged creature with a beak, combining human and fish features. He has long hair and a scaly body. As well as a beak-shaped mouth and three legs. It glows with a bright light that can be seen from the coast.

In addition to the well-known Amabie, there are other variants of the name of this youkai. For example, his name may be Amahiko (я, "bhikkhu monk"), Umihiko ( 海, "sea boy"), Tempiko ( 天, "child of Heaven"), Tempiko ( 天, heavenly boy), Amahiko ( 尼彦入, amahiko nude:before:, "a monk entering a monastery") or Arie (я ア)). All these youkai are usually depicted as ape-like, bird-like, or cephalopod mermaids with three legs.

It is believed that Amabie originated from ningyo, the Japanese version of the mermaid, whose name is first mentioned in the chronicle "Nihon seki". In Nihon seki it is written that in the area corresponding to the modern prefecture Osaka, in 619, a fisherman caught something "like a child", it was neither a fish nor a person, and his name was unknown.

Ningyo could be a sign of future prosperity or, conversely, interpreted as an omen of an impending catastrophe, such as a typhoon, earthquake or tsunami. In any case, it was believed that the Ningyo possessed great power. One well-known belief was that eating ningyo meat brought a long life. Sometimes even one glance at ning was considered luck.

It is believed that Amabie can come out of the sea and predict abundant harvests or epidemics.

Similar or identical to Ama-biko.

Amalanhig anthropomorphic creature living dead the bare bones of the skeleton

Amalanhig

A creature from the folklore of the Visayas (especially among the Hiligaino-speaking groups). Amalanhig literally translates as "hard" (it is believed that amalanhig have stiff legs that cannot bend).

These are half-dead, half-decomposed corpses that can only move in a straight line. They slowly and methodically pursue their victim, and when they overtake her, they can tickle her to imminent death from fear and laughter. You can escape from them by zigzagging or by water (they are afraid of deep reservoirs). You can also escape from them by climbing a tree or any high platform.

They have no specific motive other than harming others.

It is believed that Amalanhig are Aswangs who failed to fully preserve their magical power after death, or victims of Aswang vampires. Having risen from the grave, these amalankhigs hide in the forest. At night they go to nearby villages to hunt the inhabitants and drink blood with their pointed tongue.

According to another version, these are people who died with unfinished business or those who were killed and returned to take revenge.

They are also able to imitate the words of the people they encounter. Their presence is usually determined by the stench of their rotting flesh. 

Amaranhig anthropomorphic creature living dead the bare bones of the skeleton

Amaranhig

A creature from the folklore of the Visayas (especially among the Hiligaino-speaking groups). Amalanhig literally translates as "hard" (it is believed that amalanhig have stiff legs that cannot bend).

These are half-dead, half-decomposed corpses that can only move in a straight line. They slowly and methodically pursue their victim, and when they overtake her, they can tickle her to imminent death from fear and laughter. You can escape from them by zigzagging or by water (they are afraid of deep reservoirs). You can also escape from them by climbing a tree or any high platform.

They have no specific motive other than harming others.

It is believed that Amalanhig are Aswangs who failed to fully preserve their magical power after death, or victims of Aswang vampires. Having risen from the grave, these amalankhigs hide in the forest. At night they go to nearby villages to hunt the inhabitants and drink blood with their pointed tongue.

According to another version, these are people who died with unfinished business or those who were killed and returned to take revenge.

They are also able to imitate the words of the people they encounter. Their presence is usually determined by the stench of their rotting flesh. 

Amanojaku circumstance perception predicts the future the little creature

Amanojaku

Amanojaku (あまのじゃく - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku syllabic alphabet-kana, 天 — - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku hieroglyphs-kanji) - "literally heavenly evil spirit".

In Japanese mythology, a small but extremely malicious demon capable of reading people's minds and predicting the future. Pushes people to do bad things. It is usually depicted as a kind of small devil-they (large evil fanged and horned humanoid demons with red, blue or black skin).

It is generally believed that the image of amanojaku comes from Amanosagume (天)), an evil goddess in Shinto myths, who shares the quality of the character of amanojaku to do contrary to what is said and his ability to read a person's heart.

Ama no zaku circumstance perception predicts the future the little creature

Ama no zaku

Amanojaku (あまのじゃく - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku syllabic alphabet-kana, 天 — - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku hieroglyphs-kanji) - "literally heavenly evil spirit".

In Japanese mythology, a small but extremely malicious demon capable of reading people's minds and predicting the future. Pushes people to do bad things. It is usually depicted as a kind of small devil-they (large evil fanged and horned humanoid demons with red, blue or black skin).

It is generally believed that the image of amanojaku comes from Amanosagume (天)), an evil goddess in Shinto myths, who shares the quality of the character of amanojaku to do contrary to what is said and his ability to read a person's heart.

Ama no jyaku circumstance perception predicts the future the little creature

Ama no jyaku

Amanojaku (あまのじゃく - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku syllabic alphabet-kana, 天 — - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku hieroglyphs-kanji) - "literally heavenly evil spirit".

In Japanese mythology, a small but extremely malicious demon capable of reading people's minds and predicting the future. Pushes people to do bad things. It is usually depicted as a kind of small devil-they (large evil fanged and horned humanoid demons with red, blue or black skin).

It is generally believed that the image of amanojaku comes from Amanosagume (天)), an evil goddess in Shinto myths, who shares the quality of the character of amanojaku to do contrary to what is said and his ability to read a person's heart.

Amanjaku circumstance perception predicts the future the little creature

Amanjaku

Amanojaku (あまのじゃく - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku syllabic alphabet-kana, 天 — - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku hieroglyphs-kanji) - "literally heavenly evil spirit".

In Japanese mythology, a small but extremely malicious demon capable of reading people's minds and predicting the future. Pushes people to do bad things. It is usually depicted as a kind of small devil-they (large evil fanged and horned humanoid demons with red, blue or black skin).

It is generally believed that the image of amanojaku comes from Amanosagume (天)), an evil goddess in Shinto myths, who shares the quality of the character of amanojaku to do contrary to what is said and his ability to read a person's heart.

Amanojaku circumstance perception predicts the future the little creature

Amanojaku

Amanojaku (あまのじゃく - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku syllabic alphabet-kana, 天 — - the original spelling of the name Amanojaku hieroglyphs-kanji) - "literally heavenly evil spirit".

In Japanese mythology, a small but extremely malicious demon capable of reading people's minds and predicting the future. Pushes people to do bad things. It is usually depicted as a kind of small devil-they (large evil fanged and horned humanoid demons with red, blue or black skin).

It is generally believed that the image of amanojaku comes from Amanosagume (天)), an evil goddess in Shinto myths, who shares the quality of the character of amanojaku to do contrary to what is said and his ability to read a person's heart.

Amayuryuk anthropomorphic creature large creature

Amayuryuk

In the folklore of the Canadian Inuit, amayuryuk is a giant woman with a pocket on her back, smelling of rotten algae, where she puts her children.

Latin spellings vary: Amajaruk, Amajorssuk, Amajurjuk, Amautalik, Amayuquq.

It is believed that when meeting with amayuryuk, one can neither run away from her, nor go to meet her. A person who does this can get very sick or even die. ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Amautalik anthropomorphic creature large creature

Amautalik

In the folklore of the Canadian Inuit, amayuryuk is a giant woman with a pocket on her back, smelling of rotten algae, where she puts her children.

Latin spellings vary: Amajaruk, Amajorssuk, Amajurjuk, Amautalik, Amayuquq.

It is believed that when meeting with amayuryuk, one can neither run away from her, nor go to meet her. A person who does this can get very sick or even die. ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

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Amt animal body parts

Amt

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Am-am animal body parts

Am-am

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Am-mit animal body parts

Am-mit

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Am-mut animal body parts

Am-mut

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Amam animal body parts

Amam

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Amamat animal body parts

Amamat

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Amemite animal body parts

Amemite

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Ammat animal body parts

Ammat

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Angel Hair an unknown substance destroyed by touching flying object white gelatinous mass

Angel Hair

"Angel hair" is called a spider-like, cotton-like or gelatinous mass, which sometimes falls to the ground in the form of threads or bundles, and after a few hours evaporates. (In the hands, the "hair" melts or turns into foul-smelling lumps). In Italy they are known as "silicon wool", in France "Madonna's gift". Regardless of the name, their appearance is traditionally associated with UFOs. 

It is believed that the first mention of them can be found in the papyrus of the time of Pharaoh Thutmose III, which is kept in the collection of the director of the Egyptian department of the Vatican Museum and describes the following phenomenon:

"In the twenty-second year, in the third month of winter, at 6 o'clock in the afternoon, the scribes of the House of Life saw a moving circle of fire in the sky. Its dimensions were an elbow in length and an elbow in width. They prostrated themselves and reported to the Pharaoh, and he thought about this event. After a few days, these objects in the sky became numerous and shone brighter than the sun. And Pharaoh, along with the army, looked at them. By evening, the fire circles rose higher and moved towards the south… A volatile substance fell from the sky… This has not happened since the foundation of the Earth… And Pharaoh burned incense to the gods and commanded them to record what happened in the annals of the House of Life." 


Later mentions include an observation from November 16, 1857, Charleston, USA. At night, bright "comets" scurried over the city, and in the morning there were cobwebs everywhere, but only without spiders. And in 1881, in Milwaukee, USA, the sky turned out to be completely covered with angelic hair, which made an indelible impression on the locals. The information got into the Scientific American magazine.

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"Angel Hair"

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"Angel hair" under the microscope


They were directly associated with UFOs in October 1954. On October 27, Gennaro Lucetti and Pietro Lastrucci sat on the balcony of a hotel in St. Mark's Square in Venice, Italy. At the same time, they noticed two spindle-shaped objects that, rotating, floated across the sky. Behind them were traces like white flames. The objects moved across the sky at high speed, made a smooth 180-degree turn and disappeared over the horizon. A few minutes later, participants and spectators of a football match in Florence were able to observe the UFO. At the same time, in addition to the teams and judges, about 10 thousand spectators, as well as journalists, were present at the stadium. The match had to be interrupted because everyone's attention was focused on the flying "cigars". But even then it was not possible to resume the game – it turned out that the entire football field was covered with a transparent sticky web.

According to external signs, angel's hair is similar to ectoplasm.

Among the attempts to explain the phenomenon , the following hypotheses can be distinguished:

  • American ufologist Charles Mainey suggested that the "angel's hair" is the material result of the work of UFO engines, ejected outside like exhaust gases of internal combustion engines. He explains the rapid evaporation of the residues by the fact that such a substance is very unstable in our reality and disappears, moving to a more familiar space-time for it.
  • Other ufologies have suggested that the heavenly web is a materialization of some spiritual forces, like ectoplasm that appears during spiritualistic seances.
  • In 2001, Nikolai Subbotin, director of the Russian Ufological Research Station RUFORS, coined the term "chemtrails", which was a literal translation of a similar foreign concept "chemtrail". He suggested that this substance is formed after flights in the atmosphere of aircraft of a certain design as a result of their spraying of certain chemicals.
  • Entomologists claim that there is no mystery, and this fibrous substance is just a mass of broken cobwebs carried by the wind. In support of their theory, they cite the example of tiny lineages, which, although they do not have wings, are able to cross through the air in a rather original way. The spider simply unfolds its body in the wind and releases a long thin thread from the back. As soon as the wind lifts the thread into the air, the spider grabs it tightly and thus overcomes quite decent distances.

However, none of these hypotheses can be considered strictly scientific: the first two explain the phenomenon through things that have not been scientifically proven, the existence of "chemotrasses" described by N. Subbotin has also not been proven. The entomological hypothesis has not yet found practical confirmation.

Angiac anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood restless spirit turns into an animal

Angiac

Angiac literally translates to "living dead child".

In the beliefs of the Eskimos of Alaska, the vengeful spirit of a newborn child abandoned to die, returning to drink the blood of his living relatives.

He took revenge first of all on the elders, because during the hungry years it often happens that the elders of the tribe are forced to get rid of extra mouths. They get rid of babies, because it is believed that a small child does not yet belong completely to our world. The elders take the child and leave him to starve to death in the snow.

And until the tribe changes camp, they will be haunted by the ghost of this child. The only way to prevent the appearance of an angiac is not to give the child a name: after all, only a name gives a person a soul.

Every night he will suck his mother's breast, gaining strength to take revenge on the elders. Having gained enough strength, he gets the ability to transform into various wild animals, in the guise of which he will kill members of his family.

He can also attack random passers-by. When a traveler walks or rides, usually on dogs, through a snowy desert, he can hear sounds foreshadowing the appearance of a monster. This is the crying of a child, quickly fading away in a blizzard, and the hooting of a polar white owl. At this time, you can still escape from the angiac if you turn back in time and have time to leave its territory. If a person continues on his way due to inexperience, very soon he sees a white owl flying over him, and almost instantly he is attacked by an angiac. He can appear either in the form of a small man overgrown with shaggy brown fur, with long curved claws and sharp teeth, or a giant owl. Sometimes - in the form of a child turned white from the cold. The older the angiac, the stronger.

Angeuk anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood restless spirit turns into an animal

Angeuk

Angiac literally translates to "living dead child".

In the beliefs of the Eskimos of Alaska, the vengeful spirit of a newborn child abandoned to die, returning to drink the blood of his living relatives.

He took revenge first of all on the elders, because during the hungry years it often happens that the elders of the tribe are forced to get rid of extra mouths. They get rid of babies, because it is believed that a small child does not yet belong completely to our world. The elders take the child and leave him to starve to death in the snow.

And until the tribe changes camp, they will be haunted by the ghost of this child. The only way to prevent the appearance of an angiac is not to give the child a name: after all, only a name gives a person a soul.

Every night he will suck his mother's breast, gaining strength to take revenge on the elders. Having gained enough strength, he gets the ability to transform into various wild animals, in the guise of which he will kill members of his family.

He can also attack random passers-by. When a traveler walks or rides, usually on dogs, through a snowy desert, he can hear sounds foreshadowing the appearance of a monster. This is the crying of a child, quickly fading away in a blizzard, and the hooting of a polar white owl. At this time, you can still escape from the angiac if you turn back in time and have time to leave its territory. If a person continues on his way due to inexperience, very soon he sees a white owl flying over him, and almost instantly he is attacked by an angiac. He can appear either in the form of a small man overgrown with shaggy brown fur, with long curved claws and sharp teeth, or a giant owl. Sometimes - in the form of a child turned white from the cold. The older the angiac, the stronger.

Angyak anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood restless spirit turns into an animal

Angyak

Angiac literally translates to "living dead child".

In the beliefs of the Eskimos of Alaska, the vengeful spirit of a newborn child abandoned to die, returning to drink the blood of his living relatives.

He took revenge first of all on the elders, because during the hungry years it often happens that the elders of the tribe are forced to get rid of extra mouths. They get rid of babies, because it is believed that a small child does not yet belong completely to our world. The elders take the child and leave him to starve to death in the snow.

And until the tribe changes camp, they will be haunted by the ghost of this child. The only way to prevent the appearance of an angiac is not to give the child a name: after all, only a name gives a person a soul.

Every night he will suck his mother's breast, gaining strength to take revenge on the elders. Having gained enough strength, he gets the ability to transform into various wild animals, in the guise of which he will kill members of his family.

He can also attack random passers-by. When a traveler walks or rides, usually on dogs, through a snowy desert, he can hear sounds foreshadowing the appearance of a monster. This is the crying of a child, quickly fading away in a blizzard, and the hooting of a polar white owl. At this time, you can still escape from the angiac if you turn back in time and have time to leave its territory. If a person continues on his way due to inexperience, very soon he sees a white owl flying over him, and almost instantly he is attacked by an angiac. He can appear either in the form of a small man overgrown with shaggy brown fur, with long curved claws and sharp teeth, or a giant owl. Sometimes - in the form of a child turned white from the cold. The older the angiac, the stronger.

Anki-Kiele hairy creature water creature

Anki-Kiele

The spirit of the sea from Chukchi and Eskimo mythology. It has a huge shaggy head with two eyes and a large toothy mouth.

Anki-Kiele could send a good catch of fish or success in the extraction of other marine life. This could be achieved by sending the shaman's soul to him.

Anky-kele hairy creature water creature

Anky-kele

The spirit of the sea from Chukchi and Eskimo mythology. It has a huge shaggy head with two eyes and a large toothy mouth.

Anki-Kiele could send a good catch of fish or success in the extraction of other marine life. This could be achieved by sending the shaman's soul to him.

Annun 's Dogs hairy creature sounds without visible sources the harbinger of death translucent

Annun 's Dogs

In the mythology of the British Celts, these are ghostly white dogs with red ears. They were harbingers of death. It was to them that the barking was attributed, coming from nowhere.

Annun 's Pack hairy creature sounds without visible sources the harbinger of death translucent

Annun 's Pack

In the mythology of the British Celts, these are ghostly white dogs with red ears. They were harbingers of death. It was to them that the barking was attributed, coming from nowhere.

Anschikh Titva Pyalt animal body parts anthropomorphic creature

Anschikh Titva Pyalt

An old man the length of a Hare is a literal translation of the name of Anschikh Titva Pyalt.

A character in Mansi fairy tales, a dwarf with incredibly long ears trailing behind him on the ground, and with a harelip opening from ear to ear.

Ansih Titva Pyalt animal body parts anthropomorphic creature

Ansih Titva Pyalt

An old man the length of a Hare is a literal translation of the name of Anschikh Titva Pyalt.

A character in Mansi fairy tales, a dwarf with incredibly long ears trailing behind him on the ground, and with a harelip opening from ear to ear.

An Old Man as Long as a Hare animal body parts anthropomorphic creature

An Old Man as Long as a Hare

An old man the length of a Hare is a literal translation of the name of Anschikh Titva Pyalt.

A character in Mansi fairy tales, a dwarf with incredibly long ears trailing behind him on the ground, and with a harelip opening from ear to ear.

Anzud animal body parts

Anzud

In Sumero-Akkadian mythology, an eagle with a lion's head, the messenger of the gods. The image of Anzud is one of the most popular in Sumerian heraldry.

The first root "An-" (in the name "Anzud", "Anzu") means noise. "An" = "heaven; god of heaven"[3]. The second root "-Itch, -Zu" (and the name "Shutu", which is close to "-Itch") can be considered the proper name of this deity.

This huge bird of divine origin with a lion's head, later (approximately from the XIV century BC) was represented simply as a giant eagle. She has great power. For example, in the legend of the flood, a strange bird is already destroying the earthly world with the help of lightning released from its claws. He is also able to change his appearance at will.

In the myths of the Sumerians, Anzud usually acts as an intermediary between heaven and earth, that is, between people and gods, he simultaneously embodies both good and evil.

Anzu animal body parts

Anzu

In Sumero-Akkadian mythology, an eagle with a lion's head, the messenger of the gods. The image of Anzud is one of the most popular in Sumerian heraldry.

The first root "An-" (in the name "Anzud", "Anzu") means noise. "An" = "heaven; god of heaven"[3]. The second root "-Itch, -Zu" (and the name "Shutu", which is close to "-Itch") can be considered the proper name of this deity.

This huge bird of divine origin with a lion's head, later (approximately from the XIV century BC) was represented simply as a giant eagle. She has great power. For example, in the legend of the flood, a strange bird is already destroying the earthly world with the help of lightning released from its claws. He is also able to change his appearance at will.

In the myths of the Sumerians, Anzud usually acts as an intermediary between heaven and earth, that is, between people and gods, he simultaneously embodies both good and evil.

Ao-bodzu anthropomorphic creature choking victim large creature superpowered creature the unusual shape of the eyes

Ao-bodzu

According to Japanese mythology, a bizarre big blue-skinned and one-eyed monk with strong magic. A super-strong creature capable of killing people by strangulation.

Aobodzu (я 青, "Blue Buddhist monk", "blue Buddhist monk" or "immature Buddhist monk", arch. a man with a shaved head). Appears in the artist's book Toriyama Sekien's "Illustrated Night Parade of 100 Demons".

In Okayama, they are described as two-eyed giants who settle in abandoned or uninhabited houses. In other stories, they appear in wheat fields, or on dark, lonely roads.

In Kagawa, Aobozu appear late at night in front of young women and ask them: "Would you like to hang on your own neck?" If a woman says no, Aobozu disappears without a word. However, if she does not pay attention to him or does not say anything, he attacks her with lightning speed, beats her and hangs her by the neck.

They could be driven away with a wicker basket or other object with a large number of holes, which the monsters took for eyes and therefore avoided them out of fear or envy.

Aobodzu anthropomorphic creature choking victim large creature superpowered creature the unusual shape of the eyes

Aobodzu

According to Japanese mythology, a bizarre big blue-skinned and one-eyed monk with strong magic. A super-strong creature capable of killing people by strangulation.

Aobodzu (я 青, "Blue Buddhist monk", "blue Buddhist monk" or "immature Buddhist monk", arch. a man with a shaved head). Appears in the artist's book Toriyama Sekien's "Illustrated Night Parade of 100 Demons".

In Okayama, they are described as two-eyed giants who settle in abandoned or uninhabited houses. In other stories, they appear in wheat fields, or on dark, lonely roads.

In Kagawa, Aobozu appear late at night in front of young women and ask them: "Would you like to hang on your own neck?" If a woman says no, Aobozu disappears without a word. However, if she does not pay attention to him or does not say anything, he attacks her with lightning speed, beats her and hangs her by the neck.

They could be driven away with a wicker basket or other object with a large number of holes, which the monsters took for eyes and therefore avoided them out of fear or envy.

Ao-sagi-bi a small light at the earth's surface unusual sounds water creature

Ao-sagi-bi

In Japanese mythology, there is a belief that many wading birds in old age begin to glow with a blue light and exhale small non-burning balls of the same blue color that are carried away by the wind. the blue fire of the heron does not burn and cannot set fire to anything.

Aosagi-bi a small light at the earth's surface unusual sounds water creature

Aosagi-bi

In Japanese mythology, there is a belief that many wading birds in old age begin to glow with a blue light and exhale small non-burning balls of the same blue color that are carried away by the wind. the blue fire of the heron does not burn and cannot set fire to anything.

Aosaginoi a small light at the earth's surface unusual sounds water creature

Aosaginoi

In Japanese mythology, there is a belief that many wading birds in old age begin to glow with a blue light and exhale small non-burning balls of the same blue color that are carried away by the wind. the blue fire of the heron does not burn and cannot set fire to anything.

Aosagibi a small light at the earth's surface unusual sounds water creature

Aosagibi

In Japanese mythology, there is a belief that many wading birds in old age begin to glow with a blue light and exhale small non-burning balls of the same blue color that are carried away by the wind. the blue fire of the heron does not burn and cannot set fire to anything.

Apop scales

Apop

A giant mottled serpent from Egyptian mythology. It usually curls in rings, and when it stretches, it reaches a length of 450 cubits (about 230 meters).

Represents darkness and evil, the eternal enemy of the sun god Ra. ​​Apop dwells in the depths of the earth, where his struggle with Ra takes place.

Apep scales

Apep

A giant mottled serpent from Egyptian mythology. It usually curls in rings, and when it stretches, it reaches a length of 450 cubits (about 230 meters).

Represents darkness and evil, the eternal enemy of the sun god Ra. ​​Apop dwells in the depths of the earth, where his struggle with Ra takes place.

Apophis scales

Apophis

A giant mottled serpent from Egyptian mythology. It usually curls in rings, and when it stretches, it reaches a length of 450 cubits (about 230 meters).

Represents darkness and evil, the eternal enemy of the sun god Ra. ​​Apop dwells in the depths of the earth, where his struggle with Ra takes place.

Apsaras anthropomorphic creature sexual relations with the victim

Apsaras

Indian nymphs, celestial dancers and temptresses of hermits.

Spirits of clouds or water. They look like beautiful women with unfading beauty, dressed in rich clothes and wearing jewelry.

In Vedic mythology, they were the wives and lovers of the Gandharvas. During the transition to Hindu mythology, they acquired the functions of celestial dancers and courtesans.

Also, according to legend, the Apsaras appease the heroes who fell in battle in the paradise of Indra (similar to the Scandinavian Valhalla or Paradise in Islam).

 

Apsaras anthropomorphic creature sexual relations with the victim

Apsaras

Indian nymphs, celestial dancers and temptresses of hermits.

Spirits of clouds or water. They look like beautiful women with unfading beauty, dressed in rich clothes and wearing jewelry.

In Vedic mythology, they were the wives and lovers of the Gandharvas. During the transition to Hindu mythology, they acquired the functions of celestial dancers and courtesans.

Also, according to legend, the Apsaras appease the heroes who fell in battle in the paradise of Indra (similar to the Scandinavian Valhalla or Paradise in Islam).

 

Artabatites anthropomorphic creature

Artabatites

According to ancient and medieval authors, the African people, whose representatives move on all fours, like animals. They also roar and growl instead of speech. It is believed that its representatives do not live up to 40 years.

Artibatira anthropomorphic creature

Artibatira

According to ancient and medieval authors, the African people, whose representatives move on all fours, like animals. They also roar and growl instead of speech. It is believed that its representatives do not live up to 40 years.

Artabatite anthropomorphic creature

Artabatite

According to ancient and medieval authors, the African people, whose representatives move on all fours, like animals. They also roar and growl instead of speech. It is believed that its representatives do not live up to 40 years.

Artabatitay anthropomorphic creature

Artabatitay

According to ancient and medieval authors, the African people, whose representatives move on all fours, like animals. They also roar and growl instead of speech. It is believed that its representatives do not live up to 40 years.

Arulatag anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body glowing eyes hairy creature high being hurting people large creature unusual eye color

Arulatag

In the southwestern part of Alaska, near Lake Illiamna, a local yeti appears: Arulatag or Nantina or Urayuli ("shaggy").

This creature is 2 to 3 meters tall (sometimes even higher), covered with shaggy dark fur. He looks very similar to a large monkey with very long arms that hang down below the knees in a standing position. His eyes are red and burn brightly in the dark.

The creature swims very well, can steal livestock (especially dogs), food or fish from fishermen. The proof of its existence is considered gigantic footprints that are found near the lake.

Arzuri a small light at the earth's surface unusual sounds water creature

Arzuri

The owner of the forest in Chuvash and Turkic mythology.

Perhaps the term "arzuri" goes back to the ancient name of a deity close to the Slavic Shchur. Another name of arzuri is "varman tura" ("forest god") — similar to one of the names of the goblin "Urman iyase" ("master of the forest") among the Kazan and West Siberian Tatars. The southern Chuvash consider Arzuri to be ubede's wife, which is why they also call her "varman amashe" ("mother of the forest"). From the Chuvash languagetranslated as Half - man .

Looks like a tall naked woman with hair to the ground and with a body covered with hair (except for the genitals). She has huge eyes, breasts hanging down (she puts them on her shoulders while walking). Some myths mention three arms, three legs and four eyes (two in front and two behind).

It can change its appearance from human and animal to various objects (branches, a sheaf of hay, etc.) and lights flying between the branches. Scares people with various shouts and laughter. It can attack and maim.

It is considered the restless spirit of a suicide or a person buried not according to the rules.

Arzuri is very afraid of iron, whip, fire, water, dogs and the crackling of cherry trees on the fire. Arzuri likes to ride horses, so you can catch him by smearing the horse's back with resin.

If you meet Arzuri on the way, you have to say: "Uphill!". Then arzuri will fall behind and will not be able to catch up. According to other beliefs, when meeting with arzuri, it is necessary to throw a piece of bread in her direction.

In the mythology of other Turkic-speaking peoples, the Arzuri correspond to the shural of the Kazan Tatars and Bashkirs, and the pitsen of the West Siberian Tatars.

Archaeological sites indicate that the image of Arzuri was widely spread among the Volga Suvaro-Bulgarians.

Arsuri a small light at the earth's surface unusual sounds water creature

Arsuri

The owner of the forest in Chuvash and Turkic mythology.

Perhaps the term "arzuri" goes back to the ancient name of a deity close to the Slavic Shchur. Another name of arzuri is "varman tura" ("forest god") — similar to one of the names of the goblin "Urman iyase" ("master of the forest") among the Kazan and West Siberian Tatars. The southern Chuvash consider Arzuri to be ubede's wife, which is why they also call her "varman amashe" ("mother of the forest"). From the Chuvash languagetranslated as Half - man .

Looks like a tall naked woman with hair to the ground and with a body covered with hair (except for the genitals). She has huge eyes, breasts hanging down (she puts them on her shoulders while walking). Some myths mention three arms, three legs and four eyes (two in front and two behind).

It can change its appearance from human and animal to various objects (branches, a sheaf of hay, etc.) and lights flying between the branches. Scares people with various shouts and laughter. It can attack and maim.

It is considered the restless spirit of a suicide or a person buried not according to the rules.

Arzuri is very afraid of iron, whip, fire, water, dogs and the crackling of cherry trees on the fire. Arzuri likes to ride horses, so you can catch him by smearing the horse's back with resin.

If you meet Arzuri on the way, you have to say: "Uphill!". Then arzuri will fall behind and will not be able to catch up. According to other beliefs, when meeting with arzuri, it is necessary to throw a piece of bread in her direction.

In the mythology of other Turkic-speaking peoples, the Arzuri correspond to the shural of the Kazan Tatars and Bashkirs, and the pitsen of the West Siberian Tatars.

Archaeological sites indicate that the image of Arzuri was widely spread among the Volga Suvaro-Bulgarians.

Asanbosam anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood unusual eye color

Asanbosam

A creature from the folklore of the Ashanti people (West Africa). It is believed that pronouncing the name of Asanbosama alone can cause trouble.

Outwardly, it looks like a man overgrown with fur with large bloodshot eyes and protruding iron teeth. Sometimes disproportionately long legs are distinguished. In some stories, he has a long tail (sometimes with a snake's head at the end), on which he hangs, like a monkey. It is also said that he has hooks on his legs, with which he clings to tree branches and hangs upside down in anticipation of a victim. He hooks her up, bites her thumb or foot, and then drinks blood from the wound. 

Sasabonsam — or another name for asanbosam, or its flying variety, with bat wings.

Nagloper is probably the highest kind of asanbosam, capable, among other things, of changing its appearance, as well as turning its victims into asanbosams and forcing them to attack people. The unique difference between the treatment of naglopers from European vampires is that they return the victim to the original human form if she does everything she is ordered to do.

Asasabonsam anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood unusual eye color

Asasabonsam

A creature from the folklore of the Ashanti people (West Africa). It is believed that pronouncing the name of Asanbosama alone can cause trouble.

Outwardly, it looks like a man overgrown with fur with large bloodshot eyes and protruding iron teeth. Sometimes disproportionately long legs are distinguished. In some stories, he has a long tail (sometimes with a snake's head at the end), on which he hangs, like a monkey. It is also said that he has hooks on his legs, with which he clings to tree branches and hangs upside down in anticipation of a victim. He hooks her up, bites her thumb or foot, and then drinks blood from the wound. 

Sasabonsam — or another name for asanbosam, or its flying variety, with bat wings.

Nagloper is probably the highest kind of asanbosam, capable, among other things, of changing its appearance, as well as turning its victims into asanbosams and forcing them to attack people. The unique difference between the treatment of naglopers from European vampires is that they return the victim to the original human form if she does everything she is ordered to do.

Askefroy anthropomorphic creature

Askefroy

In Scandinavian mythology, the spirit of the ash tree in the form of a woman. She is able to magically take away the power of a warrior or send bad luck.

Ash's wife anthropomorphic creature

Ash's wife

In Scandinavian mythology, the spirit of the ash tree in the form of a woman. She is able to magically take away the power of a warrior or send bad luck.

Ash Nymph anthropomorphic creature

Ash Nymph

In Scandinavian mythology, the spirit of the ash tree in the form of a woman. She is able to magically take away the power of a warrior or send bad luck.

Aswang afraid of the light changes form hurting people turns into a human turns into an animal unusual sounds

Aswang

A generic term for various shape-shifting evil creatures in Filipino folklore, such as vampires, ghouls, witches, suckers of entrails, and werewolf beasts (usually dogs, cats, pigs). Despite the absence of any special motives other than harming others, their behavior can be interpreted as an inversion of traditional Filipino values. Aswang is especially popular in the Visayas, southern parts of Luzon and parts of Mindanao, including Capiz.

Aswangs usually live at night in cemeteries and forests, as their strength in the daytime is significantly reduced, and sometimes completely disappear. Despite being described as wild monsters that often live in the wilderness and on the fringes of society, Aswangs are also described as creatures capable of living in the immediate vicinity or even within the village, leading to several reports of Aswan attacks in major localities. Their ability to adapt and live in urban and rural environments populated by humans, while maintaining their wild monstrous nature, is mentioned as a feature that distinguishes Aswangs from most other monsters. 

They are also usually afraid of the light (which is why the wake was often brightly lit so that Aswan would not come to the funeral to steal and devour the corpse). They are also dismissive of noise, but in rare cases they are called vangs who attend noisy parties.

Aswangs are traditionally described as one-dimensional monsters and evil by nature, who have no explicable motives other than harming and devouring other creatures. Their openly evil behavior can be characterized as an inversion of traditional Filipino values (strong kinship and family closeness): Aswangs have no bias when choosing their prey and do not hesitate to target their own relatives. 

Aswangs are considered unclean and prefer raw human meat to contrast the value with the purity of cooked, seasoned and flavored food characteristic of traditional Filipino culture. Aswangs are also often described as indecent in behavior, and female aswangs often expose their genitals, which contradicts the values of traditional modesty.

There are several ways to expel or kill Aswang. The various countermeasures used to defend against the creatures often vary depending on the cultural and symbolic meaning of each instrument: holy objects, spices, salt, ash, stingray tail, large crustaceans, vinegar, chewing betel nuts and urine, as well as turning over the stairs leading to the house.

Since aswan was believed to be the cause of miscarriages, countermeasures were developed to drive away aswan and prevent them from wandering during childbirth. One way is for the husband of a pregnant wife to remain naked under the house, furiously brandishing a sword.

There is also a special oil against aswang. To make this oil, select a specific coconut and watch it grow. Collect it at dusk when the moon is full, when it is wet and cloudy, the breeze should also be cool. The coconut should be grated and the juice squeezed out of it. Cook the mixture until it becomes butter. Read secret prayers and throw all the waste into the ocean so aswan can't trace who made the oil. After completion, the oil should be hung at the door of the house: it will boil when aswan is nearby.

There are other methods of detecting aswan without using special oil: creaking coming from the ceiling of a house is often a sign of the presence of an ashwang nearby, and reincarnated aswangs can be detected by looking at whether your reflection is inverted in the creature's eyes. In addition, they can be dogs, cats and pigs without tails.

To kill the creature, you can use a bolo knife to stab the witch in the middle of the back: if this area is not affected, he can lick the wounds to heal them. It is not recommended to use firearms.

Tick-tick is a variant of the name of Aswang in the TV series "Grimm".

Aswanga afraid of the light changes form hurting people turns into a human turns into an animal unusual sounds

Aswanga

A generic term for various shape-shifting evil creatures in Filipino folklore, such as vampires, ghouls, witches, suckers of entrails, and werewolf beasts (usually dogs, cats, pigs). Despite the absence of any special motives other than harming others, their behavior can be interpreted as an inversion of traditional Filipino values. Aswang is especially popular in the Visayas, southern parts of Luzon and parts of Mindanao, including Capiz.

Aswangs usually live at night in cemeteries and forests, as their strength in the daytime is significantly reduced, and sometimes completely disappear. Despite being described as wild monsters that often live in the wilderness and on the fringes of society, Aswangs are also described as creatures capable of living in the immediate vicinity or even within the village, leading to several reports of Aswan attacks in major localities. Their ability to adapt and live in urban and rural environments populated by humans, while maintaining their wild monstrous nature, is mentioned as a feature that distinguishes Aswangs from most other monsters. 

They are also usually afraid of the light (which is why the wake was often brightly lit so that Aswan would not come to the funeral to steal and devour the corpse). They are also dismissive of noise, but in rare cases they are called vangs who attend noisy parties.

Aswangs are traditionally described as one-dimensional monsters and evil by nature, who have no explicable motives other than harming and devouring other creatures. Their openly evil behavior can be characterized as an inversion of traditional Filipino values (strong kinship and family closeness): Aswangs have no bias when choosing their prey and do not hesitate to target their own relatives. 

Aswangs are considered unclean and prefer raw human meat to contrast the value with the purity of cooked, seasoned and flavored food characteristic of traditional Filipino culture. Aswangs are also often described as indecent in behavior, and female aswangs often expose their genitals, which contradicts the values of traditional modesty.

There are several ways to expel or kill Aswang. The various countermeasures used to defend against the creatures often vary depending on the cultural and symbolic meaning of each instrument: holy objects, spices, salt, ash, stingray tail, large crustaceans, vinegar, chewing betel nuts and urine, as well as turning over the stairs leading to the house.

Since aswan was believed to be the cause of miscarriages, countermeasures were developed to drive away aswan and prevent them from wandering during childbirth. One way is for the husband of a pregnant wife to remain naked under the house, furiously brandishing a sword.

There is also a special oil against aswang. To make this oil, select a specific coconut and watch it grow. Collect it at dusk when the moon is full, when it is wet and cloudy, the breeze should also be cool. The coconut should be grated and the juice squeezed out of it. Cook the mixture until it becomes butter. Read secret prayers and throw all the waste into the ocean so aswan can't trace who made the oil. After completion, the oil should be hung at the door of the house: it will boil when aswan is nearby.

There are other methods of detecting aswan without using special oil: creaking coming from the ceiling of a house is often a sign of the presence of an ashwang nearby, and reincarnated aswangs can be detected by looking at whether your reflection is inverted in the creature's eyes. In addition, they can be dogs, cats and pigs without tails.

To kill the creature, you can use a bolo knife to stab the witch in the middle of the back: if this area is not affected, he can lick the wounds to heal them. It is not recommended to use firearms.

Tick-tick is a variant of the name of Aswang in the TV series "Grimm".

Asuvan afraid of the light changes form hurting people turns into a human turns into an animal unusual sounds

Asuvan

A generic term for various shape-shifting evil creatures in Filipino folklore, such as vampires, ghouls, witches, suckers of entrails, and werewolf beasts (usually dogs, cats, pigs). Despite the absence of any special motives other than harming others, their behavior can be interpreted as an inversion of traditional Filipino values. Aswang is especially popular in the Visayas, southern parts of Luzon and parts of Mindanao, including Capiz.

Aswangs usually live at night in cemeteries and forests, as their strength in the daytime is significantly reduced, and sometimes completely disappear. Despite being described as wild monsters that often live in the wilderness and on the fringes of society, Aswangs are also described as creatures capable of living in the immediate vicinity or even within the village, leading to several reports of Aswan attacks in major localities. Their ability to adapt and live in urban and rural environments populated by humans, while maintaining their wild monstrous nature, is mentioned as a feature that distinguishes Aswangs from most other monsters. 

They are also usually afraid of the light (which is why the wake was often brightly lit so that Aswan would not come to the funeral to steal and devour the corpse). They are also dismissive of noise, but in rare cases they are called vangs who attend noisy parties.

Aswangs are traditionally described as one-dimensional monsters and evil by nature, who have no explicable motives other than harming and devouring other creatures. Their openly evil behavior can be characterized as an inversion of traditional Filipino values (strong kinship and family closeness): Aswangs have no bias when choosing their prey and do not hesitate to target their own relatives. 

Aswangs are considered unclean and prefer raw human meat to contrast the value with the purity of cooked, seasoned and flavored food characteristic of traditional Filipino culture. Aswangs are also often described as indecent in behavior, and female aswangs often expose their genitals, which contradicts the values of traditional modesty.

There are several ways to expel or kill Aswang. The various countermeasures used to defend against the creatures often vary depending on the cultural and symbolic meaning of each instrument: holy objects, spices, salt, ash, stingray tail, large crustaceans, vinegar, chewing betel nuts and urine, as well as turning over the stairs leading to the house.

Since aswan was believed to be the cause of miscarriages, countermeasures were developed to drive away aswan and prevent them from wandering during childbirth. One way is for the husband of a pregnant wife to remain naked under the house, furiously brandishing a sword.

There is also a special oil against aswang. To make this oil, select a specific coconut and watch it grow. Collect it at dusk when the moon is full, when it is wet and cloudy, the breeze should also be cool. The coconut should be grated and the juice squeezed out of it. Cook the mixture until it becomes butter. Read secret prayers and throw all the waste into the ocean so aswan can't trace who made the oil. After completion, the oil should be hung at the door of the house: it will boil when aswan is nearby.

There are other methods of detecting aswan without using special oil: creaking coming from the ceiling of a house is often a sign of the presence of an ashwang nearby, and reincarnated aswangs can be detected by looking at whether your reflection is inverted in the creature's eyes. In addition, they can be dogs, cats and pigs without tails.

To kill the creature, you can use a bolo knife to stab the witch in the middle of the back: if this area is not affected, he can lick the wounds to heal them. It is not recommended to use firearms.

Tick-tick is a variant of the name of Aswang in the TV series "Grimm".

Atsan anthropomorphic creature the little creature

Atsan

In Abkhazian, Ossetian and Adyghe mythology, a dwarf is from a people who lived on earth before the age of humans. Now they live underground and have a very small stature (not visible in the grass). They had a broad chest and powerful shoulders, and were distinguished by great physical strength. They bred small cattle, which were kept in atsanguars, rode hares and milked deer.

Btsentæ is the Ossetian name of atsanov

Zheki — Balkarian and Karachai name of atsanov

Isps and Spi — Adyghe names of atsans

Adana anthropomorphic creature the little creature

Adana

In Abkhazian, Ossetian and Adyghe mythology, a dwarf is from a people who lived on earth before the age of humans. Now they live underground and have a very small stature (not visible in the grass). They had a broad chest and powerful shoulders, and were distinguished by great physical strength. They bred small cattle, which were kept in atsanguars, rode hares and milked deer.

Btsentæ is the Ossetian name of atsanov

Zheki — Balkarian and Karachai name of atsanov

Isps and Spi — Adyghe names of atsans

Avank high being water creature

Avank

A creature from Welsh mythology. This aquatic creature, looking like a huge crocodile or beaver, drags under the water. cattle and sometimes even people.

Avanc lives in a pool called Llyn-yr-Avanc (Llyn yr Afanc) on the river Conwy in the North Wales.

There is a legend that one of King Arthur's knights went to fight with an Addank - that is, with an avank. His beloved gave him a stone with her, thanks to which he could see the avank, while remaining invisible himself. He entered the cave of Avanka, took in his left hand the stone that the lady gave him, and in his right hand the sword. And when he entered, he saw Addank and immediately cut off his head with a sword.

Addank high being water creature

Addank

A creature from Welsh mythology. This aquatic creature, looking like a huge crocodile or beaver, drags under the water. cattle and sometimes even people.

Avanc lives in a pool called Llyn-yr-Avanc (Llyn yr Afanc) on the river Conwy in the North Wales.

There is a legend that one of King Arthur's knights went to fight with an Addank - that is, with an avank. His beloved gave him a stone with her, thanks to which he could see the avank, while remaining invisible himself. He entered the cave of Avanka, took in his left hand the stone that the lady gave him, and in his right hand the sword. And when he entered, he saw Addank and immediately cut off his head with a sword.

Afank high being water creature

Afank

A creature from Welsh mythology. This aquatic creature, looking like a huge crocodile or beaver, drags under the water. cattle and sometimes even people.

Avanc lives in a pool called Llyn-yr-Avanc (Llyn yr Afanc) on the river Conwy in the North Wales.

There is a legend that one of King Arthur's knights went to fight with an Addank - that is, with an avank. His beloved gave him a stone with her, thanks to which he could see the avank, while remaining invisible himself. He entered the cave of Avanka, took in his left hand the stone that the lady gave him, and in his right hand the sword. And when he entered, he saw Addank and immediately cut off his head with a sword.

A cat that can change its appearance turns into a human

A cat that can change its appearance

In Japan, it is believed that a long-tailed cat can become a werewolf over time. They can take the form of the deceased or inhabit his body. But even without this, the animal can walk on its hind legs and talk.In human form, bakeneko demonstrate superhuman flexibility, mobility and cunning.

There are several ways for a cat to become a bakeneko: According to Japanese folklore, any cat that has lived for more than thirteen years, either tricolor, or one that weighs 1 kan (3.75 kg), or has a long tail, can become a bakeneko. In the latter case, the tail is bifurcated; such a bakeneko is called a nekomata (yap. 猫又 or 猫股 forked cat).

Bakeneko can create ghostly fireballs, walk on her hind legs; she can eat her master and take his form. It was also believed that if such a cat jumped over a fresh corpse, it would revive it.

Bakeneko also preys on humans. He puts his huge paws in the door, looking for human prey, as ordinary cats do when they hunt at a mouse hole.

Often these creatures are depicted licking oil from lamps (in ancient lamps, oil was made from fish oil). Because of this, they can breathe fire.

A woman from Shi anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

A woman from Shi

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Antsybal anthropomorphic creature hairy creature long limbs the distortion of time water creature

Antsybal

The evil spirit is the master of the swamp in East Slavic mythology. The female version is called bolotnitsa. 

Other names: bolotny, bolotny dedko, the fool of the swamp, the swamp devil, the swamp goblin, the king of the swamp, the swamp; as well as antsybal /antsibul /antsibalka /antsibolit / anchibal/ anchibol, zybochnik, kochechny, omutny; belor. balotnik; Ukrainian bolotyanik, antsibol, netecha[, ocheretyanik (from ocheret — "reed"). 

Antsybal — according to one version is a long-standing borrowing from the Baltic languages, comparable to Lit. ančiabalis — "duck swamp"; according to another version, this is a borrowing of the Czech ančibél, which could be the result of contamination of the words antikrist — "antichrist", and d'abel — "devil", and the convergence of the end part with the swamp occurred later; according to the third version, this is the result of the contraction of the expressions antichrist swamp, antip swamp, antiy bolotny through the intermediate antsibolotnik and antsibolot.

In the Russian North, they usually talked about the female spirit of the swamp, its mistress, the mistress of the tundra — the swamp woman, the swamp woman.

Often, the spirit living in the swamp was considered just a kind of water, a goblin or a devil, and the image of a swamp girl was mixed with the images of a leshachiha, a "free old woman", a mermaid, a water woman and a swamp kikimora.

The appearance of the swampman: a dirty, fat, eyeless creature sitting motionless at the bottom of the swamp, similar to a shaggy man with long arms and a tail. Sometimes it is a shaggy man with long arms and a tail.

It was believed that the swampman and the swamp woman lure a person or animal into a quagmire, where he dies.

Any sounds of the swamp were attributed to the swampman: to lure a person, he quacks like a duck, gurgles like a grouse, roars like a cow (the voice of a drink), moans or laughs (the voices of a white partridge and a snipe on the current).

Also, the swamper, in order to lure the traveler, lights lights in the swamp at night and grows flowers with an alluring aroma.

Ancibol anthropomorphic creature hairy creature long limbs the distortion of time water creature

Ancibol

The evil spirit is the master of the swamp in East Slavic mythology. The female version is called bolotnitsa. 

Other names: bolotny, bolotny dedko, the fool of the swamp, the swamp devil, the swamp goblin, the king of the swamp, the swamp; as well as antsybal /antsibul /antsibalka /antsibolit / anchibal/ anchibol, zybochnik, kochechny, omutny; belor. balotnik; Ukrainian bolotyanik, antsibol, netecha[, ocheretyanik (from ocheret — "reed"). 

Antsybal — according to one version is a long-standing borrowing from the Baltic languages, comparable to Lit. ančiabalis — "duck swamp"; according to another version, this is a borrowing of the Czech ančibél, which could be the result of contamination of the words antikrist — "antichrist", and d'abel — "devil", and the convergence of the end part with the swamp occurred later; according to the third version, this is the result of the contraction of the expressions antichrist swamp, antip swamp, antiy bolotny through the intermediate antsibolotnik and antsibolot.

In the Russian North, they usually talked about the female spirit of the swamp, its mistress, the mistress of the tundra — the swamp woman, the swamp woman.

Often, the spirit living in the swamp was considered just a kind of water, a goblin or a devil, and the image of a swamp girl was mixed with the images of a leshachiha, a "free old woman", a mermaid, a water woman and a swamp kikimora.

The appearance of the swampman: a dirty, fat, eyeless creature sitting motionless at the bottom of the swamp, similar to a shaggy man with long arms and a tail. Sometimes it is a shaggy man with long arms and a tail.

It was believed that the swampman and the swamp woman lure a person or animal into a quagmire, where he dies.

Any sounds of the swamp were attributed to the swampman: to lure a person, he quacks like a duck, gurgles like a grouse, roars like a cow (the voice of a drink), moans or laughs (the voices of a white partridge and a snipe on the current).

Also, the swamper, in order to lure the traveler, lights lights in the swamp at night and grows flowers with an alluring aroma.

Antip bolotny anthropomorphic creature hairy creature long limbs the distortion of time water creature

Antip bolotny

The evil spirit is the master of the swamp in East Slavic mythology. The female version is called bolotnitsa. 

Other names: bolotny, bolotny dedko, the fool of the swamp, the swamp devil, the swamp goblin, the king of the swamp, the swamp; as well as antsybal /antsibul /antsibalka /antsibolit / anchibal/ anchibol, zybochnik, kochechny, omutny; belor. balotnik; Ukrainian bolotyanik, antsibol, netecha[, ocheretyanik (from ocheret — "reed"). 

Antsybal — according to one version is a long-standing borrowing from the Baltic languages, comparable to Lit. ančiabalis — "duck swamp"; according to another version, this is a borrowing of the Czech ančibél, which could be the result of contamination of the words antikrist — "antichrist", and d'abel — "devil", and the convergence of the end part with the swamp occurred later; according to the third version, this is the result of the contraction of the expressions antichrist swamp, antip swamp, antiy bolotny through the intermediate antsibolotnik and antsibolot.

In the Russian North, they usually talked about the female spirit of the swamp, its mistress, the mistress of the tundra — the swamp woman, the swamp woman.

Often, the spirit living in the swamp was considered just a kind of water, a goblin or a devil, and the image of a swamp girl was mixed with the images of a leshachiha, a "free old woman", a mermaid, a water woman and a swamp kikimora.

The appearance of the swampman: a dirty, fat, eyeless creature sitting motionless at the bottom of the swamp, similar to a shaggy man with long arms and a tail. Sometimes it is a shaggy man with long arms and a tail.

It was believed that the swampman and the swamp woman lure a person or animal into a quagmire, where he dies.

Any sounds of the swamp were attributed to the swampman: to lure a person, he quacks like a duck, gurgles like a grouse, roars like a cow (the voice of a drink), moans or laughs (the voices of a white partridge and a snipe on the current).

Also, the swamper, in order to lure the traveler, lights lights in the swamp at night and grows flowers with an alluring aroma.

Anty bolotny anthropomorphic creature hairy creature long limbs the distortion of time water creature

Anty bolotny

The evil spirit is the master of the swamp in East Slavic mythology. The female version is called bolotnitsa. 

Other names: bolotny, bolotny dedko, the fool of the swamp, the swamp devil, the swamp goblin, the king of the swamp, the swamp; as well as antsybal /antsibul /antsibalka /antsibolit / anchibal/ anchibol, zybochnik, kochechny, omutny; belor. balotnik; Ukrainian bolotyanik, antsibol, netecha[, ocheretyanik (from ocheret — "reed"). 

Antsybal — according to one version is a long-standing borrowing from the Baltic languages, comparable to Lit. ančiabalis — "duck swamp"; according to another version, this is a borrowing of the Czech ančibél, which could be the result of contamination of the words antikrist — "antichrist", and d'abel — "devil", and the convergence of the end part with the swamp occurred later; according to the third version, this is the result of the contraction of the expressions antichrist swamp, antip swamp, antiy bolotny through the intermediate antsibolotnik and antsibolot.

In the Russian North, they usually talked about the female spirit of the swamp, its mistress, the mistress of the tundra — the swamp woman, the swamp woman.

Often, the spirit living in the swamp was considered just a kind of water, a goblin or a devil, and the image of a swamp girl was mixed with the images of a leshachiha, a "free old woman", a mermaid, a water woman and a swamp kikimora.

The appearance of the swampman: a dirty, fat, eyeless creature sitting motionless at the bottom of the swamp, similar to a shaggy man with long arms and a tail. Sometimes it is a shaggy man with long arms and a tail.

It was believed that the swampman and the swamp woman lure a person or animal into a quagmire, where he dies.

Any sounds of the swamp were attributed to the swampman: to lure a person, he quacks like a duck, gurgles like a grouse, roars like a cow (the voice of a drink), moans or laughs (the voices of a white partridge and a snipe on the current).

Also, the swamper, in order to lure the traveler, lights lights in the swamp at night and grows flowers with an alluring aroma.

Agta anthropomorphic creature hairy creature high being makes you wander sounds without visible sources

Agta

A tree demon from the folklore of the Philippine Islands, a bearded humanoid creature 2-3 meters tall. Invisible to man, but can make him wander. His presence betrays laughter out of nowhere, an abundance of dragonflies or smoke.

Animal death hooves the bare bones of the skeleton the harbinger of death turns into an animal

Animal death

Personification of the death of cattle among the Eastern Slavs. 

It appears in the form of a cow or a cat (most often black), or a dog, sometimes in the form of a cow skeleton (a symbol that originated on the model of the popular image of human death) or an old disgusting woman.

Its appearance is accompanied by a mass death of livestock.

It was believed that Cow death appears most often on the day of Agafya Cowshed. 

To frighten Death, the procession raised an incredible noise: they rattled scythes, frying pans, sickles, stove shutters, raised shouts and screams. If an animal (cat, dog) came across, it was immediately killed, believing that it was Death, hiding in the form of a werewolf.

A talisman against Cow death were worn-out old bast shoes soaked in tar, which were hung in the barn

Alva a small light at the earth's surface anthropomorphic creature flattened plants memory lapses the distortion of time the glowing areas of the body the little creature the manipulation of the thoughts of the victim the transition to another world

Alva

Magical folk from Germanic-Scandinavian and Celtic folklore. They are also known by the names alva (Scandinavian), sida (Ancient Irish). The word "elf" itself is associated by some researchers with the Roman root "alb" — "white", according to another version it came from the Welsh "ellyl" or the Irish "aillil" — "shining", going back to the Sumerian "ellu" ("shining"). According to the descriptions of elves and fairies differ little.

Being benevolent to people. Descriptions of elves in various mythologies vary, but, as a rule, they are beautiful, light (sometimes even glowing) creatures, spirits of the forest. Sometimes they kidnap people (or their belongings) by taking them to their country, where a person has lost track of vermin. Sometimes they dance in forests or meadows in the form of lights, leaving trampled areas.

Anchutka bespyatny animal body parts anthropomorphic creature hairy creature hooves hurting people sexual relations with the victim turns into a human turns into an animal

Anchutka bespyatny

The devil (the same as the devil and is close to the concept of the devil). He has quite a lot of different names, since the name of the demon of hell, the name of the devil was not supposed to be pronounced aloud: Satan, anchutka bespyatny, simply "bespyatny", goat-footed, demon, unclean, evil, cursed, unnamed, enemy of the human race, buffoon, etc. V. I. Dahl and S. V. Maksimov list over a hundred names-euphemisms.

In English, devil. The images of the Baltic Velnyas are close to him (lit. velnias), Shaitan among the Islamic peoples, surt of the German-Scandinavians. For the first time the word was recorded by R. James in the Russian-English dictionary-diary of 1618-1619.

In Slavic mythology, an evil spirit is mischievous, playful and lustful. Under various nicknames and synonyms , he is a character of a huge number of fairy tales Eastern Europe, the most popular character of Russian demonology.

It was believed that the mere mention of the devil was enough for him to hear it and approach an unwary person, or even harm him.

Devils have a generally anthropomorphic appearance, but with the addition of some fantastic or monstrous details. The most common appearance is identical to the image of the ancient Pan, fauns and satyrs — horns, tail and goat legs or hooves, sometimes wool, less often pig piglet, claws, bat wings, etc. Devils are believed to be able to take the form of animals of the old cult — goats, wolves, dogs, ravens, snakes, etc., but sometimes they appear in the form of a human.

Aulva anthropomorphic creature pass the device or knowledge the transition to another world

Aulva

The "hidden Inhabitants" (isl. huldufólk) are characters in Icelandic folk tales. They used to be called "aulvas", which is etymologically the same as "elves".

They practically do not differ from people: they are born and die, they run a household, they have their own churches, priests and cemeteries.

Outwardly Hidden inhabitants also differ little from humans: the only difference is the absence of nasal cartilage or a vertical fossa between the upper lip and nose.

The world of these creatures is somewhere not far from the world of people, but people see them only if they are clairvoyant, or if the Hidden Inhabitants themselves want to be seen.

After Christianity became the state religion in Iceland, elves began to be divided into two types — "pagans" (evil towards people) and "Christians" (kind towards people). However, this division was soon forgotten.

Icelandic fairy tales tell about interesting contacts of people with huldufoulk. They often ask people for help, and if people help them, then they do something good for them or give them something, and if they don't help, then they take revenge on them.

Some fairy tales tell how "hidden inhabitants" ask for help from people during childbirth, since they cannot give birth until a human hand touches the woman in labor.

Some Icelanders still believe in the existence of huldufoulk and try to leave the places where they think they live unchanged, and even if they build a road crossing the huldufoulk trail, they narrow the road so that it is easier for fairy-tale characters to cross it.

Afrit anthropomorphic creature burn marks flying creature generating a fire creature large creature restless spirit superpowered creature the glowing areas of the body the manipulation of the thoughts of the victim thermal effects on the body

Afrit

In Muslim mythology, this is a kind of jinn or fire elemental, which is the soul of a person who died a violent death (every drop of blood of the murdered person arises according to an ifrit). The body of the ifrit is made of basalt, bronze and molten lava. His figure is huge, bursts with heat and glows with a dark orange light. He flies, generates fire, is able to fulfill desires and cause confusion.

Ayakashi tentacles water creature

Ayakashi

In Japanese folklore, these are huge sea monsters that live in the open sea off the coast of Japan. Their bodies are covered in slippery oil that spreads around when they swim in the ocean. And the body is many kilometers long.

Anput animal body parts anthropomorphic creature

Anput

A creature from Egyptian mythology in the form of a woman with the head of a jackal. The goddess of embalming and mummification.

Ama anthropomorphic creature hurting people translucent water creature

Ama

There is an insidious sea spirit in Japanese folklore. If you look at her from the front, you can see a woman, although the lower part of her body is blurry, and if from behind, then a rock. She likes to appear before the ship or boat goes out to sea, approach the sailors and ask them to lend her a scoop. If someone fulfills her request, she immediately starts pouring water into the ship or boat until the ship slowly sank to the bottom.

Angry Jenny anthropomorphic creature hurting people water creature

Angry Jenny

A creature from English folklore. Jenny can kidnap children if they are playing near the water, and drag them to the very bottom. The approach of this creature is usually indicated by a greenish foam that suddenly appeared on the calm surface of a pond or other body of water.

Often they scratch their legs with sharp claws until they bleed, or simply frighten with their terrible appearance: long wet hair loose over their shoulders, large green fangs sticking out of their mouths, and very sharp shiny claws.

Green-toothed Jenny (also Evil Jenny, Green-Toothed Ginny; English Jenny Greenteeth, Jinny Greenteeth, Wicked Jenny, Ginny Greenteeth, Jeannie Greenteeth; from the ancient English language "Jenny" — "fair") — a river or swamp witch in English folklore, which probably explained the cruel death of people in reservoirs. It is known in the counties of Lancashire, Cheshire, Shropshire, Yorkshire.

A woman with her mouth cut open anthropomorphic creature fastest thing

A woman with her mouth cut open

Kutisake-onna (yap. 口裂け女, lit. "a woman with a torn/slashed mouth") — a famous Japanese urban legend about a beautiful woman who was mutilated and killed by her jealous husband, and then returned to the world of the living as a vengeful evil spirit.

A character of Japanese urban legends, a vengeful spirit in the form of a woman with her mouth cut from ear to ear. She usually wears a surgical mask. A woman will stop the child and ask: "Am I beautiful?" If the child answers "no", the woman will kill him with the scissors she carries with her. If the child says "yes", then the woman removes the mask, opening the mouth cut from ear to ear, and asks: If this time the child answers "no", then the woman will cut him in half, if he still answers "yes", then his mouth will be cut from ear to ear.

It is impossible to escape from it, since it simply reappears in front of its victim.

Apple Maiden anthropomorphic creature it feeds on life energy sexual relations with the victim

Apple Maiden

The name comes from Gaelic words meaning lover, mistress or concubine and a term for a burial mound or burial ground. According to another variant, liaian shi can be translated as fairy lover or fairy mistress.

Dirg-do can be translated as "sucking red blood".

Creatures from folklore Ireland and the Isle of Man, which are found mainly in wells and springs. 

Usually she appears to some man in the image of a written beauty, invisible to everyone else. That's just not so sweet and friendly this golden-haired girl in a green dress when she lures lonely travelers to her voice. She bites through the neck of the poor devils who are tired of singing and drinks all the blood, killing her victim. 

Like other vampires, only garlic and silver are saved from her.

Astromove anthropomorphic creature

Astromove

A mythical people of mouthless people who feed on the smell of fried fish and floral aroma from medieval bestiaries.

In different versions they may have different names (for example, in Slavic bestiaries it is known as Astonii or Astromove).

The ambassador of the Syrian king Nikator Megasphenes, who was at the court of the Indian king Chandragupta Maurya, told that at the sources of the Ganges there lived human beings devoid of a mouth; they fed on steam from cooking meat, as well as the aroma of fruits and flowers, and had a respiratory organ instead of a mouth. They could not stand bad smells and therefore survived with difficulty, especially when they found themselves in a military camp.

Astomias anthropomorphic creature

Astomias

A mythical people of mouthless people who feed on the smell of fried fish and floral aroma from medieval bestiaries.

In different versions they may have different names (for example, in Slavic bestiaries it is known as Astonii or Astromove).

The ambassador of the Syrian king Nikator Megasphenes, who was at the court of the Indian king Chandragupta Maurya, told that at the sources of the Ganges there lived human beings devoid of a mouth; they fed on steam from cooking meat, as well as the aroma of fruits and flowers, and had a respiratory organ instead of a mouth. They could not stand bad smells and therefore survived with difficulty, especially when they found themselves in a military camp.

Astonia anthropomorphic creature

Astonia

A mythical people of mouthless people who feed on the smell of fried fish and floral aroma from medieval bestiaries.

In different versions they may have different names (for example, in Slavic bestiaries it is known as Astonii or Astromove).

The ambassador of the Syrian king Nikator Megasphenes, who was at the court of the Indian king Chandragupta Maurya, told that at the sources of the Ganges there lived human beings devoid of a mouth; they fed on steam from cooking meat, as well as the aroma of fruits and flowers, and had a respiratory organ instead of a mouth. They could not stand bad smells and therefore survived with difficulty, especially when they found themselves in a military camp.

Albasta anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body hairy creature hanging Breasts high being hurting people water creature

Albasta

Creatures from Slavic mythology (in particular, the territories of the present Astrakhan, Samara regions, in the regions of the Middle Volga).

The word itself is probably a corruption of "albasta", from the beliefs of the Turkic peoples. This is the most dangerous kind of mermaids, who appear in the form of half-dead decrepit old women. She is usually described as: an unnaturally large woman, with an ugly bloated, abstract figure and huge breasts hanging down to her knees. On her head she has a shock of dirty yellow hair, reaching to the ground, and not rarely and completely hiding the outlines of the creature.

She does not speak human language and only howls softly and wistfully. It lives near rivers, swamps and lakes, which makes it related to such characters as vodyanitsy and boggies. Due to the fact that it is a water character, it moves slowly on land.

She is the leader of mermaids and other aquatic creatures of Slavic folklore. Her task is the death of a person who has fallen into her clutches (more often a pregnant woman or a small child).

Amamehage anthropomorphic creature

Amamehage

In Japanese mythology, scary creatures living in the mountains along the northern coast of the Sea of Japan, with bright red or blue skin, disheveled hair and wild eyes. They have wide mouths full of sharp teeth, and often horns on their foreheads. They are dressed in straw wraps and raincoats, and they hold large knives in their hands. At the same time, they attack only those who have been lazy or angry for a year.

Amahage anthropomorphic creature

Amahage

In Japanese mythology, scary creatures living in the mountains along the northern coast of the Sea of Japan, with bright red or blue skin, disheveled hair and wild eyes. They have wide mouths full of sharp teeth, and often horns on their foreheads. They are dressed in straw wraps and raincoats, and they hold large knives in their hands. At the same time, they attack only those who have been lazy or angry for a year.

Appossia anthropomorphic creature

Appossia

In Japanese mythology, scary creatures living in the mountains along the northern coast of the Sea of Japan, with bright red or blue skin, disheveled hair and wild eyes. They have wide mouths full of sharp teeth, and often horns on their foreheads. They are dressed in straw wraps and raincoats, and they hold large knives in their hands. At the same time, they attack only those who have been lazy or angry for a year.

Arzhaven anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body water creature

Arzhaven

The owner of a swamp covered with rust from Belarusian mythology. He has an anthropomorphic, but disproportionate body: a huge belly, thin and long limbs. He draws travelers and animals to him.

A woman with a long neck a separate part of the body anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood flying creature restless spirit stretches limbs

A woman with a long neck

A creature from Japanese mythology. During the day it looks like an ordinary woman, but at night it turns into a vampire. The creature's head is capable of flying on a neck that stretches to an incredible length.

This head flies and drinks the blood of sleeping people, and sometimes it eats them completely. If the head of a creature is able to move separately from the body, without articulation with the neck, then such a spirit is called a Nukekubi.

Akrabuamelu animal body parts anthropomorphic creature

Akrabuamelu

In Akkadian mythology, mixanthropic creatures whose lower body is borrowed from huge scorpions.

Aluxob anthropomorphic creature hurting people makes you wander memory lapses sounds without visible sources the distortion of time the harbinger of death the little creature the transition to another world

Aluxob

Chanek or Chanek (Chanekeh, Chaneque or Ohuican Chaneque) are small, spirit-like creatures from Mexican folklore, considered to be elemental forces and guardians of nature.

In ancient legends, these creatures attacked intruders, scaring them so that their soul left their body, which they imprisoned in the depths of the earth. If the victim does not restore his soul with the help of a certain ritual, he will get sick and soon die.

In some modern legends, chanek is described as children with the face of old men or women who make people wander for three or seven days, after which the victims cannot remember what happened. It is believed that the creatures take their home in The underground world, the entrance to which is a dry kapok tree.

In Catholic beliefs, chaneka are the souls of children who died without Christian baptism.

Similar mythical creatures are common in Mesoamerican and other Latin American folklore traditions in general, called duende in Spanish. In the folklore tradition of the Yucatan Peninsula, these elementals are known as aluxob.

Ashtapada animal body parts large creature

Ashtapada

In Indian mythology, a mighty eight-legged animal resembling a wild deer living somewhere in the Himalayas. One of the incarnations of Shiva.

Atlantic Humpback Snake water creature

Atlantic Humpback Snake

In American legends there is a mention of a huge monster, similar to a reptile, which was seen in Gloucester Bay. 

The length of the snake according to descriptions ranged from 15.2 to more than 30 meters (50-100 feet), and in girth the snake was about like a "big barrel". She moved in a snake-like manner, although there were other information, and her body was in joints and resembled a string with buoys on them, like on fishing nets.

Akaana animal body parts flying creature wings

Akaana

A creature from Greek mythology with the face and chest of a woman and the body of a bird of prey.

Harpies (other-Greek. ἍΡπυιαι "abductors", "predators"), in ancient Greek mythology — half-women-half-birds, personifications of various aspects of the storm, archaic pre-Olympic deities.

  • Harpia is a creature from Greek mythology with the face and chest of a woman and the body of a bird of prey
  • Jungfraunadler is the German name for the harpy
  • Rapae is the Latin name for the harpy
  • Akaana is the African name for harpies based on Robert Howard's book Wings in the Night

In myths, they are represented by evil abductors of children and human souls, suddenly swooping in and disappearing as suddenly as the wind.

Asterius animal body parts anthropomorphic creature superpowered creature

Asterius

In Greek mythology, a half-wolf is a half-man.

According to Greek legend, the Minotaur is a mutant monster with the body of a man and the head of a bull, descended from the unnatural love of the daughter of Helios Pasiphae, the wife of King Minos, to Poseidon (in some sources Zeus), sent by the god of the seas the bull, which was then tamed by Hercules and killed by Theseus.

The Minotaur is significantly higher than any of all existing people. He was completely naked except for a torn loincloth. The Minotaur was extremely muscular and sturdy. But the most remarkable thing was the bull's head. His eyes gave off a strange fiery glow, and his horns were large and slightly curved. The monster's teeth looked more like the teeth of a predator than a bull. The constant attribute of the minotaur was his curved club and muscular arms.

Androsfinx animal body parts anthropomorphic creature pass the device or knowledge specifies the location of the treasure

Androsfinx

A creature from Egyptian mythology. Usually it is a creature with the head of a woman, the paws and body of a lion and the wings of an eagle.

However , in ancient Egypt there were three types of sphinxes:

  • androsphinx — with a lion's body and a human head; cryosphinx — with a ram's head and a human body; hieracosphinx — with a falcon's head and a human body.

He can point the way (skip) to the treasures or share knowledge. He is known as a lover of riddles.

African Gremlin anthropomorphic creature breaks technique flying objects hairy creature hurting people spontaneously moving objects tanypodinae creature turns into an animal turns into fog

African Gremlin

A creature from Zulu mythology. He appears to be an evil spirit, similar to a gnome (according to various beliefs, he can also resemble a zombie, poltergeist or gremlin), which can become invisible.

Tikoloshe are called by evil zamans to create problems for others: to scare children, cause illness or even death of the victim.

According to the shamans of the Mutwa Creed, the creatures are able to take on various forms from the appearance of a gremlin, to a humanoid creature similar to a bear.

According to legend, the only way to keep Tokoloshe away from you at night is to put a brick under each leg of your bed, although this will only protect the bed and what is on it, whereas Tokoloshe can blow everything around.

Arctic anthropomorphic creature hurting people restless spirit turns into a human

Arctic

There is a creature with this name in the mythology of the Eskimos and in the mythology of the Indians of North America.

It is also called Tornarsuk, Torngarsoak, Torngasoak, Tungrangayak, Torngarsuk, Torngarsuk, Innuit, Eskimo, Labrador, Arctic, Tornak, Tornatic, Torngarsok, Torngasok, Tungrangahuak.

His Latin names: Innuit. Eskimo. Labrador. Artic. Tornatik. Torngarsoak. Torngasoak. Tungrangayak. Torngarsuk.

Tornarsuk is the spirit of the realm of the dead and the head of the guardian spirits known as Tornat. This is the ruling spirit above Tornak (shaman's familiar). He is depicted as a bear, a tall one-armed man or a tiny figure. Some descriptions describe him as invisible. Some say that it has a body covered with eyes, or that it is a sea monster.

Propp is indicated that he steals the souls of shamans and has the appearance of a walrus with suckers. Nansen, analyzing the word itself, comes to the conclusion that it translates as a disgusting soul.

Apsat disproportionate body the little creature

Apsat

Short creatures from Eskimo folklore, representing large human heads on small legs. It is believed that they never enter the ice, under which there is no land, they can settle in an abandoned igloo, which was not cleaned by the previous owners when they left it.

Aching bone restless spirit sounds without visible sources

Aching bone

In the beliefs of the Kostroma region, the soul of unburied bones. She protects the body until the body is buried. It makes long-drawn howling sounds.

Al-Wak Tree a separate part of the body unusual sounds

Al-Wak Tree

In Arabic mythology, a tree with fruits in the form of human heads making articulate sounds. These sounds are considered by the locals to be a bad omen.

Angie anthropomorphic creature hairy creature high being superpowered creature

Angie

Bigfoot, yeti, sasquatch, bigfoot, engey, avdoshka, almasts - all these are the names of one kind of creatures that supposedly live in forests and mountains in different parts of the planet.

According to eyewitnesses, bigfoot looks like a large ape up to 3 meters tall, covered with dark brown, dark red or gray fur. This creature has large feet (the number of fingers varies from 2 to 6 from case to case). It is assumed that the creature moves well in a wooded area, climbs trees.

Geographically, the phenomenon is spread all over the world. Most often, residents of sparsely populated areas and mountains tell about it, but sometimes there are also reports from national parks and nature reserves.

The exact date of the phenomenon is unknown. Reports of creatures with a similar description have appeared over the past few centuries. However, in the old legends, one can also find a description of "a tall, overgrown man with hair, who is stronger and denser than an ordinary peasant, perhaps has the ability to influence people's consciousness, instilling powerful fear or forcing them not to notice their presence, and lives in the forest." So some eyewitnesses told about the meeting with the goblin.

Versions

As in the case of other similar phenomena, there are those who believe in bigfoot, and those who doubt his reality. Most modern scientists are skeptical about the possibility of the existence of a snowman, because, despite a lot of evidence, there are still no sufficient grounds to confirm the existence of someone new and unexplored.

Many versions have been collected explaining many stories of encounters with the Yeti.

Deliberate hoaxes. During periods of increased interest in the topic, there are a lot of deliberate falsifications associated with the phenomenon of bigfoot. These are not only the stories of "eyewitnesses", but also traces, photographs, wool, feces, etc. There can be many reasons for such actions, from confirming one's own theory to attracting attention.

Observer errors. Real animals (for example, a bear, because not only its appearance is similar, but also its fur and other traces of its presence are most often detected during research by scientists), and in some cases inanimate objects (the movement of plants in the wind, the play of light and shadows) could be taken for the yeti in conditions of poor visibility.

Folklore. Stories about bigfoot can be completely folklore fiction, modified and embellished with a real story or a story based on folklore.

Among those who believe in the existence of bigfoot, the most popular versions are that he is a mammal belonging to the order of primates and the genus of man, preserved to this day from prehistoric times, a creature of alien origin and even a time traveler or a guest from another dimension.

There is an opposite theory, according to which the yeti are feral people with mental disabilities.

Avdoshka anthropomorphic creature hairy creature high being superpowered creature

Avdoshka

Bigfoot, yeti, sasquatch, bigfoot, engey, avdoshka, almasts - all these are the names of one kind of creatures that supposedly live in forests and mountains in different parts of the planet.

According to eyewitnesses, bigfoot looks like a large ape up to 3 meters tall, covered with dark brown, dark red or gray fur. This creature has large feet (the number of fingers varies from 2 to 6 from case to case). It is assumed that the creature moves well in a wooded area, climbs trees.

Geographically, the phenomenon is spread all over the world. Most often, residents of sparsely populated areas and mountains tell about it, but sometimes there are also reports from national parks and nature reserves.

The exact date of the phenomenon is unknown. Reports of creatures with a similar description have appeared over the past few centuries. However, in the old legends, one can also find a description of "a tall, overgrown man with hair, who is stronger and denser than an ordinary peasant, perhaps has the ability to influence people's consciousness, instilling powerful fear or forcing them not to notice their presence, and lives in the forest." So some eyewitnesses told about the meeting with the goblin.

Versions

As in the case of other similar phenomena, there are those who believe in bigfoot, and those who doubt his reality. Most modern scientists are skeptical about the possibility of the existence of a snowman, because, despite a lot of evidence, there are still no sufficient grounds to confirm the existence of someone new and unexplored.

Many versions have been collected explaining many stories of encounters with the Yeti.

Deliberate hoaxes. During periods of increased interest in the topic, there are a lot of deliberate falsifications associated with the phenomenon of bigfoot. These are not only the stories of "eyewitnesses", but also traces, photographs, wool, feces, etc. There can be many reasons for such actions, from confirming one's own theory to attracting attention.

Observer errors. Real animals (for example, a bear, because not only its appearance is similar, but also its fur and other traces of its presence are most often detected during research by scientists), and in some cases inanimate objects (the movement of plants in the wind, the play of light and shadows) could be taken for the yeti in conditions of poor visibility.

Folklore. Stories about bigfoot can be completely folklore fiction, modified and embellished with a real story or a story based on folklore.

Among those who believe in the existence of bigfoot, the most popular versions are that he is a mammal belonging to the order of primates and the genus of man, preserved to this day from prehistoric times, a creature of alien origin and even a time traveler or a guest from another dimension.

There is an opposite theory, according to which the yeti are feral people with mental disabilities.

Almasts anthropomorphic creature hairy creature high being superpowered creature

Almasts

Bigfoot, yeti, sasquatch, bigfoot, engey, avdoshka, almasts - all these are the names of one kind of creatures that supposedly live in forests and mountains in different parts of the planet.

According to eyewitnesses, bigfoot looks like a large ape up to 3 meters tall, covered with dark brown, dark red or gray fur. This creature has large feet (the number of fingers varies from 2 to 6 from case to case). It is assumed that the creature moves well in a wooded area, climbs trees.

Geographically, the phenomenon is spread all over the world. Most often, residents of sparsely populated areas and mountains tell about it, but sometimes there are also reports from national parks and nature reserves.

The exact date of the phenomenon is unknown. Reports of creatures with a similar description have appeared over the past few centuries. However, in the old legends, one can also find a description of "a tall, overgrown man with hair, who is stronger and denser than an ordinary peasant, perhaps has the ability to influence people's consciousness, instilling powerful fear or forcing them not to notice their presence, and lives in the forest." So some eyewitnesses told about the meeting with the goblin.

Versions

As in the case of other similar phenomena, there are those who believe in bigfoot, and those who doubt his reality. Most modern scientists are skeptical about the possibility of the existence of a snowman, because, despite a lot of evidence, there are still no sufficient grounds to confirm the existence of someone new and unexplored.

Many versions have been collected explaining many stories of encounters with the Yeti.

Deliberate hoaxes. During periods of increased interest in the topic, there are a lot of deliberate falsifications associated with the phenomenon of bigfoot. These are not only the stories of "eyewitnesses", but also traces, photographs, wool, feces, etc. There can be many reasons for such actions, from confirming one's own theory to attracting attention.

Observer errors. Real animals (for example, a bear, because not only its appearance is similar, but also its fur and other traces of its presence are most often detected during research by scientists), and in some cases inanimate objects (the movement of plants in the wind, the play of light and shadows) could be taken for the yeti in conditions of poor visibility.

Folklore. Stories about bigfoot can be completely folklore fiction, modified and embellished with a real story or a story based on folklore.

Among those who believe in the existence of bigfoot, the most popular versions are that he is a mammal belonging to the order of primates and the genus of man, preserved to this day from prehistoric times, a creature of alien origin and even a time traveler or a guest from another dimension.

There is an opposite theory, according to which the yeti are feral people with mental disabilities.

Ayakashi anthropomorphic creature

Ayakashi

The common name of all (usually anthropomorphic) demons of Japanese folklore.

In Japanese, the word "yokai" has a very broad meaning and can mean almost all supernatural beings of Japanese mythology, or even borrowed from European. 

In modern usage, an approximate synonym for the word "yokai" isAyakashi (yap. 妖 Ayakashi, dosl. "Supernatural creature"). Previously, this was the name of the spirit that appears after a shipwreck, but now it means supernatural phenomena in general.

The concept of "yokai" came to Japan from China to denote a certain energy that permeates all living and inanimate, forcing them to exhibit amazing, inexplicable, mysterious properties. These properties , in turn , were also called yokai . Youkai was omnipresent and dangerous, as any element such as a tsunami, typhoon or lightning can be dangerous. However, over time, the concept has significantly narrowed and began to be used to name supernatural beings.

Types of youkai:

  • They (cannibal demons).
  • Mystical animals
  • Tsukumogami (animated objects)
  • Youkai, once human

There is a classification of youkai by habitat. They can be divided into 5 large groups:

  • Living in the mountains — these include the flying demons tengu and the witch Yamauba;
  • Living on the roadsides — for example, the one-eyed Hitotsume—kozo, the faceless nopperapon and the giant monster - mikosi nyudo;
  • Living in the house — brownie — dzashiki-varasi and the keeper of the barn — kura-bokko;
  • Living in reservoirs — this type includes both sea youkai — ghost ship - funayurei and iso—onna appearing on the seashore in female form - and river ones — water kappa; youkai of non—flowing waters — nusi. Amabie usually lives in seas or rivers, but can also appear in flood fields.
  • Among the moving, constantly changing their location, a horse without a head — kubikire-mind stands out especially.

B

Bregostene anthropomorphic creature water creature

Bregostene

Spirits are the patrons of alpine meadows and mountain springs from Celtic mythology. They were also mentioned in medieval European (in particular Italian) folklore.

Aguans wander through alpine meadows, swim in rivers and lakes and protect the purity of the water. They look like tall, beautiful women with long, loose hair.

People are friendly to people, but if a person muddies the water in a mountain spring, then they can drag a person under the water or lure him into caves and devour him there. The same punishment is reserved for rapists, because the Aguans do not forgive the abuse of women.

Sometimes they come to crowded places to talk and even help with homework. As a rule, they appear to people in the guise of ugly old women with goat hooves or feet turned backwards.

Blades anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Blades

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Baba Yaga anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body excessive thinness helps you find your way hurting people pass the device or knowledge the bare bones of the skeleton the transition to another world

Baba Yaga

A character of Slavic mythology. It is called: rus. Baba-yaga, Yaga, yaga-baba, egi-baba, yagaya, Yagishna, Yagabova, Egiboba; belor. Baba Yaga, Baba Yuga, Yaginya; bolg. Baba Yaga; Ukrainian Baba-Yazia, Yazia, Yazi-baba, Gadra; Polish. jędza, babojędza; czech. jezinka, Ježibaba "witch", "forest woman"; v.-Serb. baba jega; slovene. jaga baba, ježi baba.

Historian Petrukhin V.Ya. brings the Proto-Slavic yaga (*yga) closer to the designation of snakes, reptiles, which, in his opinion, indicates the chthonic origins of the image.

In Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga has several stable attributes: she can conjure, fly in a mortar, lives on the border of the forest in a hut on chicken legs (or propped up with pancakes), surrounded by a fence of human bones with skulls. She lures people to her. She pursues her victims in a mortar, driving her with a pestle and covering the trail with a broom (broom).

In the former Slavic lands Carinthia in Austria "Baba Yaga Pehtra" (German. Pechtrababajagen) is a ceremonial ritual character.

In fairy tales , she acts in three incarnations:

  • Yaga-bogatyrsha has a kladentsom sword and fights on equal terms with the bogatyrs.
  • Yaga the kidnapper steals children.
  • Yaga, the giver, greets the hero or heroine affably, treats her deliciously, soars in the bathhouse, gives useful advice, presents rich and wonderful gifts.

The appearance (bone leg, iron teeth, long gray hair, sagging breasts, the ability to smell someone else's, etc.) indicates a connection with demonic characters of another world, the dead (a hut as a domovina-coffin); attributes, occupations and supernatural abilities — a mortar and a pest, an oven (where she roasts the abducted) spinning, flying through the air in a mortar, on a broomstick — also refer to female mythological characters, witches. The image of Baba Yaga is associated with legends about the hero's transition to the other world.

Babadook anthropomorphic creature fire with no apparent source flying objects hurting people spontaneously moving objects the manipulation of objects at a distance unusual eye color

Babadook

The Babadook or Mr. Babadook is a creature from the 2014 Australian horror film. This character is not based on real legends. According to one version, his name is an anagram of "A Bad Book", according to another - a sound imitation of blows on the door, which are heard as "ba—ba-duk" or "ba-ba-duk-duk-duk" (it all starts with the fact that he knocks on the door three times).

For the first time this creature appeared in the 2005 short film "Monster", directed by Jennifer Ken. This is a low-budget black-and-white film, where the character appears in his usual, but more human form, although not directly called.

Its design belongs to the American artist and illustrator Alex Juhash. The babadook looks like an anthropomorphic creature with black circles under the eyes with a white iris, a huge mouth full of teeth, dressed in a black coat and hat.

It is a supernatural being that torments anyone who finds out about its existence. It is capable of causing poltergeist phenomena: doors open and close by themselves, foreign objects appear where they should not be (pieces of glass in food), sounds are heard without a visible source, someone pushes and even pulls a person.

The history of this spirit is as follows:

In one rather rich family in Anguilla there lived a boy whose name was Babadook. He was an excellent magician , some children and adults even considered him a magician .

But at one point strange things began to happen - the children began to return home crippled, and when they were asked what happened, they said that it was the babadook who forced them to walk on glass , beat them with sticks and threw stones. From that moment on, adults began to be wary of the boy and could even beat him, however, that's what they were doing. Even the babadook's parents began to join them. But it didn't get any better, even on the contrary, corpses of children began to be found on the playgrounds.

Now the whole town wanted the babadook killed. And one day the babadook 's father pulled himself together , went into the babadook 's room and began to strangle him . Babadook's last words were "But I just wanted to play,,.

But it didn 't end there , strange things began to happen in the house . Cabinets, doors began to open themselves, as well as objects that were put in one place suddenly turned out to be in another. And one day a terrible thing happened , the babadook 's father took a knife , cut all the family members and stabbed himself . The mother and father died on the spot and the sister died in the ambulance. She claimed it was a babadook because he came to her at night and talked to her in a strange gurgling voice.

Baijie animal body parts pass the device or knowledge predicts the future

Baijie

Baijie (kit. trad. 白,, upr. 白,, pinyin: Baí Zé) or Hakutaku (Japanese: 白?) — a fantastic creature of Chinese and Japanese folklore, a mythical chimera with a human face, with six or nine eyes all over her body, possessing exceptional wisdom, understanding human speech and able to foresee the future.

Boze animal body parts pass the device or knowledge predicts the future

Boze

Baijie (kit. trad. 白,, upr. 白,, pinyin: Baí Zé) or Hakutaku (Japanese: 白?) — a fantastic creature of Chinese and Japanese folklore, a mythical chimera with a human face, with six or nine eyes all over her body, possessing exceptional wisdom, understanding human speech and able to foresee the future.

Baka-dzori animated object makes you wander sounds without visible sources

Baka-dzori

In Japanese folklore, the kind of things that come to life is tsukumogami, arising from an old straw slipper. Usually it is a hundred-year-old slipper, forgotten in the pantry, which comes to life to protect its shoe brethren in those homes where shoes are poorly taken care of.

Able to scream at night (usually "Kararin, kororin, kankororin! Three eyes, three eyes, two tooth!" (jap. カラリン、コロリン、カンコロリン、まなぐ三つに歯二ん枚)).

If a person puts it on, then after a while he will catch himself walking aimlessly to no one knows where.

Bakezori animated object makes you wander sounds without visible sources

Bakezori

In Japanese folklore, the kind of things that come to life is tsukumogami, arising from an old straw slipper. Usually it is a hundred-year-old slipper, forgotten in the pantry, which comes to life to protect its shoe brethren in those homes where shoes are poorly taken care of.

Able to scream at night (usually "Kararin, kororin, kankororin! Three eyes, three eyes, two tooth!" (jap. カラリン、コロリン、カンコロリン、まなぐ三つに歯二ん枚)).

If a person puts it on, then after a while he will catch himself walking aimlessly to no one knows where.

Bake-kujira hurting people large creature restless spirit the bare bones of the skeleton the harbinger of death water creature

Bake-kujira

Bake-kujira, Bake-kujira and Hone-kujira are all names of a creature from Japanese mythology that looks like a ghostly skeleton of a whale.

He swims near fishing villages accompanied by strange, unprecedented and ugly fish and birds.

His appearance portends mass deaths, fires, famine, and so on, the youkai himself can curse some fisherman who sees him, and he, in turn, infects his entire village with a curse.

Baka-kujira hurting people large creature restless spirit the bare bones of the skeleton the harbinger of death water creature

Baka-kujira

Bake-kujira, Bake-kujira and Hone-kujira are all names of a creature from Japanese mythology that looks like a ghostly skeleton of a whale.

He swims near fishing villages accompanied by strange, unprecedented and ugly fish and birds.

His appearance portends mass deaths, fires, famine, and so on, the youkai himself can curse some fisherman who sees him, and he, in turn, infects his entire village with a curse.

Bakeneko turns into a human

Bakeneko

In Japan, it is believed that a long-tailed cat can become a werewolf over time. They can take the form of the deceased or inhabit his body. But even without this, the animal can walk on its hind legs and talk.In human form, bakeneko demonstrate superhuman flexibility, mobility and cunning.

There are several ways for a cat to become a bakeneko: According to Japanese folklore, any cat that has lived for more than thirteen years, either tricolor, or one that weighs 1 kan (3.75 kg), or has a long tail, can become a bakeneko. In the latter case, the tail is bifurcated; such a bakeneko is called a nekomata (yap. 猫又 or 猫股 forked cat).

Bakeneko can create ghostly fireballs, walk on her hind legs; she can eat her master and take his form. It was also believed that if such a cat jumped over a fresh corpse, it would revive it.

Bakeneko also preys on humans. He puts his huge paws in the door, looking for human prey, as ordinary cats do when they hunt at a mouse hole.

Often these creatures are depicted licking oil from lamps (in ancient lamps, oil was made from fish oil). Because of this, they can breathe fire.

Bakeneko turns into a human

Bakeneko

In Japan, it is believed that a long-tailed cat can become a werewolf over time. They can take the form of the deceased or inhabit his body. But even without this, the animal can walk on its hind legs and talk.In human form, bakeneko demonstrate superhuman flexibility, mobility and cunning.

There are several ways for a cat to become a bakeneko: According to Japanese folklore, any cat that has lived for more than thirteen years, either tricolor, or one that weighs 1 kan (3.75 kg), or has a long tail, can become a bakeneko. In the latter case, the tail is bifurcated; such a bakeneko is called a nekomata (yap. 猫又 or 猫股 forked cat).

Bakeneko can create ghostly fireballs, walk on her hind legs; she can eat her master and take his form. It was also believed that if such a cat jumped over a fresh corpse, it would revive it.

Bakeneko also preys on humans. He puts his huge paws in the door, looking for human prey, as ordinary cats do when they hunt at a mouse hole.

Often these creatures are depicted licking oil from lamps (in ancient lamps, oil was made from fish oil). Because of this, they can breathe fire.

Baka-neko turns into a human

Baka-neko

In Japan, it is believed that a long-tailed cat can become a werewolf over time. They can take the form of the deceased or inhabit his body. But even without this, the animal can walk on its hind legs and talk.In human form, bakeneko demonstrate superhuman flexibility, mobility and cunning.

There are several ways for a cat to become a bakeneko: According to Japanese folklore, any cat that has lived for more than thirteen years, either tricolor, or one that weighs 1 kan (3.75 kg), or has a long tail, can become a bakeneko. In the latter case, the tail is bifurcated; such a bakeneko is called a nekomata (yap. 猫又 or 猫股 forked cat).

Bakeneko can create ghostly fireballs, walk on her hind legs; she can eat her master and take his form. It was also believed that if such a cat jumped over a fresh corpse, it would revive it.

Bakeneko also preys on humans. He puts his huge paws in the door, looking for human prey, as ordinary cats do when they hunt at a mouse hole.

Often these creatures are depicted licking oil from lamps (in ancient lamps, oil was made from fish oil). Because of this, they can breathe fire.

Baku animal body parts

Baku

In Japanese folklore, supernatural beings devour dreams and nightmares. It is described as a chimera with the trunk of an elephant, the eyes of a rhinoceros, the tail of a bull and the paws of a tiger, protecting from evil and pestilence.

It comes from Chinese folklore and has been familiar to the Japanese since the Muromachi era (XIV-XV centuries).

According to popular belief, after waking up from heavy dreams, it was necessary to pronounce the spell three times: "Baku kurae!" — that is, "Baku, eat it!".

Despite their monstrous appearance, the Youkai of Baku are revered as powerful forces of good and as holy symbols of the defenders of humanity.

Balamuten sexual relations with the victim the manipulation of the actions of the victim the transition to another world water creature

Balamuten

A creature from Belarusian mythology. This is a dangerous water man with a puffy face, goose bumps and a huge belly. He is very loving, for which he kidnaps women: he casts a spell and takes it with him under the water. After playing enough, he returns it back, and the woman acquires the privilege of never drowning.

Balamutnya should be feared in the evening, as he is afraid of the sun.​​‌‌‌‌

Balamutnya can be considered a kind of special subspecies of water-incubus.

There is a Balamuten in every river. He's the one who turns whirlpools, messes up the water. He can be confused with an ordinary man, but there is something inhuman in his face. Maybe it's the eyes, or maybe it's the hair. In the evening, they say, he can come out of the water, but you will never see him in sunny weather. The Balamutnik is afraid of the sun, drought.

Balamutnik sexual relations with the victim the manipulation of the actions of the victim the transition to another world water creature

Balamutnik

A creature from Belarusian mythology. This is a dangerous water man with a puffy face, goose bumps and a huge belly. He is very loving, for which he kidnaps women: he casts a spell and takes it with him under the water. After playing enough, he returns it back, and the woman acquires the privilege of never drowning.

Balamutnya should be feared in the evening, as he is afraid of the sun.​​‌‌‌‌

Balamutnya can be considered a kind of special subspecies of water-incubus.

There is a Balamuten in every river. He's the one who turns whirlpools, messes up the water. He can be confused with an ordinary man, but there is something inhuman in his face. Maybe it's the eyes, or maybe it's the hair. In the evening, they say, he can come out of the water, but you will never see him in sunny weather. The Balamutnik is afraid of the sun, drought.

Balamutsen sexual relations with the victim the manipulation of the actions of the victim the transition to another world water creature

Balamutsen

A creature from Belarusian mythology. This is a dangerous water man with a puffy face, goose bumps and a huge belly. He is very loving, for which he kidnaps women: he casts a spell and takes it with him under the water. After playing enough, he returns it back, and the woman acquires the privilege of never drowning.

Balamutnya should be feared in the evening, as he is afraid of the sun.​​‌‌‌‌

Balamutnya can be considered a kind of special subspecies of water-incubus.

There is a Balamuten in every river. He's the one who turns whirlpools, messes up the water. He can be confused with an ordinary man, but there is something inhuman in his face. Maybe it's the eyes, or maybe it's the hair. In the evening, they say, he can come out of the water, but you will never see him in sunny weather. The Balamutnik is afraid of the sun, drought.

Banshee anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

Banshee

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Banshees anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

Banshees

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Bunchy anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

Bunchy

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Benshi anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

Benshi

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Boshenta anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

Boshenta

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Byte anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

Byte

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Bau anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

Bau

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Ben-Niye anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

Ben-Niye

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Barbegazi anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body hairy creature

Barbegazi

Creatures from Swiss and French mythology.

The name probably came from the French "barbes glacées" — "frozen beards".

He looks like a little man covered in white fur with a long beard and huge legs. He rides down the mountains on his huge feet as if on skis. 

The usual sounds they make when communicating are similar to the whistle of a groundhog. To communicate at a long distance, barbegazi emit an intimidating howl, which can be mistaken for the whistling of the wind or the sound of an Alpine horn.

During the summer months, barbegazi hibernate and come out of their burrows only in winter after the first heavy snowfalls.

They are usually friendly towards people, but try to avoid any possibility of meeting them. Some people living in this region claim that barbegazis help them a lot, but more often credit is given to St. Bernards.

Others believe that these small creatures warn of the approach of avalanches by whistling or howling.

Barbegazy anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body hairy creature

Barbegazy

Creatures from Swiss and French mythology.

The name probably came from the French "barbes glacées" — "frozen beards".

He looks like a little man covered in white fur with a long beard and huge legs. He rides down the mountains on his huge feet as if on skis. 

The usual sounds they make when communicating are similar to the whistle of a groundhog. To communicate at a long distance, barbegazi emit an intimidating howl, which can be mistaken for the whistling of the wind or the sound of an Alpine horn.

During the summer months, barbegazi hibernate and come out of their burrows only in winter after the first heavy snowfalls.

They are usually friendly towards people, but try to avoid any possibility of meeting them. Some people living in this region claim that barbegazis help them a lot, but more often credit is given to St. Bernards.

Others believe that these small creatures warn of the approach of avalanches by whistling or howling.

Barb-gracie anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body hairy creature

Barb-gracie

Creatures from Swiss and French mythology.

The name probably came from the French "barbes glacées" — "frozen beards".

He looks like a little man covered in white fur with a long beard and huge legs. He rides down the mountains on his huge feet as if on skis. 

The usual sounds they make when communicating are similar to the whistle of a groundhog. To communicate at a long distance, barbegazi emit an intimidating howl, which can be mistaken for the whistling of the wind or the sound of an Alpine horn.

During the summer months, barbegazi hibernate and come out of their burrows only in winter after the first heavy snowfalls.

They are usually friendly towards people, but try to avoid any possibility of meeting them. Some people living in this region claim that barbegazis help them a lot, but more often credit is given to St. Bernards.

Others believe that these small creatures warn of the approach of avalanches by whistling or howling.

Basilisk afraid of sunlight animal body parts

Basilisk

The idea of this creature came from Greek mythology (a small snake with a white spot on its head), but in medieval Europe it underwent some changes. There he turned into a monster with the body of a toad, the tail of a snake and the head of a rooster. His fetid breath kills everything in the neighborhood, and his gaze makes you petrify.

According to ancient belief, basilisks were born from the eggs of the ibis bird, which, feeding on the eggs of snakes, sometimes lays its own eggs through its beak. The English scientist Alexander Nekam (XII century.) in his essay wrote: ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

"Every time an old rooster lays an egg that a toad bears, a basilisk is born."

You can kill him by directing the sun's rays into his eyes with a mirror (there is a version that he will turn to stone when he sees his reflection in the mirror).

Basilisk (from others-Greek βᾰσῐλίσκος — king; also Lat. basiliscus, regulus, English basilisk, cockatrice).

Basilisk afraid of sunlight animal body parts

Basilisk

The idea of this creature came from Greek mythology (a small snake with a white spot on its head), but in medieval Europe it underwent some changes. There he turned into a monster with the body of a toad, the tail of a snake and the head of a rooster. His fetid breath kills everything in the neighborhood, and his gaze makes you petrify.

According to ancient belief, basilisks were born from the eggs of the ibis bird, which, feeding on the eggs of snakes, sometimes lays its own eggs through its beak. The English scientist Alexander Nekam (XII century.) in his essay wrote: ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

"Every time an old rooster lays an egg that a toad bears, a basilisk is born."

You can kill him by directing the sun's rays into his eyes with a mirror (there is a version that he will turn to stone when he sees his reflection in the mirror).

Basilisk (from others-Greek βᾰσῐλίσκος — king; also Lat. basiliscus, regulus, English basilisk, cockatrice).

Bathybat anthropomorphic creature choking victim large creature

Bathybat

A tree demon from Filipino folklore, a huge obese woman strangling the sleepers to death.

The bathybat takes the form of a huge, old, fat woman who lives in trees.

As a rule, they come into contact with people when the tree on which they live is cut down and turned into a support beam in the house. This causes them to move into the holes in this beam. The bathybat does not allow people to sleep next to her beam.

When a person does fall asleep next to this beam, the bathybat turns into its true form and attacks him. She sits on her victim's chest until he suffocates. To protect yourself from batibat, you need to bite your thumbs or wiggle your toes. Thus, a person wakes up from a nightmare.

Can change appearance at will.

Bangungot anthropomorphic creature choking victim large creature

Bangungot

A tree demon from Filipino folklore, a huge obese woman strangling the sleepers to death.

The bathybat takes the form of a huge, old, fat woman who lives in trees.

As a rule, they come into contact with people when the tree on which they live is cut down and turned into a support beam in the house. This causes them to move into the holes in this beam. The bathybat does not allow people to sleep next to her beam.

When a person does fall asleep next to this beam, the bathybat turns into its true form and attacks him. She sits on her victim's chest until he suffocates. To protect yourself from batibat, you need to bite your thumbs or wiggle your toes. Thus, a person wakes up from a nightmare.

Can change appearance at will.

Bedn-vara fish tail helps helps you find your way scales specifies the location of the treasure water creature

Bedn-vara

Aquatic creatures from the folklore of the inhabitants of the Isle of Man. She looks like a mermaid. Usually helps people: points to treasures, helps to swim out, warns about storms, etc., but if someone falls in love very much, he can drown them to be together forever.

Ben varra fish tail helps helps you find your way scales specifies the location of the treasure water creature

Ben varra

Aquatic creatures from the folklore of the inhabitants of the Isle of Man. She looks like a mermaid. Usually helps people: points to treasures, helps to swim out, warns about storms, etc., but if someone falls in love very much, he can drown them to be together forever.

Ben-Varri fish tail helps helps you find your way scales specifies the location of the treasure water creature

Ben-Varri

Aquatic creatures from the folklore of the inhabitants of the Isle of Man. She looks like a mermaid. Usually helps people: points to treasures, helps to swim out, warns about storms, etc., but if someone falls in love very much, he can drown them to be together forever.

Belun anthropomorphic creature helps helps to find the lost thing helps you find your way the glowing areas of the body

Belun

In Belarusian mythology, the field spirit (the personification of a lucky chance, A. N. Afanasyev compared Belun with Belobog (a West Slavic deity)) in the guise of a white-bearded old man surrounded by radiance.

He helped travelers find their way, pointed out treasures, guarded the harvest. It was believed that he, being in heaven, collects clouds with his staff and pierces them to shed rain.

Byalun anthropomorphic creature helps helps to find the lost thing helps you find your way the glowing areas of the body

Byalun

In Belarusian mythology, the field spirit (the personification of a lucky chance, A. N. Afanasyev compared Belun with Belobog (a West Slavic deity)) in the guise of a white-bearded old man surrounded by radiance.

He helped travelers find their way, pointed out treasures, guarded the harvest. It was believed that he, being in heaven, collects clouds with his staff and pierces them to shed rain.

Bichura anthropomorphic creature breaks technique flying objects helps hurting people sounds without visible sources the little creature

Bichura

The spirit from the mythology of the Kazan Tatars and Bashkirs.

Pӗҫuri is the name of a Bichura, a household spirit-enricher, among the Tatarstan Chuvash.

He looked like a little man in a red shirt. Usually such spirits lived in deep forests in clearings, but it could be brought home. In this case, he settled under the floor or in the bath.

They could be playing pranks: make noise, hide things, pile on sleeping people, scare them, but you could negotiate with them and then they helped to get rich.

In some ethnic groups of Zakamye, the term Bichura referred to spirits who were represented in the image of a small woman in an old headdress, an analogue of a bannitsa or a kikimora.

The scourge does not cause any significant harm to a person, but strongly and in different ways disturbs him at night: he shouts, plays, laughs, jokes, drags the sleeping person from place to place; things put in one place, hides in another.

Bisura anthropomorphic creature breaks technique flying objects helps hurting people sounds without visible sources the little creature

Bisura

The spirit from the mythology of the Kazan Tatars and Bashkirs.

Pӗҫuri is the name of a Bichura, a household spirit-enricher, among the Tatarstan Chuvash.

He looked like a little man in a red shirt. Usually such spirits lived in deep forests in clearings, but it could be brought home. In this case, he settled under the floor or in the bath.

They could be playing pranks: make noise, hide things, pile on sleeping people, scare them, but you could negotiate with them and then they helped to get rich.

In some ethnic groups of Zakamye, the term Bichura referred to spirits who were represented in the image of a small woman in an old headdress, an analogue of a bannitsa or a kikimora.

The scourge does not cause any significant harm to a person, but strongly and in different ways disturbs him at night: he shouts, plays, laughs, jokes, drags the sleeping person from place to place; things put in one place, hides in another.

Biera animated object hairy creature hurting people

Biera

Bjera (bjära, mjölkhare, trollhare, pukhare, puken, trollkatten, baran, bärarn, trollnøste, trollnøa — nesun, milk hare, witchy hare/cat/tangle — shv., fin., norv.) - a common name for all spirits-getters stealing neighbor's milk for their master in the South-the western regions of Sweden. ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​

The witch's familiar in Scandinavian folklore. In the form of a cat, a hare or a ball of yarn, she sucks milk from cows and spits it into the witches' milk containers, and also goes home and licks cream. 

The existence of a magical cat, apparently, is due to the fact that foreign objects (such as wool) were noticed in the belching of cattle, and slime molds and foam produced by insects were taken for its excrement.

Big Muddy anthropomorphic creature hairy creature large creature unusual sounds

Big Muddy

In the 1970s, in the southern part of Illinois (near the city of Murphysboro), a strange creature called the Big Mudd by locals was often noticed.

It is described as a large and very smelly creature that bears some resemblance to a yeti: a bipedal hairy creature, as tall as a man and covered from head to toe with dirty white fur, exuding a disgusting smell. The creature is capable of making terrible screams.

The first eyewitness was an 11-year-old boy.

Big Mudd anthropomorphic creature hairy creature large creature unusual sounds

Big Mudd

In the 1970s, in the southern part of Illinois (near the city of Murphysboro), a strange creature called the Big Mudd by locals was often noticed.

It is described as a large and very smelly creature that bears some resemblance to a yeti: a bipedal hairy creature, as tall as a man and covered from head to toe with dirty white fur, exuding a disgusting smell. The creature is capable of making terrible screams.

The first eyewitness was an 11-year-old boy.

Biiniao flying creature wings

Biiniao

Birds that joined their wings is a literal translation from the Chinese name Biinyao. These are Chinese lovebirds.

The Biinyao were represented as a wild duck with red-green plumage. Each bird had one wing, one leg and one eye. They could fly, eat and drink only by joining together in twos. Therefore, they always flew and rested in pairs. According to some sources, one of the birds was green, the other was red.

Because of their inseparability, the biinyao were considered a symbol of a happy marriage.

Bii-nao flying creature wings

Bii-nao

Birds that joined their wings is a literal translation from the Chinese name Biinyao. These are Chinese lovebirds.

The Biinyao were represented as a wild duck with red-green plumage. Each bird had one wing, one leg and one eye. They could fly, eat and drink only by joining together in twos. Therefore, they always flew and rested in pairs. According to some sources, one of the birds was green, the other was red.

Because of their inseparability, the biinyao were considered a symbol of a happy marriage.

Biiniao flying creature wings

Biiniao

Birds that joined their wings is a literal translation from the Chinese name Biinyao. These are Chinese lovebirds.

The Biinyao were represented as a wild duck with red-green plumage. Each bird had one wing, one leg and one eye. They could fly, eat and drink only by joining together in twos. Therefore, they always flew and rested in pairs. According to some sources, one of the birds was green, the other was red.

Because of their inseparability, the biinyao were considered a symbol of a happy marriage.

Biy-nao flying creature wings

Biy-nao

Birds that joined their wings is a literal translation from the Chinese name Biinyao. These are Chinese lovebirds.

The Biinyao were represented as a wild duck with red-green plumage. Each bird had one wing, one leg and one eye. They could fly, eat and drink only by joining together in twos. Therefore, they always flew and rested in pairs. According to some sources, one of the birds was green, the other was red.

Because of their inseparability, the biinyao were considered a symbol of a happy marriage.

Birds that joined their wings flying creature wings

Birds that joined their wings

Birds that joined their wings is a literal translation from the Chinese name Biinyao. These are Chinese lovebirds.

The Biinyao were represented as a wild duck with red-green plumage. Each bird had one wing, one leg and one eye. They could fly, eat and drink only by joining together in twos. Therefore, they always flew and rested in pairs. According to some sources, one of the birds was green, the other was red.

Because of their inseparability, the biinyao were considered a symbol of a happy marriage.

Bilviz anthropomorphic creature hurting people makes you wander

Bilviz

A creature from German folklore. 

Variants of the spelling of the names of Bilvises: Belewitte, Bilwis, Bilwiß, Bilwitz, Bilwiz, Bulwechs, Pilbis, Pilbiz, Pilwiz.

They were represented in the guise of men wearing linen clothes and dark brown cocked hats, and sickles grew on the thumbs of their left feet instead of nails. They live in flocks in tree hollows and in fields. They lead a nocturnal lifestyle, only with the onset of evening these creatures come out of their hiding places.

They are accompanied by their spouses, the so-called roggenmeme - "rye aunts", who walk naked, showing their black breasts, from whose nipples poisonous milk oozes.

The creatures ravage fields, tease and harass people, and can even cause paralysis or make a person wander.

To protect yourself from them, before going out into the field, you should throw a knife with three scratches on the handle to the ground and shout: "Hold on, bilviz!" Bilviz will be afraid of the knife and run away.

Bulvehi anthropomorphic creature hurting people makes you wander

Bulvehi

A creature from German folklore. 

Variants of the spelling of the names of Bilvises: Belewitte, Bilwis, Bilwiß, Bilwitz, Bilwiz, Bulwechs, Pilbis, Pilbiz, Pilwiz.

They were represented in the guise of men wearing linen clothes and dark brown cocked hats, and sickles grew on the thumbs of their left feet instead of nails. They live in flocks in tree hollows and in fields. They lead a nocturnal lifestyle, only with the onset of evening these creatures come out of their hiding places.

They are accompanied by their spouses, the so-called roggenmeme - "rye aunts", who walk naked, showing their black breasts, from whose nipples poisonous milk oozes.

The creatures ravage fields, tease and harass people, and can even cause paralysis or make a person wander.

To protect yourself from them, before going out into the field, you should throw a knife with three scratches on the handle to the ground and shout: "Hold on, bilviz!" Bilviz will be afraid of the knife and run away.

Black Annis anthropomorphic creature

Black Annis

A character from the local village legends of central England, a cannibal witch with a blue face and iron claws. Attacked the victim from a tree and devoured.

Black Agnes anthropomorphic creature

Black Agnes

A character from the local village legends of central England, a cannibal witch with a blue face and iron claws. Attacked the victim from a tree and devoured.

Black Ennis anthropomorphic creature

Black Ennis

A character from the local village legends of central England, a cannibal witch with a blue face and iron claws. Attacked the victim from a tree and devoured.

Bochy animal body parts water creature

Bochy

A Chinese monster from the Catalog of Mountains and Seas, a ram with nine tails and four ears, as well as two eyes on its back.

The name of the creature differs in different editions of the book: in the first edition of 1965 — it is called Fato, in the second, 1987 — Futo.It is difficult to say whether Fato is the same Bochi, or they are different creatures, but the similarity of the texts is obvious.​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Bogey glowing eyes turns into an animal

Bogey

Creatures from the folklore of Great Britain. These are werewolf spirits that turn into black dogs. To make fun of a person, they can turn into a haystack, and into an untethered cow, and into a pot of gold.

They have cold and wet fingers, as well as glowing yellow eyes in the dark. They do not tolerate criminals and punish thieves, murderers and deceivers.

Usually bogies live alone, but sometimes they gather in company.

Bogles glowing eyes turns into an animal

Bogles

Creatures from the folklore of Great Britain. These are werewolf spirits that turn into black dogs. To make fun of a person, they can turn into a haystack, and into an untethered cow, and into a pot of gold.

They have cold and wet fingers, as well as glowing yellow eyes in the dark. They do not tolerate criminals and punish thieves, murderers and deceivers.

Usually bogies live alone, but sometimes they gather in company.

Bolotnik anthropomorphic creature hairy creature long limbs the distortion of time water creature

Bolotnik

The evil spirit is the master of the swamp in East Slavic mythology. The female version is called bolotnitsa. 

Other names: bolotny, bolotny dedko, the fool of the swamp, the swamp devil, the swamp goblin, the king of the swamp, the swamp; as well as antsybal /antsibul /antsibalka /antsibolit / anchibal/ anchibol, zybochnik, kochechny, omutny; belor. balotnik; Ukrainian bolotyanik, antsibol, netecha[, ocheretyanik (from ocheret — "reed"). 

Antsybal — according to one version is a long-standing borrowing from the Baltic languages, comparable to Lit. ančiabalis — "duck swamp"; according to another version, this is a borrowing of the Czech ančibél, which could be the result of contamination of the words antikrist — "antichrist", and d'abel — "devil", and the convergence of the end part with the swamp occurred later; according to the third version, this is the result of the contraction of the expressions antichrist swamp, antip swamp, antiy bolotny through the intermediate antsibolotnik and antsibolot.

In the Russian North, they usually talked about the female spirit of the swamp, its mistress, the mistress of the tundra — the swamp woman, the swamp woman.

Often, the spirit living in the swamp was considered just a kind of water, a goblin or a devil, and the image of a swamp girl was mixed with the images of a leshachiha, a "free old woman", a mermaid, a water woman and a swamp kikimora.

The appearance of the swampman: a dirty, fat, eyeless creature sitting motionless at the bottom of the swamp, similar to a shaggy man with long arms and a tail. Sometimes it is a shaggy man with long arms and a tail.

It was believed that the swampman and the swamp woman lure a person or animal into a quagmire, where he dies.

Any sounds of the swamp were attributed to the swampman: to lure a person, he quacks like a duck, gurgles like a grouse, roars like a cow (the voice of a drink), moans or laughs (the voices of a white partridge and a snipe on the current).

Also, the swamper, in order to lure the traveler, lights lights in the swamp at night and grows flowers with an alluring aroma.

Bolotny anthropomorphic creature hairy creature long limbs the distortion of time water creature

Bolotny

The evil spirit is the master of the swamp in East Slavic mythology. The female version is called bolotnitsa. 

Other names: bolotny, bolotny dedko, the fool of the swamp, the swamp devil, the swamp goblin, the king of the swamp, the swamp; as well as antsybal /antsibul /antsibalka /antsibolit / anchibal/ anchibol, zybochnik, kochechny, omutny; belor. balotnik; Ukrainian bolotyanik, antsibol, netecha[, ocheretyanik (from ocheret — "reed"). 

Antsybal — according to one version is a long-standing borrowing from the Baltic languages, comparable to Lit. ančiabalis — "duck swamp"; according to another version, this is a borrowing of the Czech ančibél, which could be the result of contamination of the words antikrist — "antichrist", and d'abel — "devil", and the convergence of the end part with the swamp occurred later; according to the third version, this is the result of the contraction of the expressions antichrist swamp, antip swamp, antiy bolotny through the intermediate antsibolotnik and antsibolot.

In the Russian North, they usually talked about the female spirit of the swamp, its mistress, the mistress of the tundra — the swamp woman, the swamp woman.

Often, the spirit living in the swamp was considered just a kind of water, a goblin or a devil, and the image of a swamp girl was mixed with the images of a leshachiha, a "free old woman", a mermaid, a water woman and a swamp kikimora.

The appearance of the swampman: a dirty, fat, eyeless creature sitting motionless at the bottom of the swamp, similar to a shaggy man with long arms and a tail. Sometimes it is a shaggy man with long arms and a tail.

It was believed that the swampman and the swamp woman lure a person or animal into a quagmire, where he dies.

Any sounds of the swamp were attributed to the swampman: to lure a person, he quacks like a duck, gurgles like a grouse, roars like a cow (the voice of a drink), moans or laughs (the voices of a white partridge and a snipe on the current).

Also, the swamper, in order to lure the traveler, lights lights in the swamp at night and grows flowers with an alluring aroma.

Bolotny dedko anthropomorphic creature hairy creature long limbs the distortion of time water creature

Bolotny dedko

The evil spirit is the master of the swamp in East Slavic mythology. The female version is called bolotnitsa. 

Other names: bolotny, bolotny dedko, the fool of the swamp, the swamp devil, the swamp goblin, the king of the swamp, the swamp; as well as antsybal /antsibul /antsibalka /antsibolit / anchibal/ anchibol, zybochnik, kochechny, omutny; belor. balotnik; Ukrainian bolotyanik, antsibol, netecha[, ocheretyanik (from ocheret — "reed"). 

Antsybal — according to one version is a long-standing borrowing from the Baltic languages, comparable to Lit. ančiabalis — "duck swamp"; according to another version, this is a borrowing of the Czech ančibél, which could be the result of contamination of the words antikrist — "antichrist", and d'abel — "devil", and the convergence of the end part with the swamp occurred later; according to the third version, this is the result of the contraction of the expressions antichrist swamp, antip swamp, antiy bolotny through the intermediate antsibolotnik and antsibolot.

In the Russian North, they usually talked about the female spirit of the swamp, its mistress, the mistress of the tundra — the swamp woman, the swamp woman.

Often, the spirit living in the swamp was considered just a kind of water, a goblin or a devil, and the image of a swamp girl was mixed with the images of a leshachiha, a "free old woman", a mermaid, a water woman and a swamp kikimora.

The appearance of the swampman: a dirty, fat, eyeless creature sitting motionless at the bottom of the swamp, similar to a shaggy man with long arms and a tail. Sometimes it is a shaggy man with long arms and a tail.

It was believed that the swampman and the swamp woman lure a person or animal into a quagmire, where he dies.

Any sounds of the swamp were attributed to the swampman: to lure a person, he quacks like a duck, gurgles like a grouse, roars like a cow (the voice of a drink), moans or laughs (the voices of a white partridge and a snipe on the current).

Also, the swamper, in order to lure the traveler, lights lights in the swamp at night and grows flowers with an alluring aroma.

Bolotyanik anthropomorphic creature hairy creature long limbs the distortion of time water creature

Bolotyanik

The evil spirit is the master of the swamp in East Slavic mythology. The female version is called bolotnitsa. 

Other names: bolotny, bolotny dedko, the fool of the swamp, the swamp devil, the swamp goblin, the king of the swamp, the swamp; as well as antsybal /antsibul /antsibalka /antsibolit / anchibal/ anchibol, zybochnik, kochechny, omutny; belor. balotnik; Ukrainian bolotyanik, antsibol, netecha[, ocheretyanik (from ocheret — "reed"). 

Antsybal — according to one version is a long-standing borrowing from the Baltic languages, comparable to Lit. ančiabalis — "duck swamp"; according to another version, this is a borrowing of the Czech ančibél, which could be the result of contamination of the words antikrist — "antichrist", and d'abel — "devil", and the convergence of the end part with the swamp occurred later; according to the third version, this is the result of the contraction of the expressions antichrist swamp, antip swamp, antiy bolotny through the intermediate antsibolotnik and antsibolot.

In the Russian North, they usually talked about the female spirit of the swamp, its mistress, the mistress of the tundra — the swamp woman, the swamp woman.

Often, the spirit living in the swamp was considered just a kind of water, a goblin or a devil, and the image of a swamp girl was mixed with the images of a leshachiha, a "free old woman", a mermaid, a water woman and a swamp kikimora.

The appearance of the swampman: a dirty, fat, eyeless creature sitting motionless at the bottom of the swamp, similar to a shaggy man with long arms and a tail. Sometimes it is a shaggy man with long arms and a tail.

It was believed that the swampman and the swamp woman lure a person or animal into a quagmire, where he dies.

Any sounds of the swamp were attributed to the swampman: to lure a person, he quacks like a duck, gurgles like a grouse, roars like a cow (the voice of a drink), moans or laughs (the voices of a white partridge and a snipe on the current).

Also, the swamper, in order to lure the traveler, lights lights in the swamp at night and grows flowers with an alluring aroma.

Border Guard a small light at the earth's surface changes form fire with no apparent source restless spirit the glowing areas of the body turns into a human

Border Guard

On the territory of Poland, Germany and Lithuania, the so-called cursed souls of dishonest surveyors. The creature can take on various disguises from a bright light flying between the grasses to people with glowing limbs or a lantern in their hands.

Bosorka anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood hurting people it feeds on life energy the harbinger of death turns into an animal turns into fog

Bosorka

Mythological character of the peoples Carpathians (Hungarians, Romanians, Slavs), a witch or sorcerer with vampire traits. It can be recognized by the tail on the trunk, on the head or behind the ear. 

The word has Hungarian origin, in Hungarian it, in turn, could have come from the Turkic languages, cf. Turk. basyrkan — "nightmare". In Hungarian, Weng. boszorkány, boszorka — "witch", "sorceress", "spirit of the deceased", "bogeyman", "night ghost"

They can turn into a hare, a dog, a wolf, a fish, a bird. The midwife had to determine what kind of animal the bosorka would turn into. To transform into an animal, it was enough for a barefoot to just whistle.

It was believed that they steal milk from cows, suck blood from humans and cattle, and try to pierce them with an arrow. They are also characterized by sending damage, diseases, death, the evil eye, leading people astray and other leprosy.

It is believed that bosorkoy becomes:

  • a child born in a "shirt";
  • a living adult;
  • the dead man (so that the dead man does not become a barefoot, they advised to put garlic in his mouth, and he himself is face down in a coffin).
Bosorkan anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood hurting people it feeds on life energy the harbinger of death turns into an animal turns into fog

Bosorkan

Mythological character of the peoples Carpathians (Hungarians, Romanians, Slavs), a witch or sorcerer with vampire traits. It can be recognized by the tail on the trunk, on the head or behind the ear. 

The word has Hungarian origin, in Hungarian it, in turn, could have come from the Turkic languages, cf. Turk. basyrkan — "nightmare". In Hungarian, Weng. boszorkány, boszorka — "witch", "sorceress", "spirit of the deceased", "bogeyman", "night ghost"

They can turn into a hare, a dog, a wolf, a fish, a bird. The midwife had to determine what kind of animal the bosorka would turn into. To transform into an animal, it was enough for a barefoot to just whistle.

It was believed that they steal milk from cows, suck blood from humans and cattle, and try to pierce them with an arrow. They are also characterized by sending damage, diseases, death, the evil eye, leading people astray and other leprosy.

It is believed that bosorkoy becomes:

  • a child born in a "shirt";
  • a living adult;
  • the dead man (so that the dead man does not become a barefoot, they advised to put garlic in his mouth, and he himself is face down in a coffin).
Bosorka anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood hurting people it feeds on life energy the harbinger of death turns into an animal turns into fog

Bosorka

Mythological character of the peoples Carpathians (Hungarians, Romanians, Slavs), a witch or sorcerer with vampire traits. It can be recognized by the tail on the trunk, on the head or behind the ear. 

The word has Hungarian origin, in Hungarian it, in turn, could have come from the Turkic languages, cf. Turk. basyrkan — "nightmare". In Hungarian, Weng. boszorkány, boszorka — "witch", "sorceress", "spirit of the deceased", "bogeyman", "night ghost"

They can turn into a hare, a dog, a wolf, a fish, a bird. The midwife had to determine what kind of animal the bosorka would turn into. To transform into an animal, it was enough for a barefoot to just whistle.

It was believed that they steal milk from cows, suck blood from humans and cattle, and try to pierce them with an arrow. They are also characterized by sending damage, diseases, death, the evil eye, leading people astray and other leprosy.

It is believed that bosorkoy becomes:

  • a child born in a "shirt";
  • a living adult;
  • the dead man (so that the dead man does not become a barefoot, they advised to put garlic in his mouth, and he himself is face down in a coffin).
Botukan Sovil helps

Botukan Sovil

A house spirit living in a barn, from the Highlands of Scotland, who, pitying the infirm old men, threshed grain for them.

Boxes . anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body the little creature

Boxes .

In Japanese folklore, dwarfs are dwarfs with long arms, crooked legs and unkempt beards.

It is believed that the Korobokuru came to Japanese folklore from the Ainu (the oldest population of the Japanese Islands, to

Kamchatka, Sakhalin, Kuril). The Ainu believed that the Koropokkuru inhabited their lands before their arrival. They were skilled fishermen, lived underground (in pits) and under the stems of a mother-and-stepmother or a squirrel. Korobokuru were considered kamu (spirits, deities) of plants (the word itself is made up of the Ainu kor/koro — "squirrel", pok — "under" and kur/kuru — "man").

Brooks anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood flying creature restless spirit translucent turns into an animal

Brooks

In mythology Latin America and Portugal, an exclusively female being, into which a woman who was engaged in witchcraft during her lifetime turns after death.

According to another version, this is a werewolf witch. During the day, it is impossible to distinguish her from an ordinary woman (sometimes even married). At night, she turns into a ghost bird, attacks people and sucks their blood. It is impossible to kill Brooks.

Brox anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood flying creature restless spirit translucent turns into an animal

Brox

In mythology Latin America and Portugal, an exclusively female being, into which a woman who was engaged in witchcraft during her lifetime turns after death.

According to another version, this is a werewolf witch. During the day, it is impossible to distinguish her from an ordinary woman (sometimes even married). At night, she turns into a ghost bird, attacks people and sucks their blood. It is impossible to kill Brooks.

Brosha anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood flying creature restless spirit translucent turns into an animal

Brosha

In mythology Latin America and Portugal, an exclusively female being, into which a woman who was engaged in witchcraft during her lifetime turns after death.

According to another version, this is a werewolf witch. During the day, it is impossible to distinguish her from an ordinary woman (sometimes even married). At night, she turns into a ghost bird, attacks people and sucks their blood. It is impossible to kill Brooks.

Bruja anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood flying creature restless spirit translucent turns into an animal

Bruja

In mythology Latin America and Portugal, an exclusively female being, into which a woman who was engaged in witchcraft during her lifetime turns after death.

According to another version, this is a werewolf witch. During the day, it is impossible to distinguish her from an ordinary woman (sometimes even married). At night, she turns into a ghost bird, attacks people and sucks their blood. It is impossible to kill Brooks.

Brownie anthropomorphic creature changes form choking victim hairy creature helps helps to find the lost thing hurting people predicts the future turns into an animal

Brownie

The house of the Slavic peoples is called the mythological spirit - the owner and patron of the house. The image of the brownie in the representations of the Slavs is known primarily from folk tales and epics recorded in the XVIII-XX centuries, but a similar spirit is found in the mythologies of different peoples, regardless of the habitat and common beliefs.

As a rule, it is believed that the spirit of a deceased ancestor becomes the patron of the house. This is typical for many peoples: for the ancient Greeks, where the keepers of the house and hearth were called geniuses, and for the Romans, who called the patron gods of the hearth penates, for the Chinese, Slavs, etc.

Among the Eastern Slavs , the house is most often called:

  • by habitat: rus. domovoy, domovoiko, domovoy grandfather, belor. damavik, domnik, khatnik, ukr. brownie;
  • by location in the house: rus. golbeshnik (golbets — partition behind the oven), zapechnik, belor. podpechnik.
  • according to his status in the house and relations with family members: rus. the owner, the izbyan bolshak, the grandfather-brother, the bro, the dobrohotushko, the shaggy hostess; belor. ladies' khazyain, the lord, the biggest, uncle, brother, grandfather, sioiski; ukr. khazyain, did, bogatir,
  • according to the main functions and manifestations: rus. breadwinner, zhirovik, brush, lizun, ukr. gurkalo.
  • according to his belonging to the evil spirit: Rus. dashing, the other half, fat devil, belor. damn damavy, not your spirit, likhadzei, ukr. domoviy, dyabel, unclean.

The names of the brownie can be taboo: rus. himself, he, often with the help of metathesis: rus. modoveyko, modozhirko, ukr. dombeyko.

The corresponding female characters are named: rus. domovikha, modovikha, domovilikha, domakha, mistress.

In Polesie, especially in the west, names characteristic of evil spirits in general were often used in relation to the brownie (domovik): Satan, crafty, evil spirit, filth, enemy, nyachystik, lyakailo, puzhalo, nachnik, unkind soul, dead man, death, "that, shcho pamer", witch doctor, koydunnik.

Synonyms are: Brownie; Brownie; Grandfather; Posten; Posten; Lizun; Domozhil; Owner; Zhirovik; Undead; Susedko; Bratanushko; Guardian Spirit; Abuser of the house; Baked; Podpechnik; Podpolnik; Golbeshnik.

Among the Western Slavs, the brownie was more often represented as a snake and was called domowy, ubożę, stwor, chobold, kobold, kłobuk, karzełek skrzat, inkluz, plonek, latawiec, domownik, stopan, żmij, chowaniec.

  • Czech: Dědek, had hospodáříček, had domovníček (the snake lives under the threshold of the house and brings good luck)
  • Slovak: Domovik
  • Polish: Domowoj, domowik, dziad, vygorishche
  • at luzhichan: nócnénědky

The Southern Slavs:

  • Serbian: domaћi usluzhni duh, maliћ, maciћ, doma,i, škrat or shpiritus. In Bosnia and Banate could be called a "domestic imp" (Serbo-Croatian. kuћni ђavolak)
  • Bulgarian: stopan
  • Croatian: Domaći
  • Slovenian: Domovoj

There are different variants of the origin of faith in the brownie. There is an assumption that it originates from those times when a "construction sacrifice" was laid in the foundation of a new building. Initially they were people, later animals were sacrificed. According to another theory, the idea of the patron spirit of the house appeared as a result of the pagan cult of ancestors.

On the territory of Russia, with the advent of Christianity, the brownie began to be considered a demon, like other pagan deities. To get rid of it, it was necessary to consecrate the house. On the territory of Ukraine and Belarus, on the contrary, the brownie eventually became considered a good spirit sent by God to protect the house. This is confirmed by the ideas about possible clashes of the brownie with the bannik, the goblin and other "evil" spirits.

It is not difficult to guess that most often the hearth is considered the domovoi's place of residence, but it can also live in the red corner, the basement, in the attic and even under the threshold.

The appearance of the brownie, judging by the descriptions of eyewitnesses, can also be different. He usually appears to be a shaggy creature of small stature. Sometimes it has animal features, but more often it looks like an ordinary short person. He can also take the form of any family member (especially absent), an animal (most often snakes, weasels, cats, roosters, rats).

Usually a brownie is considered a male being, but along with the male image of a brownie, there is also a female one. Usually this is the wife (domovikha) and daughter (domovinka) of a brownie.

The brownie often appears in the stories of eyewitnesses in various manifestations:

Noisy spirit. Poltergeist phenomena are often associated with a brownie. According to some ideas, he can slam doors, creak floorboards, scream, groan, talk and even hit and pinch a person. This may be due to both the bad character of the brownie, and the fact that usually a good brownie is not happy with something (swearing, disorder, bad relations with children or animals, etc.). A less popular version explains such phenomena by the struggle of the brownie with an evil spirit trying to get into the house.

The predictor. It is believed that a brownie is able to predict the future to the owners of the house: usually he approaches a sleeping person and leans on his chest so that he can neither breathe nor move, and if at this moment he asks the brownie "for better or for worse?", then he will answer. Scientists explain this condition by sleep paralysis.

Hiding things. Another action closely associated with the brownie is the loss of things. If a person cannot find some thing that is usually lying in a prominent place, then it is considered that a brownie took it. To find a thing, it is customary to say: "brownie-brownie, play and give it away!". Another way is to turn the stool over and tie a handkerchief on its leg. After these manipulations, the thing should be found.

The image of the brownie described in this article refers not only to the patron of the house itself, but also to the patron spirits of other buildings. In the representations of some (mostly living in the north) peoples, the brownie is "divided" into characters-doubles, individual owners of each building or even each functional space of the house (a baking dish, a podpechnik, a golbeshnik - a spirit living behind the stove or under it; an underground worker - a spirit living underground; etc.).

The image described here was deformed under the influence of changes in people's everyday life. So, in private houses, the brownie moves not only around the house, but can also look into the barn, chicken coop, backyard. In the manor houses, the brownie was in charge of all the houses of the farmstead. According to modern ideas, a brownie can live not only in a residential building (each apartment has its own), but also in a garage, shed and even in an office.

Brownie anthropomorphic creature changes form choking victim hairy creature helps helps to find the lost thing hurting people predicts the future turns into an animal

Brownie

The house of the Slavic peoples is called the mythological spirit - the owner and patron of the house. The image of the brownie in the representations of the Slavs is known primarily from folk tales and epics recorded in the XVIII-XX centuries, but a similar spirit is found in the mythologies of different peoples, regardless of the habitat and common beliefs.

As a rule, it is believed that the spirit of a deceased ancestor becomes the patron of the house. This is typical for many peoples: for the ancient Greeks, where the keepers of the house and hearth were called geniuses, and for the Romans, who called the patron gods of the hearth penates, for the Chinese, Slavs, etc.

Among the Eastern Slavs , the house is most often called:

  • by habitat: rus. domovoy, domovoiko, domovoy grandfather, belor. damavik, domnik, khatnik, ukr. brownie;
  • by location in the house: rus. golbeshnik (golbets — partition behind the oven), zapechnik, belor. podpechnik.
  • according to his status in the house and relations with family members: rus. the owner, the izbyan bolshak, the grandfather-brother, the bro, the dobrohotushko, the shaggy hostess; belor. ladies' khazyain, the lord, the biggest, uncle, brother, grandfather, sioiski; ukr. khazyain, did, bogatir,
  • according to the main functions and manifestations: rus. breadwinner, zhirovik, brush, lizun, ukr. gurkalo.
  • according to his belonging to the evil spirit: Rus. dashing, the other half, fat devil, belor. damn damavy, not your spirit, likhadzei, ukr. domoviy, dyabel, unclean.

The names of the brownie can be taboo: rus. himself, he, often with the help of metathesis: rus. modoveyko, modozhirko, ukr. dombeyko.

The corresponding female characters are named: rus. domovikha, modovikha, domovilikha, domakha, mistress.

In Polesie, especially in the west, names characteristic of evil spirits in general were often used in relation to the brownie (domovik): Satan, crafty, evil spirit, filth, enemy, nyachystik, lyakailo, puzhalo, nachnik, unkind soul, dead man, death, "that, shcho pamer", witch doctor, koydunnik.

Synonyms are: Brownie; Brownie; Grandfather; Posten; Posten; Lizun; Domozhil; Owner; Zhirovik; Undead; Susedko; Bratanushko; Guardian Spirit; Abuser of the house; Baked; Podpechnik; Podpolnik; Golbeshnik.

Among the Western Slavs, the brownie was more often represented as a snake and was called domowy, ubożę, stwor, chobold, kobold, kłobuk, karzełek skrzat, inkluz, plonek, latawiec, domownik, stopan, żmij, chowaniec.

  • Czech: Dědek, had hospodáříček, had domovníček (the snake lives under the threshold of the house and brings good luck)
  • Slovak: Domovik
  • Polish: Domowoj, domowik, dziad, vygorishche
  • at luzhichan: nócnénědky

The Southern Slavs:

  • Serbian: domaћi usluzhni duh, maliћ, maciћ, doma,i, škrat or shpiritus. In Bosnia and Banate could be called a "domestic imp" (Serbo-Croatian. kuћni ђavolak)
  • Bulgarian: stopan
  • Croatian: Domaći
  • Slovenian: Domovoj

There are different variants of the origin of faith in the brownie. There is an assumption that it originates from those times when a "construction sacrifice" was laid in the foundation of a new building. Initially they were people, later animals were sacrificed. According to another theory, the idea of the patron spirit of the house appeared as a result of the pagan cult of ancestors.

On the territory of Russia, with the advent of Christianity, the brownie began to be considered a demon, like other pagan deities. To get rid of it, it was necessary to consecrate the house. On the territory of Ukraine and Belarus, on the contrary, the brownie eventually became considered a good spirit sent by God to protect the house. This is confirmed by the ideas about possible clashes of the brownie with the bannik, the goblin and other "evil" spirits.

It is not difficult to guess that most often the hearth is considered the domovoi's place of residence, but it can also live in the red corner, the basement, in the attic and even under the threshold.

The appearance of the brownie, judging by the descriptions of eyewitnesses, can also be different. He usually appears to be a shaggy creature of small stature. Sometimes it has animal features, but more often it looks like an ordinary short person. He can also take the form of any family member (especially absent), an animal (most often snakes, weasels, cats, roosters, rats).

Usually a brownie is considered a male being, but along with the male image of a brownie, there is also a female one. Usually this is the wife (domovikha) and daughter (domovinka) of a brownie.

The brownie often appears in the stories of eyewitnesses in various manifestations:

Noisy spirit. Poltergeist phenomena are often associated with a brownie. According to some ideas, he can slam doors, creak floorboards, scream, groan, talk and even hit and pinch a person. This may be due to both the bad character of the brownie, and the fact that usually a good brownie is not happy with something (swearing, disorder, bad relations with children or animals, etc.). A less popular version explains such phenomena by the struggle of the brownie with an evil spirit trying to get into the house.

The predictor. It is believed that a brownie is able to predict the future to the owners of the house: usually he approaches a sleeping person and leans on his chest so that he can neither breathe nor move, and if at this moment he asks the brownie "for better or for worse?", then he will answer. Scientists explain this condition by sleep paralysis.

Hiding things. Another action closely associated with the brownie is the loss of things. If a person cannot find some thing that is usually lying in a prominent place, then it is considered that a brownie took it. To find a thing, it is customary to say: "brownie-brownie, play and give it away!". Another way is to turn the stool over and tie a handkerchief on its leg. After these manipulations, the thing should be found.

The image of the brownie described in this article refers not only to the patron of the house itself, but also to the patron spirits of other buildings. In the representations of some (mostly living in the north) peoples, the brownie is "divided" into characters-doubles, individual owners of each building or even each functional space of the house (a baking dish, a podpechnik, a golbeshnik - a spirit living behind the stove or under it; an underground worker - a spirit living underground; etc.).

The image described here was deformed under the influence of changes in people's everyday life. So, in private houses, the brownie moves not only around the house, but can also look into the barn, chicken coop, backyard. In the manor houses, the brownie was in charge of all the houses of the farmstead. According to modern ideas, a brownie can live not only in a residential building (each apartment has its own), but also in a garage, shed and even in an office.

Bro anthropomorphic creature changes form choking victim hairy creature helps helps to find the lost thing hurting people predicts the future turns into an animal

Bro

The house of the Slavic peoples is called the mythological spirit - the owner and patron of the house. The image of the brownie in the representations of the Slavs is known primarily from folk tales and epics recorded in the XVIII-XX centuries, but a similar spirit is found in the mythologies of different peoples, regardless of the habitat and common beliefs.

As a rule, it is believed that the spirit of a deceased ancestor becomes the patron of the house. This is typical for many peoples: for the ancient Greeks, where the keepers of the house and hearth were called geniuses, and for the Romans, who called the patron gods of the hearth penates, for the Chinese, Slavs, etc.

Among the Eastern Slavs , the house is most often called:

  • by habitat: rus. domovoy, domovoiko, domovoy grandfather, belor. damavik, domnik, khatnik, ukr. brownie;
  • by location in the house: rus. golbeshnik (golbets — partition behind the oven), zapechnik, belor. podpechnik.
  • according to his status in the house and relations with family members: rus. the owner, the izbyan bolshak, the grandfather-brother, the bro, the dobrohotushko, the shaggy hostess; belor. ladies' khazyain, the lord, the biggest, uncle, brother, grandfather, sioiski; ukr. khazyain, did, bogatir,
  • according to the main functions and manifestations: rus. breadwinner, zhirovik, brush, lizun, ukr. gurkalo.
  • according to his belonging to the evil spirit: Rus. dashing, the other half, fat devil, belor. damn damavy, not your spirit, likhadzei, ukr. domoviy, dyabel, unclean.

The names of the brownie can be taboo: rus. himself, he, often with the help of metathesis: rus. modoveyko, modozhirko, ukr. dombeyko.

The corresponding female characters are named: rus. domovikha, modovikha, domovilikha, domakha, mistress.

In Polesie, especially in the west, names characteristic of evil spirits in general were often used in relation to the brownie (domovik): Satan, crafty, evil spirit, filth, enemy, nyachystik, lyakailo, puzhalo, nachnik, unkind soul, dead man, death, "that, shcho pamer", witch doctor, koydunnik.

Synonyms are: Brownie; Brownie; Grandfather; Posten; Posten; Lizun; Domozhil; Owner; Zhirovik; Undead; Susedko; Bratanushko; Guardian Spirit; Abuser of the house; Baked; Podpechnik; Podpolnik; Golbeshnik.

Among the Western Slavs, the brownie was more often represented as a snake and was called domowy, ubożę, stwor, chobold, kobold, kłobuk, karzełek skrzat, inkluz, plonek, latawiec, domownik, stopan, żmij, chowaniec.

  • Czech: Dědek, had hospodáříček, had domovníček (the snake lives under the threshold of the house and brings good luck)
  • Slovak: Domovik
  • Polish: Domowoj, domowik, dziad, vygorishche
  • at luzhichan: nócnénědky

The Southern Slavs:

  • Serbian: domaћi usluzhni duh, maliћ, maciћ, doma,i, škrat or shpiritus. In Bosnia and Banate could be called a "domestic imp" (Serbo-Croatian. kuћni ђavolak)
  • Bulgarian: stopan
  • Croatian: Domaći
  • Slovenian: Domovoj

There are different variants of the origin of faith in the brownie. There is an assumption that it originates from those times when a "construction sacrifice" was laid in the foundation of a new building. Initially they were people, later animals were sacrificed. According to another theory, the idea of the patron spirit of the house appeared as a result of the pagan cult of ancestors.

On the territory of Russia, with the advent of Christianity, the brownie began to be considered a demon, like other pagan deities. To get rid of it, it was necessary to consecrate the house. On the territory of Ukraine and Belarus, on the contrary, the brownie eventually became considered a good spirit sent by God to protect the house. This is confirmed by the ideas about possible clashes of the brownie with the bannik, the goblin and other "evil" spirits.

It is not difficult to guess that most often the hearth is considered the domovoi's place of residence, but it can also live in the red corner, the basement, in the attic and even under the threshold.

The appearance of the brownie, judging by the descriptions of eyewitnesses, can also be different. He usually appears to be a shaggy creature of small stature. Sometimes it has animal features, but more often it looks like an ordinary short person. He can also take the form of any family member (especially absent), an animal (most often snakes, weasels, cats, roosters, rats).

Usually a brownie is considered a male being, but along with the male image of a brownie, there is also a female one. Usually this is the wife (domovikha) and daughter (domovinka) of a brownie.

The brownie often appears in the stories of eyewitnesses in various manifestations:

Noisy spirit. Poltergeist phenomena are often associated with a brownie. According to some ideas, he can slam doors, creak floorboards, scream, groan, talk and even hit and pinch a person. This may be due to both the bad character of the brownie, and the fact that usually a good brownie is not happy with something (swearing, disorder, bad relations with children or animals, etc.). A less popular version explains such phenomena by the struggle of the brownie with an evil spirit trying to get into the house.

The predictor. It is believed that a brownie is able to predict the future to the owners of the house: usually he approaches a sleeping person and leans on his chest so that he can neither breathe nor move, and if at this moment he asks the brownie "for better or for worse?", then he will answer. Scientists explain this condition by sleep paralysis.

Hiding things. Another action closely associated with the brownie is the loss of things. If a person cannot find some thing that is usually lying in a prominent place, then it is considered that a brownie took it. To find a thing, it is customary to say: "brownie-brownie, play and give it away!". Another way is to turn the stool over and tie a handkerchief on its leg. After these manipulations, the thing should be found.

The image of the brownie described in this article refers not only to the patron of the house itself, but also to the patron spirits of other buildings. In the representations of some (mostly living in the north) peoples, the brownie is "divided" into characters-doubles, individual owners of each building or even each functional space of the house (a baking dish, a podpechnik, a golbeshnik - a spirit living behind the stove or under it; an underground worker - a spirit living underground; etc.).

The image described here was deformed under the influence of changes in people's everyday life. So, in private houses, the brownie moves not only around the house, but can also look into the barn, chicken coop, backyard. In the manor houses, the brownie was in charge of all the houses of the farmstead. According to modern ideas, a brownie can live not only in a residential building (each apartment has its own), but also in a garage, shed and even in an office.

Baked goods anthropomorphic creature changes form choking victim hairy creature helps helps to find the lost thing hurting people predicts the future turns into an animal

Baked goods

The house of the Slavic peoples is called the mythological spirit - the owner and patron of the house. The image of the brownie in the representations of the Slavs is known primarily from folk tales and epics recorded in the XVIII-XX centuries, but a similar spirit is found in the mythologies of different peoples, regardless of the habitat and common beliefs.

As a rule, it is believed that the spirit of a deceased ancestor becomes the patron of the house. This is typical for many peoples: for the ancient Greeks, where the keepers of the house and hearth were called geniuses, and for the Romans, who called the patron gods of the hearth penates, for the Chinese, Slavs, etc.

Among the Eastern Slavs , the house is most often called:

  • by habitat: rus. domovoy, domovoiko, domovoy grandfather, belor. damavik, domnik, khatnik, ukr. brownie;
  • by location in the house: rus. golbeshnik (golbets — partition behind the oven), zapechnik, belor. podpechnik.
  • according to his status in the house and relations with family members: rus. the owner, the izbyan bolshak, the grandfather-brother, the bro, the dobrohotushko, the shaggy hostess; belor. ladies' khazyain, the lord, the biggest, uncle, brother, grandfather, sioiski; ukr. khazyain, did, bogatir,
  • according to the main functions and manifestations: rus. breadwinner, zhirovik, brush, lizun, ukr. gurkalo.
  • according to his belonging to the evil spirit: Rus. dashing, the other half, fat devil, belor. damn damavy, not your spirit, likhadzei, ukr. domoviy, dyabel, unclean.

The names of the brownie can be taboo: rus. himself, he, often with the help of metathesis: rus. modoveyko, modozhirko, ukr. dombeyko.

The corresponding female characters are named: rus. domovikha, modovikha, domovilikha, domakha, mistress.

In Polesie, especially in the west, names characteristic of evil spirits in general were often used in relation to the brownie (domovik): Satan, crafty, evil spirit, filth, enemy, nyachystik, lyakailo, puzhalo, nachnik, unkind soul, dead man, death, "that, shcho pamer", witch doctor, koydunnik.

Synonyms are: Brownie; Brownie; Grandfather; Posten; Posten; Lizun; Domozhil; Owner; Zhirovik; Undead; Susedko; Bratanushko; Guardian Spirit; Abuser of the house; Baked; Podpechnik; Podpolnik; Golbeshnik.

Among the Western Slavs, the brownie was more often represented as a snake and was called domowy, ubożę, stwor, chobold, kobold, kłobuk, karzełek skrzat, inkluz, plonek, latawiec, domownik, stopan, żmij, chowaniec.

  • Czech: Dědek, had hospodáříček, had domovníček (the snake lives under the threshold of the house and brings good luck)
  • Slovak: Domovik
  • Polish: Domowoj, domowik, dziad, vygorishche
  • at luzhichan: nócnénědky

The Southern Slavs:

  • Serbian: domaћi usluzhni duh, maliћ, maciћ, doma,i, škrat or shpiritus. In Bosnia and Banate could be called a "domestic imp" (Serbo-Croatian. kuћni ђavolak)
  • Bulgarian: stopan
  • Croatian: Domaći
  • Slovenian: Domovoj

There are different variants of the origin of faith in the brownie. There is an assumption that it originates from those times when a "construction sacrifice" was laid in the foundation of a new building. Initially they were people, later animals were sacrificed. According to another theory, the idea of the patron spirit of the house appeared as a result of the pagan cult of ancestors.

On the territory of Russia, with the advent of Christianity, the brownie began to be considered a demon, like other pagan deities. To get rid of it, it was necessary to consecrate the house. On the territory of Ukraine and Belarus, on the contrary, the brownie eventually became considered a good spirit sent by God to protect the house. This is confirmed by the ideas about possible clashes of the brownie with the bannik, the goblin and other "evil" spirits.

It is not difficult to guess that most often the hearth is considered the domovoi's place of residence, but it can also live in the red corner, the basement, in the attic and even under the threshold.

The appearance of the brownie, judging by the descriptions of eyewitnesses, can also be different. He usually appears to be a shaggy creature of small stature. Sometimes it has animal features, but more often it looks like an ordinary short person. He can also take the form of any family member (especially absent), an animal (most often snakes, weasels, cats, roosters, rats).

Usually a brownie is considered a male being, but along with the male image of a brownie, there is also a female one. Usually this is the wife (domovikha) and daughter (domovinka) of a brownie.

The brownie often appears in the stories of eyewitnesses in various manifestations:

Noisy spirit. Poltergeist phenomena are often associated with a brownie. According to some ideas, he can slam doors, creak floorboards, scream, groan, talk and even hit and pinch a person. This may be due to both the bad character of the brownie, and the fact that usually a good brownie is not happy with something (swearing, disorder, bad relations with children or animals, etc.). A less popular version explains such phenomena by the struggle of the brownie with an evil spirit trying to get into the house.

The predictor. It is believed that a brownie is able to predict the future to the owners of the house: usually he approaches a sleeping person and leans on his chest so that he can neither breathe nor move, and if at this moment he asks the brownie "for better or for worse?", then he will answer. Scientists explain this condition by sleep paralysis.

Hiding things. Another action closely associated with the brownie is the loss of things. If a person cannot find some thing that is usually lying in a prominent place, then it is considered that a brownie took it. To find a thing, it is customary to say: "brownie-brownie, play and give it away!". Another way is to turn the stool over and tie a handkerchief on its leg. After these manipulations, the thing should be found.

The image of the brownie described in this article refers not only to the patron of the house itself, but also to the patron spirits of other buildings. In the representations of some (mostly living in the north) peoples, the brownie is "divided" into characters-doubles, individual owners of each building or even each functional space of the house (a baking dish, a podpechnik, a golbeshnik - a spirit living behind the stove or under it; an underground worker - a spirit living underground; etc.).

The image described here was deformed under the influence of changes in people's everyday life. So, in private houses, the brownie moves not only around the house, but can also look into the barn, chicken coop, backyard. In the manor houses, the brownie was in charge of all the houses of the farmstead. According to modern ideas, a brownie can live not only in a residential building (each apartment has its own), but also in a garage, shed and even in an office.

Brucolac drinking the blood living dead sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Brucolac

A kind of vampire found in Multan (Moldavia), Transylvania (Semigradje) and Dobrudja, especially often in Wallachia (Southern Romania). 

In appearance, the brucolac seems incredibly swollen, and its skin is stiff and stretched like a drum, and it sounds the same when struck.

Every night he lets out a piercing scream once and whoever responds to this call becomes a victim. To kill a brucolac, you have to chop off his head and immediately burn it in the fire.

Sapkovsky points out that "brucolaks are found not only on Romanian lands, but also in Bulgaria, Greece, and also in Russia, where they are called burdalaks or ghouls."

Burdalak drinking the blood living dead sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Burdalak

A kind of vampire found in Multan (Moldavia), Transylvania (Semigradje) and Dobrudja, especially often in Wallachia (Southern Romania). 

In appearance, the brucolac seems incredibly swollen, and its skin is stiff and stretched like a drum, and it sounds the same when struck.

Every night he lets out a piercing scream once and whoever responds to this call becomes a victim. To kill a brucolac, you have to chop off his head and immediately burn it in the fire.

Sapkovsky points out that "brucolaks are found not only on Romanian lands, but also in Bulgaria, Greece, and also in Russia, where they are called burdalaks or ghouls."

Bubak hurting people makes you wander sounds without visible sources

Bubak

Bubak or Budak is a creature from Czech and Polish legends that looks like a demonic scarecrow. He imitates the crying of a small child to lure travelers, whom he kills, and then weaves a cloth from the souls of his victims. 

Glowing eyes and mouth make it look like Jack with a lantern. And sometimes Bubac is described as a kind of evil version of Santa who travels in a cart pulled by black cats on Christmas Night.

According to the stories, beboks inhabit forests, swamps, dark basements and other similar places.

Bebok hurting people makes you wander sounds without visible sources

Bebok

Bubak or Budak is a creature from Czech and Polish legends that looks like a demonic scarecrow. He imitates the crying of a small child to lure travelers, whom he kills, and then weaves a cloth from the souls of his victims. 

Glowing eyes and mouth make it look like Jack with a lantern. And sometimes Bubac is described as a kind of evil version of Santa who travels in a cart pulled by black cats on Christmas Night.

According to the stories, beboks inhabit forests, swamps, dark basements and other similar places.

Bobo hurting people makes you wander sounds without visible sources

Bobo

Bubak or Budak is a creature from Czech and Polish legends that looks like a demonic scarecrow. He imitates the crying of a small child to lure travelers, whom he kills, and then weaves a cloth from the souls of his victims. 

Glowing eyes and mouth make it look like Jack with a lantern. And sometimes Bubac is described as a kind of evil version of Santa who travels in a cart pulled by black cats on Christmas Night.

According to the stories, beboks inhabit forests, swamps, dark basements and other similar places.

Bobok hurting people makes you wander sounds without visible sources

Bobok

Bubak or Budak is a creature from Czech and Polish legends that looks like a demonic scarecrow. He imitates the crying of a small child to lure travelers, whom he kills, and then weaves a cloth from the souls of his victims. 

Glowing eyes and mouth make it look like Jack with a lantern. And sometimes Bubac is described as a kind of evil version of Santa who travels in a cart pulled by black cats on Christmas Night.

According to the stories, beboks inhabit forests, swamps, dark basements and other similar places.

Budak hurting people makes you wander sounds without visible sources

Budak

Bubak or Budak is a creature from Czech and Polish legends that looks like a demonic scarecrow. He imitates the crying of a small child to lure travelers, whom he kills, and then weaves a cloth from the souls of his victims. 

Glowing eyes and mouth make it look like Jack with a lantern. And sometimes Bubac is described as a kind of evil version of Santa who travels in a cart pulled by black cats on Christmas Night.

According to the stories, beboks inhabit forests, swamps, dark basements and other similar places.

Buggane animal body parts anthropomorphic creature high being hooves turns into a human turns into an animal

Buggane

A creature from the folklore of the Isle of Man. Most often he appeared in the form of a large black calf, but sometimes he appears in human form, although in this case he is still given out by horse ears or hooves. It is capable of growing to monstrous proportions.

Buggane animal body parts anthropomorphic creature high being hooves turns into a human turns into an animal

Buggane

A creature from the folklore of the Isle of Man. Most often he appeared in the form of a large black calf, but sometimes he appears in human form, although in this case he is still given out by horse ears or hooves. It is capable of growing to monstrous proportions.

Buka (Slavic folklore) afraid of sunlight changes form disproportionate body hairy creature sounds without visible sources

Buka (Slavic folklore)

Buka or boogeyman (English Bogeyman) is a folklore character who frightened naughty children.

A creature from Slavic mythology. He usually looks like a furry creature with a huge open mouth and a long tongue. He can turn into a pile of hay, and also make the sounds of a growling dog, while remaining invisible. Sunlight is deadly for him.

In modern ideas, he lives under the bed or closet, where he can pull at night.

Boogeyman afraid of sunlight changes form disproportionate body hairy creature sounds without visible sources

Boogeyman

Buka or boogeyman (English Bogeyman) is a folklore character who frightened naughty children.

A creature from Slavic mythology. He usually looks like a furry creature with a huge open mouth and a long tongue. He can turn into a pile of hay, and also make the sounds of a growling dog, while remaining invisible. Sunlight is deadly for him.

In modern ideas, he lives under the bed or closet, where he can pull at night.

Bukavac animal body parts water creature

Bukavac

A creature from Serbian mythology in the form of a six-legged monster with deer horns. He lives in large reservoirs (lakes, swamps), and at night, coming out of the water, makes a lot of noise, jumps on people or animals and strangles them.

Bukalo animal body parts water creature

Bukalo

A creature from Serbian mythology in the form of a six-legged monster with deer horns. He lives in large reservoirs (lakes, swamps), and at night, coming out of the water, makes a lot of noise, jumps on people or animals and strangles them.

Bukovac animal body parts water creature

Bukovac

A creature from Serbian mythology in the form of a six-legged monster with deer horns. He lives in large reservoirs (lakes, swamps), and at night, coming out of the water, makes a lot of noise, jumps on people or animals and strangles them.

Bunyip fish tail hairy creature scales translucent unusual sounds water creature

Bunyip

An animal from the mythology of the Australian Aborigines. A water creature or spirit. A cryptid that lives in swamps, billabongs, streams, riverbeds and other bodies of water. 

The testimonies of eyewitnesses who allegedly saw him can be divided into two groups: a creature resembling a dog or a seal, and an animal with a long neck and a small head. The first is most often described as a creature 1.2-1.8 meters long, covered with long dark brown or black fur. According to descriptions of this kind, the bunyip has a round head resembling a bulldog, with prominent fangs and well-visible ears.

Most of these descriptions talk about the absence of a tail, fins and long whiskers. The second type of descriptions of bunyips speaks of long-necked creatures ranging in size from 1.5 to 40 meters in length.

He has a long, elongated torso covered with something similar to fur or feathers. Instead of legs, he has fins, which he violently beats when angry. It is translucent.

The creature allegedly has black or brown fur, large ears and small fangs. The head resembles a horse or an ostrich-like emu. The neck is thin (sometimes with a mane), about 1 meter in length, with numerous folds on the skin. There is a tail like a horse's. At night, you can allegedly hear the terrifying screams of these creatures when they eat other animals or people who carelessly approached their shelters.

He was considered the cause of all the bad things that happened to a person.

Baniyip fish tail hairy creature scales translucent unusual sounds water creature

Baniyip

An animal from the mythology of the Australian Aborigines. A water creature or spirit. A cryptid that lives in swamps, billabongs, streams, riverbeds and other bodies of water. 

The testimonies of eyewitnesses who allegedly saw him can be divided into two groups: a creature resembling a dog or a seal, and an animal with a long neck and a small head. The first is most often described as a creature 1.2-1.8 meters long, covered with long dark brown or black fur. According to descriptions of this kind, the bunyip has a round head resembling a bulldog, with prominent fangs and well-visible ears.

Most of these descriptions talk about the absence of a tail, fins and long whiskers. The second type of descriptions of bunyips speaks of long-necked creatures ranging in size from 1.5 to 40 meters in length.

He has a long, elongated torso covered with something similar to fur or feathers. Instead of legs, he has fins, which he violently beats when angry. It is translucent.

The creature allegedly has black or brown fur, large ears and small fangs. The head resembles a horse or an ostrich-like emu. The neck is thin (sometimes with a mane), about 1 meter in length, with numerous folds on the skin. There is a tail like a horse's. At night, you can allegedly hear the terrifying screams of these creatures when they eat other animals or people who carelessly approached their shelters.

He was considered the cause of all the bad things that happened to a person.

Buniyup fish tail hairy creature scales translucent unusual sounds water creature

Buniyup

An animal from the mythology of the Australian Aborigines. A water creature or spirit. A cryptid that lives in swamps, billabongs, streams, riverbeds and other bodies of water. 

The testimonies of eyewitnesses who allegedly saw him can be divided into two groups: a creature resembling a dog or a seal, and an animal with a long neck and a small head. The first is most often described as a creature 1.2-1.8 meters long, covered with long dark brown or black fur. According to descriptions of this kind, the bunyip has a round head resembling a bulldog, with prominent fangs and well-visible ears.

Most of these descriptions talk about the absence of a tail, fins and long whiskers. The second type of descriptions of bunyips speaks of long-necked creatures ranging in size from 1.5 to 40 meters in length.

He has a long, elongated torso covered with something similar to fur or feathers. Instead of legs, he has fins, which he violently beats when angry. It is translucent.

The creature allegedly has black or brown fur, large ears and small fangs. The head resembles a horse or an ostrich-like emu. The neck is thin (sometimes with a mane), about 1 meter in length, with numerous folds on the skin. There is a tail like a horse's. At night, you can allegedly hear the terrifying screams of these creatures when they eat other animals or people who carelessly approached their shelters.

He was considered the cause of all the bad things that happened to a person.

Busier drinking the blood restless spirit

Busier

In Tunguso-Manchurian mythology, the souls of people who died an unnatural death. 

Envious of people, they hunt for the living, lie in wait for them at the graves (where they gnaw the bones of corpses), climb into houses and, waiting for night, attack the sleepers, suck their blood or brain, peck out their eyes. Having taken possession of a person, busieh brings him to complete exhaustion.

Buseu drinking the blood restless spirit

Buseu

In Tunguso-Manchurian mythology, the souls of people who died an unnatural death. 

Envious of people, they hunt for the living, lie in wait for them at the graves (where they gnaw the bones of corpses), climb into houses and, waiting for night, attack the sleepers, suck their blood or brain, peck out their eyes. Having taken possession of a person, busieh brings him to complete exhaustion.

Buvaya the harbinger of death water creature

Buvaya

In Tagalog folklore (Philippines), a giant crocodile-like demon sleeping at the bottom of the ocean, collecting people's souls in its coffin-shaped shoulder chest. He is the guide of the souls of the dead to another world.

Buaya the harbinger of death water creature

Buaya

In Tagalog folklore (Philippines), a giant crocodile-like demon sleeping at the bottom of the ocean, collecting people's souls in its coffin-shaped shoulder chest. He is the guide of the souls of the dead to another world.

Byu animal body parts water creature

Byu

In ancient Chinese mythology, a monstrous turtle fish or a one-horned dragon fish with four legs.

According to various descriptions, she has the body of a fish, and the head, arms and legs are human.

This huge (could easily swallow a boat) fish lived in the sea, but could also live on land. The creature's back and belly are covered with sharp spikes. As soon as the fish appeared on the surface of the sea, a fierce wind began to blow and large waves rose.

Bahar the Cat hairy creature hurting people large creature the manipulation of the thoughts of the victim

Bahar the Cat

Kot Bayun (Bayun cat, cat Bahari) - a character in Russian fairy tales, a huge man-eating cat with a magical voice.

He speaks and lulls with his talk and singing approaching travelers and those of them who do not have enough strength to resist his magic and who are not prepared for a fight with him, the sorcerer cat kills with iron claws. But the one who can catch a cat will find salvation from all diseases and ailments-Bayun's fairy tales are healing.

According to researcher Kirill Korolev, the image of the learned cat-storyteller (Bahar) came from popular Russian legends about the wonders of the fabulous "Indian Kingdom". The features of the cat-monster, which can enchant a person to death with its voice, could also be borrowed from medieval texts like "Physiologist" and ABC books.

The oldest known record of a cat is the text of A. Pushkin's nanny. Further spread of the image was promoted by popular prints that illustrated the prologue to "Ruslan and Lyudmila", and largely thanks to them, the learned cat as the personification of storytelling became a well-known character.

In the fairy tales from the collection of A. N. Afanasiev, most likely, the cat-Bayun replaced the devil.

Breaking boats flying creature wings

Breaking boats

A creature from Afrakan mythology. It is believed that it lives in the Mwinilunga region in the area of the Jindu and Bangwelu swamps in western Zambia, Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

It is described as similar to a pterodactyl. Its skin is red or black in color, with a wingspan of 4 to 7 feet (1.2 - 2.1 m). It has deep-set eyes and a large beak with a mouth full of sharp teeth.

He usually attacks fishermen. He usually kills with a look, but he can also bite off the nose, ears and tear out the throat of his victim. It can also tear up graves and feed on corpses.

Black Silence hooves the bare bones of the skeleton the harbinger of death turns into an animal

Black Silence

Personification of the death of cattle among the Eastern Slavs. 

It appears in the form of a cow or a cat (most often black), or a dog, sometimes in the form of a cow skeleton (a symbol that originated on the model of the popular image of human death) or an old disgusting woman.

Its appearance is accompanied by a mass death of livestock.

It was believed that Cow death appears most often on the day of Agafya Cowshed. 

To frighten Death, the procession raised an incredible noise: they rattled scythes, frying pans, sickles, stove shutters, raised shouts and screams. If an animal (cat, dog) came across, it was immediately killed, believing that it was Death, hiding in the form of a werewolf.

A talisman against Cow death were worn-out old bast shoes soaked in tar, which were hung in the barn

Boto sexual relations with the victim the manipulation of the thoughts of the victim turns into a human

Boto

Pink dolphins are werewolves from Brazilian mythology, living in the waters of the Amazon. At night, they turn into handsome young guys dressed in bright suits of antique cut and large straw hats hiding the blowhole. They go to settlements in search of girls who are able to exert a hypnotic influence and engage in sexual relations.

Burari-bi a small light at the earth's surface restless spirit the glowing areas of the body wings

Burari-bi

This is a creature from Japanese folklore. It appears most often near rivers and looks like a small light in the form of a bird, embraced by fire or glow. The translation of this name literally means "meaningless fire". It is believed that this is an undisturbed spirit whose body was buried without observing rituals.

Belch glowing eyes large creature scales water creature

Belch

An aquatic creature from Polish mythology. He is described as a huge dragon with a long neck, elongated muzzle and glowing eyes.

Bloodsucker anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood hurting people living dead restless spirit unusual eye color

Bloodsucker

The belief in ghouls was most widespread in the territory of Southern Russia (modern Ukraine). A ghoul roughly corresponds to a vampire in Western European mythology and has much in common with a ghoul in the East Slavic tradition, but even in the XIX century these characters were clearly distinguished.

This is a pawned dead man (continues his posthumous existence on the border of two worlds), rising at night from the grave. He harms people and livestock, drinks their blood, damages the economy, it was also believed that he could cause famine, pestilence and drought.

Outwardly, he differs from an ordinary person with an unusually red face and eyes (redness persists even after death from drinking blood).

It was believed that ghouls were people who were werewolves, sorcerers during their lifetime, or those who were excommunicated and anathematized (heretic, apostate, some criminals), unbaptized children, as well as those who died a violent death, committed suicide, were attacked by a ghoul and one whose body was defiled by an animal.

Grave grave According to legend, ghouls get up from their graves at night and walk on the ground, thanks to their humanoid appearance, they easily enter houses and suck the blood of sleeping people, then, before the third roosters crow, they return to their graves.

According to legend, it was possible to kill a ghoul by piercing his corpse with an aspen stake. If this did not help, then the corpse was usually burned. 

Biaban-gul anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature high being large creature unusual sounds

Biaban-gul

In the mythologies of Turks, Azerbaijanis, Kirghiz, Tajiks, an evil spirit living in the steppe or in a cemetery and scaring night travelers.

Gulyabani (Azerbaijani. Qulyabani — "werewolf", from Arabic. hum — "monster-demon", from Persian. yaban — "desert") — werewolf, the lowest evil spirit in the representation of Azerbaijanis (gul-yabans, guli-yabans, biaban-guli), Turks, Kirghiz (gulbiaban), Tajiks (gul, gul-evoni).

According to the beliefs of Azerbaijanis, he has the features of a werewolf, likes to ride a horse at night, tangles her mane, if you catch him and stick a needle in the collar of his clothes, he will work for a person, but will do the opposite. He is hairy and huge (3-4 meters in height), at night he whistles shrilly.

Bone Woman anthropomorphic creature it feeds on life energy restless spirit sexual relations with the victim

Bone Woman

In Japanese mythology, the ghost of a woman in love, sucking the life force out of her lover.

This ghost appears the same as it was in life: a young woman in the prime of her life and beauty. And only those whose eyes are not clouded by love, or true believers can see through the mask of her true image: a rotting, fetid skeleton that has risen from the dead.

At night, hone-onna gets up from the grave and goes to her lover's house. Every night, hone-onna sucks the life force out of the beloved, and he becomes weaker and weaker. If this is not prevented, then in the end he will die and join his mistress in the arms of death.

Barcoyche restless spirit water body

Barcoyche

Caleuche This is a mythical ghost ship from mythology and local folklore on the island of Chiloe, in Chile. This is one of the most important myths about the culture of Chile.

According to Chilean legend, it is a large ghost ship sailing the seas around Chiloe (a small island off the coast of Chile) at night. 

According to one version, the ship is endowed with magical power and has its own consciousness and mind. It became a place of permanent residence of the souls of all those who died at sea.

The ship looks like a beautiful and bright white sailboat with 3 masts of 5 sails each, always full of lights and with the sounds of a party on board, but quickly disappears again, leaving no traces of its presence.

Anyone who accidentally sees a "Kaleuche" floating out of the night fog is doomed to death or lifelong bodily suffering.

However, sometimes the creepy crew of the ship invites a random witness to come on board. If he was not afraid, then the ship plunges into the abyss and all the treasures of the underwater world are revealed to a person. The one who will be able to keep what he saw a secret from his neighbors and will not try to get treasures from the bottom on his own will become a brother for the Kaleuche team and will be able to join the merry company whenever he wants.

The ghost ship is also known for its ability to move underwater, as is another famous ghost ship, the Flying Dutchman.

There are different versions of the legend:

  • The popular version says that this ship collects the dead from the water and gives them a new life on board as crew members who will spend eternity at parties and celebrations.
  • Another version says that a mythical ship will also appear in the seas of Chiloe to enchant fishermen with wonderful music and thus attract them to turn them into slaves-crew members who will be cursed for all eternity, carrying one leg bent on their back.
  • There is also a widespread idea that this is a ship of the dead and slave sailors, there is a version that it will also be a magic ship on which the sorcerers of Chiloe arrange their parties and transport goods after this journey. sorcerers return from a journey they make every 3 months to improve their magical abilities. However, it is said that only sorcerers can approach it and use only the Chilote seahorse as a means of transportation, since by order of Millalobo (an analogue of the sea king in the mythology of Chile), other creatures are forbidden to board it or access the ship in other ways.
  • Another version is that the crew of the ghost ship enters into magical contracts with certain merchants, guaranteeing them prosperity in exchange for services such as using their houses for parties or other illegal or dark purposes. 

Because of this version of the legend, when a person in Chiloe quickly becomes rich, it is often attributed to his signing a contract with the team Kaleuche. 

Similar rumors spread after the 1960 Valdivia earthquake, because some houses were not affected by the fires that subsequently engulfed Chiloe. 

In the same decade, there were stories that the sounds of a ship dropping anchor could be heard around the homes of many successful traders of the Chiloe archipelago. Allegedly, these were the sounds of Kaleuchen, Imperceptibly delivering goods and treasures to those with whom the contract was concluded. However, most people rejected this supernatural explanation and instead placed the responsibility for the merchant's prosperity on mortals rather than supernatural smugglers.

Bunagaya anthropomorphic creature choking victim helps the little creature

Bunagaya

In Okinawan folklore, small creatures living in banyan trees. They have red skin and thick bright red hair. They move by jumping. They can help people around the house, but sometimes they lean on people's chests when they are sleeping, or put out the lights at night.

Blades anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body hairy creature hanging Breasts high being hurting people water creature

Blades

Creatures from Slavic mythology (in particular, the territories of the present Astrakhan, Samara regions, in the regions of the Middle Volga).

The word itself is probably a corruption of "albasta", from the beliefs of the Turkic peoples. This is the most dangerous kind of mermaids, who appear in the form of half-dead decrepit old women. She is usually described as: an unnaturally large woman, with an ugly bloated, abstract figure and huge breasts hanging down to her knees. On her head she has a shock of dirty yellow hair, reaching to the ground, and not rarely and completely hiding the outlines of the creature.

She does not speak human language and only howls softly and wistfully. It lives near rivers, swamps and lakes, which makes it related to such characters as vodyanitsy and boggies. Due to the fact that it is a water character, it moves slowly on land.

She is the leader of mermaids and other aquatic creatures of Slavic folklore. Her task is the death of a person who has fallen into her clutches (more often a pregnant woman or a small child).

Big underwater lynx animal body parts scales water creature

Big underwater lynx

In the myths of the Algonquian tribes of North America, the water deity, the lord of all fish. It depicts a cat-like water creature with a human-like head, whose body is covered with scales. He has a copper tail. It is the keeper of copper deposits.

  • Great Lynx is a variant of the translation of the name Michibichi into English, meaning "Great Lynx"Night Panther is a variant of the translation of the name Michibichi into English, meaning "Night Panther"Underground Panther is a variant of the translation of the name Michibichi into English, meaning "Underground Panther"Underneath Panther is a variant of the translation of the name Michibichi into English, meaning "Panther hiding below"Water Lynx is a variant of the translation of the name Michibichi into English, meaning "Water Lynx"Variants of the spelling of the name Michibichi in Latin: Gichi-anami'e-bizhiw, Gitche-anahmi-bezheu, Maeci-Pesew, Manetuwi-Rusi-Pissi, Manetwi Msn-Pissh, Matc-Piseo, Messibizi, Michi Peshu, Michi-Pichoux, Michibichi, Michipeshu, Michipichi, Michipichik, Michipizhiw, Mishepishu, Mishi Peshu, Mishibijiw, Mishibizhii, Mishibizhii, Mishibizhiw, Mishipashoo, Mishipiishiiw, Mishipizheu, Mishipizhiw, Mishipizhu, Mishupishu, Misibizhiw, Misipisiw, Missibizi, Missipeshieuw, Missipeshu, Missipissy, Mitchipissy, Mshibzhii, Mshibzhiw, Msipessi, Msipissi, Naamipeshiwa, Nah-me-pa-she, Nambi-Za, Nambiza, Nambzhew, Namipeshiwa, Nampe'shiu, Nampeshi'kw, Nampeshiu, Peshipeshiwa, Wi'bskinit M'tc Pis'eu.
Bichen anthropomorphic creature sexual relations with the victim turns into an animal

Bichen

In the mythology of the West Siberian Tatars, a forest spirit that appears in the form of a person or various animals. He lives in abandoned hunting huts, loves horses, rides them, confuses his mane, smears it with resin. In the guise of a beautiful woman enters into a love affair with a man. 

Bu-lao scales the little creature

Bu-lao

In Chinese mythology, one of the nine sons of the dragon is the moon, a lover of bell ringing. This is a fairly small dragon with two heads on different sides of the body.

Bka anthropomorphic creature specifies the location of the treasure the little creature

Bka

In Cornish folklore, little mountain men, skilled miners who know the location of every vein in the thickness of the rocks. Sometimes you can hear them banging their hammers in abandoned tunnels. If any of the people have to like the Stukans, they will tell you where to dig.

Bukka anthropomorphic creature specifies the location of the treasure the little creature

Bukka

In Cornish folklore, little mountain men, skilled miners who know the location of every vein in the thickness of the rocks. Sometimes you can hear them banging their hammers in abandoned tunnels. If any of the people have to like the Stukans, they will tell you where to dig.

Birds flying creature unusual sounds wings

Birds

A legendary creature in the mythology of the North American Indians, possessing supernatural power. It is believed that the giant wings of this bird raise the wind and cause thunder: flapping wings - fire breaks out, flapping - thunder thunders. It is assumed that the feathers of such birds consist of metal.

The name "Thunderbird" comes from the belief that the giant wings of this bird raise the wind and cause thunder. In the Lakota language, the bird is called WakįYą — from the words kįyą ("winged") and wakhą ("sacred"). In the Nootka language, the bird is called Kw-Uhnx-Wa, and in the Ojibwe language it is called animikii or binesi (the latter word refers only to large thunderbirds).

Basket - bearer animal body parts

Basket - bearer

In Zulu folklore, a monster similar to a hyena, but with a head in the form of an elongated and flat basket. Likes to feast on fresh brain.

Bouda turns into an animal

Bouda

A creature from African folklore. People are werewolves who can turn into hyenas. For some reason, hereditary blacksmiths have such a gift. It is characteristic that these werewolves often keep the jewelry they wore when they were human. These creatures are suspected of midnight desecration of graves.

Bouda is the name of a vergien in Ethiopia, Sudan, Tanzania and Morocco

Bultungin is the name of vergien in Nigeria, literally "turning into a hyena"

Hyenodlaci — Czech name Vergien

Qora is the name of Vergien in the kingdom of Kaffa, which later became part of Ethiopia

Werehyenas — English version of the name vergien

Bultungin turns into an animal

Bultungin

A creature from African folklore. People are werewolves who can turn into hyenas. For some reason, hereditary blacksmiths have such a gift. It is characteristic that these werewolves often keep the jewelry they wore when they were human. These creatures are suspected of midnight desecration of graves.

Bouda is the name of a vergien in Ethiopia, Sudan, Tanzania and Morocco

Bultungin is the name of vergien in Nigeria, literally "turning into a hyena"

Hyenodlaci — Czech name Vergien

Qora is the name of Vergien in the kingdom of Kaffa, which later became part of Ethiopia

Werehyenas — English version of the name vergien

Betail drinking the blood it feeds on life energy living dead restless spirit

Betail

In Indian mythology, the undead, an evil vampire-like spirit, traditionally depicted hunting people hanging upside down from the branches of trees growing in cemeteries and lands where the dead are cremated.

Can inhabit the dead and force them to act like living people. After the vetala inhabits the corpse, it ceases to decompose and walks around the world in the manner of a zombie from Voodoo mythology. The difference is that vetala is not interested in devouring brains or human flesh. His goal is simply to annoy and torment people out of envy.

Presumably, vetala arises from the soul of the deceased, for which the necessary rituals were not performed. 

Betailas drinking the blood it feeds on life energy living dead restless spirit

Betailas

In Indian mythology, the undead, an evil vampire-like spirit, traditionally depicted hunting people hanging upside down from the branches of trees growing in cemeteries and lands where the dead are cremated.

Can inhabit the dead and force them to act like living people. After the vetala inhabits the corpse, it ceases to decompose and walks around the world in the manner of a zombie from Voodoo mythology. The difference is that vetala is not interested in devouring brains or human flesh. His goal is simply to annoy and torment people out of envy.

Presumably, vetala arises from the soul of the deceased, for which the necessary rituals were not performed. 

Bigfoot anthropomorphic creature hairy creature high being superpowered creature

Bigfoot

Bigfoot, yeti, sasquatch, bigfoot, engey, avdoshka, almasts - all these are the names of one kind of creatures that supposedly live in forests and mountains in different parts of the planet.

According to eyewitnesses, bigfoot looks like a large ape up to 3 meters tall, covered with dark brown, dark red or gray fur. This creature has large feet (the number of fingers varies from 2 to 6 from case to case). It is assumed that the creature moves well in a wooded area, climbs trees.

Geographically, the phenomenon is spread all over the world. Most often, residents of sparsely populated areas and mountains tell about it, but sometimes there are also reports from national parks and nature reserves.

The exact date of the phenomenon is unknown. Reports of creatures with a similar description have appeared over the past few centuries. However, in the old legends, one can also find a description of "a tall, overgrown man with hair, who is stronger and denser than an ordinary peasant, perhaps has the ability to influence people's consciousness, instilling powerful fear or forcing them not to notice their presence, and lives in the forest." So some eyewitnesses told about the meeting with the goblin.

Versions

As in the case of other similar phenomena, there are those who believe in bigfoot, and those who doubt his reality. Most modern scientists are skeptical about the possibility of the existence of a snowman, because, despite a lot of evidence, there are still no sufficient grounds to confirm the existence of someone new and unexplored.

Many versions have been collected explaining many stories of encounters with the Yeti.

Deliberate hoaxes. During periods of increased interest in the topic, there are a lot of deliberate falsifications associated with the phenomenon of bigfoot. These are not only the stories of "eyewitnesses", but also traces, photographs, wool, feces, etc. There can be many reasons for such actions, from confirming one's own theory to attracting attention.

Observer errors. Real animals (for example, a bear, because not only its appearance is similar, but also its fur and other traces of its presence are most often detected during research by scientists), and in some cases inanimate objects (the movement of plants in the wind, the play of light and shadows) could be taken for the yeti in conditions of poor visibility.

Folklore. Stories about bigfoot can be completely folklore fiction, modified and embellished with a real story or a story based on folklore.

Among those who believe in the existence of bigfoot, the most popular versions are that he is a mammal belonging to the order of primates and the genus of man, preserved to this day from prehistoric times, a creature of alien origin and even a time traveler or a guest from another dimension.

There is an opposite theory, according to which the yeti are feral people with mental disabilities.

C

Con Annon hairy creature sounds without visible sources the harbinger of death translucent

Con Annon

In the mythology of the British Celts, these are ghostly white dogs with red ears. They were harbingers of death. It was to them that the barking was attributed, coming from nowhere.

Cadborosaurus fastest thing water creature

Cadborosaurus

A hypothetical marine reptile supposedly living off the coast of North America. It is also called Cadborosaurus willsi or "Caddy".

Eyewitnesses most often describe the cadborosaurus as a huge snake with an elongated narrow body, 5 to 30 meters long, with a head similar to a horse or camel, on a long neck. He allegedly has two small front fins, a caudal fin, as well as two large rear fins. The animal allegedly moves through the bends of its own body and can reach speeds of up to 40 km/h.

The first reports of cadborosaurus began to arrive about 200 years ago, at the turn of the XVIII and XIX centuries, and since then about 300 of his observations have been recorded, some of them reportedly taking place not only on the coast of British Columbia, but also near Vancouver Island and in the San Francisco Bay area in California.

Photos of half-decomposed carcasses of initially unidentified marine animals or these carcasses themselves in the first half of the XX century were often tried to associate with these creatures. In all the cases covered in the press, scientists eventually proved that the remains belong to a shark, a baleen whale, a sea lion or some other known creature.

Caddy fastest thing water creature

Caddy

A hypothetical marine reptile supposedly living off the coast of North America. It is also called Cadborosaurus willsi or "Caddy".

Eyewitnesses most often describe the cadborosaurus as a huge snake with an elongated narrow body, 5 to 30 meters long, with a head similar to a horse or camel, on a long neck. He allegedly has two small front fins, a caudal fin, as well as two large rear fins. The animal allegedly moves through the bends of its own body and can reach speeds of up to 40 km/h.

The first reports of cadborosaurus began to arrive about 200 years ago, at the turn of the XVIII and XIX centuries, and since then about 300 of his observations have been recorded, some of them reportedly taking place not only on the coast of British Columbia, but also near Vancouver Island and in the San Francisco Bay area in California.

Photos of half-decomposed carcasses of initially unidentified marine animals or these carcasses themselves in the first half of the XX century were often tried to associate with these creatures. In all the cases covered in the press, scientists eventually proved that the remains belong to a shark, a baleen whale, a sea lion or some other known creature.

Cajc changes form sounds without visible sources the distortion of time

Cajc

Kaj, kajk, or kaji (arm. Քաջք, cargo. ქაიი) — the spirit of wind, storms and war in Armenian and Georgian mythologies.

Spirits of winds and wars, who are able to change their appearance and become invisible. Their music and dancing enchant people and a person can lose the passage of time. They really like to mess up.

Callah Vare anthropomorphic creature turns into a human

Callah Vare

A creature from the mythology of Scotland. This is a skinny witch with a blue face, who personified winter. She is the patroness of wild animals and fishing. Capable of turning into a stone or a girl.

Camaueto unusual sounds water creature

Camaueto

A creature from the folklore of the inhabitants of Patagonia and the Chilean archipelago.

It is an incredibly strong beast, resembling a horse or bull, but with strong claws and fangs. A new individual grows out of the horn of an adult kamaueto planted in the ground. He is born necessarily in fresh water, and as an adult he lives in the sea. When he moves into it by the river (on a hurricane night), heart-rending sounds are heard. It sinks ships and eats up the entire crew.

Camajueto unusual sounds water creature

Camajueto

A creature from the folklore of the inhabitants of Patagonia and the Chilean archipelago.

It is an incredibly strong beast, resembling a horse or bull, but with strong claws and fangs. A new individual grows out of the horn of an adult kamaueto planted in the ground. He is born necessarily in fresh water, and as an adult he lives in the sea. When he moves into it by the river (on a hurricane night), heart-rending sounds are heard. It sinks ships and eats up the entire crew.

Camelopard animal body parts superpowered creature

Camelopard

In medieval mythology, it is a creature that lives in Africa, with a camel's head with two horns bent back and a leopard's torso. It has great strength and ferocity.

Cameleopard animal body parts superpowered creature

Cameleopard

In medieval mythology, it is a creature that lives in Africa, with a camel's head with two horns bent back and a leopard's torso. It has great strength and ferocity.

Camelopard animal body parts superpowered creature

Camelopard

In medieval mythology, it is a creature that lives in Africa, with a camel's head with two horns bent back and a leopard's torso. It has great strength and ferocity.

Camelopardus animal body parts superpowered creature

Camelopardus

In medieval mythology, it is a creature that lives in Africa, with a camel's head with two horns bent back and a leopard's torso. It has great strength and ferocity.

Camelopardalis animal body parts superpowered creature

Camelopardalis

In medieval mythology, it is a creature that lives in Africa, with a camel's head with two horns bent back and a leopard's torso. It has great strength and ferocity.

Capre anthropomorphic creature hairy creature high being makes you wander sounds without visible sources

Capre

A tree demon from the folklore of the Philippine Islands, a bearded humanoid creature 2-3 meters tall. Invisible to man, but can make him wander. His presence betrays laughter out of nowhere, an abundance of dragonflies or smoke.

Cat Bayun hairy creature hurting people large creature the manipulation of the thoughts of the victim

Cat Bayun

Kot Bayun (Bayun cat, cat Bahari) - a character in Russian fairy tales, a huge man-eating cat with a magical voice.

He speaks and lulls with his talk and singing approaching travelers and those of them who do not have enough strength to resist his magic and who are not prepared for a fight with him, the sorcerer cat kills with iron claws. But the one who can catch a cat will find salvation from all diseases and ailments-Bayun's fairy tales are healing.

According to researcher Kirill Korolev, the image of the learned cat-storyteller (Bahar) came from popular Russian legends about the wonders of the fabulous "Indian Kingdom". The features of the cat-monster, which can enchant a person to death with its voice, could also be borrowed from medieval texts like "Physiologist" and ABC books.

The oldest known record of a cat is the text of A. Pushkin's nanny. Further spread of the image was promoted by popular prints that illustrated the prologue to "Ruslan and Lyudmila", and largely thanks to them, the learned cat as the personification of storytelling became a well-known character.

In the fairy tales from the collection of A. N. Afanasiev, most likely, the cat-Bayun replaced the devil.

Catoblepas the harbinger of death

Catoblepas

A creature from folklore Ethiopia. It is a small wild animal with sedentary limbs and a huge head that is constantly lowered to the ground. Everyone who looks into his eyes immediately dies.

Centaur animal body parts

Centaur

In Greek mythology, a creature with a horse's body and a human torso.

Centaurus animal body parts

Centaurus

In Greek mythology, a creature with a horse's body and a human torso.

Chargavy restless spirit the harbinger of death

Chargavy

In Belarusian folklore, the last of those buried in the cemetery, acting as a defender of the village before Death. It can be considered a harbinger of death, although it tries its best to delay it.

Charybdis water creature

Charybdis

In Greek myths, a monster that lived in a whirlpool (near the cave of Scylla) and swallowed up everyone passing by.

Charybdis water creature

Charybdis

In Greek myths, a monster that lived in a whirlpool (near the cave of Scylla) and swallowed up everyone passing by.

Chud anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body high being

Chud

In Russian folklore, the people of white-eyed giants with faces on their chests, who lived in the north.

According to another version, they live underground and are close to European dwarfs in meaning: people of short stature, while fabulously rich.

According to the third version, the chud has turned into evil spirits who hide in dark places, abandoned dwellings, baths, even under water. They are invisible, leave behind traces of bird paws or children's feet, harm people and can replace their children with their own. This makes them related to the fairies of Irish folklore.

These are ancient mythical people, characters of Russian, Finno-Ugric[3] (including Komi) folklore. It is also found in Sami folklore.

Chud white - eyed anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body high being

Chud white - eyed

In Russian folklore, the people of white-eyed giants with faces on their chests, who lived in the north.

According to another version, they live underground and are close to European dwarfs in meaning: people of short stature, while fabulously rich.

According to the third version, the chud has turned into evil spirits who hide in dark places, abandoned dwellings, baths, even under water. They are invisible, leave behind traces of bird paws or children's feet, harm people and can replace their children with their own. This makes them related to the fairies of Irish folklore.

These are ancient mythical people, characters of Russian, Finno-Ugric[3] (including Komi) folklore. It is also found in Sami folklore.

Church Makeup anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature restless spirit turns into an animal

Church Makeup

A creature from English and Scandinavian folklore. He was considered the spirit of the church. He could appear in the form of a black dog or a small dark-skinned man.

Churelin anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body drinking the blood restless spirit sexual relations with the victim turns into a human

Churelin

In Indian folklore, it is the spirit of a woman who died during pregnancy or shortly after giving birth. He becomes a vampire who lies in wait for lonely travelers.

Usually such spirits look like bogeymen with a huge head and hair sticking out in all directions, but they are able to take the form of beauties in order to attract men.

Churel anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body drinking the blood restless spirit sexual relations with the victim turns into a human

Churel

In Indian folklore, it is the spirit of a woman who died during pregnancy or shortly after giving birth. He becomes a vampire who lies in wait for lonely travelers.

Usually such spirits look like bogeymen with a huge head and hair sticking out in all directions, but they are able to take the form of beauties in order to attract men.

Churin anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body drinking the blood restless spirit sexual relations with the victim turns into a human

Churin

In Indian folklore, it is the spirit of a woman who died during pregnancy or shortly after giving birth. He becomes a vampire who lies in wait for lonely travelers.

Usually such spirits look like bogeymen with a huge head and hair sticking out in all directions, but they are able to take the form of beauties in order to attract men.

Cluricon flying objects sounds without visible sources

Cluricon

A Scottish house spirit that steals things from people and makes noise, screams and other sounds, although it rarely shows itself to a person.

Cmoc scales

Cmoc

In Belarusian and Polish mythology, the spirit is in the form of a snake. Three kinds of Cmocs: General (Cmoc), Brownie (domovik) and Forest (lesovik). Cmoc is not hostile to man.

Cockatrice animal body parts

Cockatrice

A creature from European mythology with the head of a rooster, the body and eyes of a toad and two snake tails (one of which is equipped with a sting). Can kill with a look.

Cockatrix animal body parts

Cockatrix

A creature from European mythology with the head of a rooster, the body and eyes of a toad and two snake tails (one of which is equipped with a sting). Can kill with a look.

Congomato flying creature wings

Congomato

A creature from Afrakan mythology. It is believed that it lives in the Mwinilunga region in the area of the Jindu and Bangwelu swamps in western Zambia, Angola and the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

It is described as similar to a pterodactyl. Its skin is red or black in color, with a wingspan of 4 to 7 feet (1.2 - 2.1 m). It has deep-set eyes and a large beak with a mouth full of sharp teeth.

He usually attacks fishermen. He usually kills with a look, but he can also bite off the nose, ears and tear out the throat of his victim. It can also tear up graves and feed on corpses.

Cow Death hooves the bare bones of the skeleton the harbinger of death turns into an animal

Cow Death

Personification of the death of cattle among the Eastern Slavs. 

It appears in the form of a cow or a cat (most often black), or a dog, sometimes in the form of a cow skeleton (a symbol that originated on the model of the popular image of human death) or an old disgusting woman.

Its appearance is accompanied by a mass death of livestock.

It was believed that Cow death appears most often on the day of Agafya Cowshed. 

To frighten Death, the procession raised an incredible noise: they rattled scythes, frying pans, sickles, stove shutters, raised shouts and screams. If an animal (cat, dog) came across, it was immediately killed, believing that it was Death, hiding in the form of a werewolf.

A talisman against Cow death were worn-out old bast shoes soaked in tar, which were hung in the barn

Cook anthropomorphic creature hairy creature hurting people restless spirit the manipulation of the actions of the victim the unusual shape of the eyes

Cook

El Cuco (or Cucuy, Coca, Cook, Coco) is a mystical ghost monster that is mentioned in scary stories for children in many Latin American and Portuguese–speaking countries. In its cultural significance, it is similar to the American Boogeyman and Babai from Slavic folklore.

El Cuco has a gender, although it is impossible to distinguish him by the appearance of the monster. At the same time, the folklore names of creatures of different sexes are different: Kuko is a male monster, and Kuka is a female, .

The myth of El Cuco originated in the countries of Portugal and Spain. The Spanish word "coco" ("coco") comes from the Portuguese "coco" ("cotco") – the so-called ghost with a pumpkin instead of a head. The word "coco" is used colloquially to refer to a human head in Portuguese and Spanish. Also "coco" means "skull". The word "cocuruto" in Portuguese means "crown" (and also "top" if we are talking about a hill or mountain). From the Basque language, "gogo" translates as "spirit". In Spanish mythology, "Crouga" is the name of a little–known deity to whom gifts were presented.

In many Latin American countries, the monster is often called El Cucuy. In northern New Mexico and southern Colorado, where the Hispanic population predominates, the creature is called "Coco Man".

El Cuco kidnaps and devours children. He can swallow a child right away without leaving a trace, or maybe, being a ghost, he can inhabit him and take him away to no one knows where. The monster comes to the naughty children, climbs on the roof and watches them.

This creature is often compared to the devil, contrasting with the guardian angel. There is a version that initially El Cuco was the spirit of a deceased person.

There is no generally accepted description of El Cuco, because he is portrayed differently in different countries. All descriptions of the creature agree that it is very scary to look at. He is described as a shapeless figure or a hairy monster that hides in closets or under beds. In the Middle Ages, at festivals, the creature was depicted as a female dragon. In Brazilian folklore, the monster is depicted as a humanoid female alligator and is called a Cook.

In Portugal, El Cuco's head is traditionally depicted as a carved vegetable lantern made of pumpkin, with two eyes and a mouth and a candle inside. He is also represented as a warrior carrying his own severed head.

Interestingly, in 1498, the sailor Vasco da Gama named the fruit of the Polynesian palm "coco", recalling the mythical creature. The word "coconut" comes from here.

The image of this monster has been used many times in the culture of different countries, ranging from Francisco Goya's 1799 work entitled "The Arrival of El Cucuy", to Stephen King's modern novel "The Outsider" ("The Outsider", 2018).

Coca anthropomorphic creature hairy creature hurting people restless spirit the manipulation of the actions of the victim the unusual shape of the eyes

Coca

El Cuco (or Cucuy, Coca, Cook, Coco) is a mystical ghost monster that is mentioned in scary stories for children in many Latin American and Portuguese–speaking countries. In its cultural significance, it is similar to the American Boogeyman and Babai from Slavic folklore.

El Cuco has a gender, although it is impossible to distinguish him by the appearance of the monster. At the same time, the folklore names of creatures of different sexes are different: Kuko is a male monster, and Kuka is a female, .

The myth of El Cuco originated in the countries of Portugal and Spain. The Spanish word "coco" ("coco") comes from the Portuguese "coco" ("cotco") – the so-called ghost with a pumpkin instead of a head. The word "coco" is used colloquially to refer to a human head in Portuguese and Spanish. Also "coco" means "skull". The word "cocuruto" in Portuguese means "crown" (and also "top" if we are talking about a hill or mountain). From the Basque language, "gogo" translates as "spirit". In Spanish mythology, "Crouga" is the name of a little–known deity to whom gifts were presented.

In many Latin American countries, the monster is often called El Cucuy. In northern New Mexico and southern Colorado, where the Hispanic population predominates, the creature is called "Coco Man".

El Cuco kidnaps and devours children. He can swallow a child right away without leaving a trace, or maybe, being a ghost, he can inhabit him and take him away to no one knows where. The monster comes to the naughty children, climbs on the roof and watches them.

This creature is often compared to the devil, contrasting with the guardian angel. There is a version that initially El Cuco was the spirit of a deceased person.

There is no generally accepted description of El Cuco, because he is portrayed differently in different countries. All descriptions of the creature agree that it is very scary to look at. He is described as a shapeless figure or a hairy monster that hides in closets or under beds. In the Middle Ages, at festivals, the creature was depicted as a female dragon. In Brazilian folklore, the monster is depicted as a humanoid female alligator and is called a Cook.

In Portugal, El Cuco's head is traditionally depicted as a carved vegetable lantern made of pumpkin, with two eyes and a mouth and a candle inside. He is also represented as a warrior carrying his own severed head.

Interestingly, in 1498, the sailor Vasco da Gama named the fruit of the Polynesian palm "coco", recalling the mythical creature. The word "coconut" comes from here.

The image of this monster has been used many times in the culture of different countries, ranging from Francisco Goya's 1799 work entitled "The Arrival of El Cucuy", to Stephen King's modern novel "The Outsider" ("The Outsider", 2018).

Coco anthropomorphic creature hairy creature hurting people restless spirit the manipulation of the actions of the victim the unusual shape of the eyes

Coco

El Cuco (or Cucuy, Coca, Cook, Coco) is a mystical ghost monster that is mentioned in scary stories for children in many Latin American and Portuguese–speaking countries. In its cultural significance, it is similar to the American Boogeyman and Babai from Slavic folklore.

El Cuco has a gender, although it is impossible to distinguish him by the appearance of the monster. At the same time, the folklore names of creatures of different sexes are different: Kuko is a male monster, and Kuka is a female, .

The myth of El Cuco originated in the countries of Portugal and Spain. The Spanish word "coco" ("coco") comes from the Portuguese "coco" ("cotco") – the so-called ghost with a pumpkin instead of a head. The word "coco" is used colloquially to refer to a human head in Portuguese and Spanish. Also "coco" means "skull". The word "cocuruto" in Portuguese means "crown" (and also "top" if we are talking about a hill or mountain). From the Basque language, "gogo" translates as "spirit". In Spanish mythology, "Crouga" is the name of a little–known deity to whom gifts were presented.

In many Latin American countries, the monster is often called El Cucuy. In northern New Mexico and southern Colorado, where the Hispanic population predominates, the creature is called "Coco Man".

El Cuco kidnaps and devours children. He can swallow a child right away without leaving a trace, or maybe, being a ghost, he can inhabit him and take him away to no one knows where. The monster comes to the naughty children, climbs on the roof and watches them.

This creature is often compared to the devil, contrasting with the guardian angel. There is a version that initially El Cuco was the spirit of a deceased person.

There is no generally accepted description of El Cuco, because he is portrayed differently in different countries. All descriptions of the creature agree that it is very scary to look at. He is described as a shapeless figure or a hairy monster that hides in closets or under beds. In the Middle Ages, at festivals, the creature was depicted as a female dragon. In Brazilian folklore, the monster is depicted as a humanoid female alligator and is called a Cook.

In Portugal, El Cuco's head is traditionally depicted as a carved vegetable lantern made of pumpkin, with two eyes and a mouth and a candle inside. He is also represented as a warrior carrying his own severed head.

Interestingly, in 1498, the sailor Vasco da Gama named the fruit of the Polynesian palm "coco", recalling the mythical creature. The word "coconut" comes from here.

The image of this monster has been used many times in the culture of different countries, ranging from Francisco Goya's 1799 work entitled "The Arrival of El Cucuy", to Stephen King's modern novel "The Outsider" ("The Outsider", 2018).

Chirada animal body parts

Chirada

Garuda (Skt. गरर, IAST: GaruḍA, tib. Khyung, Mkha` lding) is a mythical king of birds in the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, half—man and half-bird.

In Hinduism, the riding bird (with a female body and head) of the god Vishnu, a fighter with naga snakes.

Cool animal body parts

Cool

Garuda (Skt. गरर, IAST: GaruḍA, tib. Khyung, Mkha` lding) is a mythical king of birds in the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, half—man and half-bird.

In Hinduism, the riding bird (with a female body and head) of the god Vishnu, a fighter with naga snakes.

Carla anthropomorphic creature hurting people pass the device or knowledge the little creature

Carla

According to the mythological dictionary, dwarves in the lower mythology of the peoples of Europe are called small anthropomorphic creatures that live most often in the mountains (less often-underground or in the forest, and sometimes it is believed that their homes are hidden in a parallel world connected with ours). The origin of this word is disputed: it is taken from the Latin language from "gēnomos" – "underground dweller", or from the ancient Greek "ΓνώΣη" - knowledge.

Gnomes were popularized (according to another version – invented) by the alchemist Paracelsus in the XVI century, although they were found much earlier in the folklore of European peoples. Paracelsus describes the dwarves as being two spans tall (about 40 cm), extremely reluctant to make contact with people and able to move through the earth's firmament with the same ease as people move in space.

Ideas about such creatures exist in many cultures, but not in all languages they have the name "gnome". For example, the Germans call them "zwerg" ("zwerg"), the British - "dwarf" ("dwarf" in the sense of "dwarf"). From the Old Norse "dvergr" came the old High German "twerg". According to Vladimir Orel, both of these names are derived from the Proto-Germanic "đwerȝaz". In French, dwarves are called "nain", in Italy - "nano", both words from the Greek "vᾶνος" — "tiny". Other European languages have their own words that are not related to any of these roots – Polish "krasnolud", Finnish" kääpiö", Czech" trpaslík " and others. Philological studies also indicate that in the Russian literature of the early XIX century, along with the" gnome", the variant"Karl" was often found.

According to ancient legends, dwarves were originally lower magical creatures, but they were not physically small in stature. The idea of dwarves as creatures of small stature appeared after the spread of Christianity.

The first literary sources where dwarves are mentioned were the Icelandic heroic songs of the 13th century from the collection "The Elder Edda", as well as the text of the “Younger Edda”, compiled by the skald poet Snorri Sturluson, who lived at the turn of the 12th and 13th centuries. Both literary works contain mythological tales of the 8th-10th centuries, as well as elements of the German heroic epic of the early 13th century.

Dwarves are usually considered spirits of the earth and mountains, guarding underground treasures. In alchemy and occultism, they are considered the spirits of the earth as the primary element, and, accordingly, the elementals of the earth. Because of these beliefs, dwarves are often given various supernatural powers, including supernatural skill and wealth.

They describe dwarves in different ways. Their height varies from the size of a finger to the height of a small child. Male dwarves usually wear long beards, and are sometimes endowed with goat legs or crow's feet. Men, dwarves are not very beauty, unlike the dwarf women (called "gnomey").

Description of gnomes in the Book of Fictional Creatures by Jorge Luis Borges:

"Popular imagination imagines them as bearded dwarfs with coarse and comical features; they are dressed in narrow brown caftans and monastic hoods."

According to ancient legends, dwarves, like fairies, love to tease people, but at the same time do them more good than evil. They can present some magical artifact, indicate the place where the treasure is hidden, or fulfill some small request or errand.

In modern culture, dwarves are remembered and loved. They are found in large numbers in fantasy stories of literature, movies, and computer games, and on the lawns of Europeans and Americans you can find figures of garden gnomes installed there as guardians of the earth. At the same time, pop culture has gone far from the original ideas about dwarves and is based rather on the images described in famous science fiction works (which, for example, often contain jokes about female dwarves, giving them a beard, mustache, or simply indistinguishable from the male body structure). These gnomes do not differ much in their behavior from fairies, brownies and other mystical creatures. They are rarely distinguished by any characteristic features other than their height or a caricatured "dwarf" appearance, reminiscent of the aforementioned garden figurine.

Due to the fact that dwarves are seen primarily as the characters of fairy tales along with the fairies (which, however, does not prevent adults, and periodically to meet and even photographed last), witnesses of the dwarves quite a bit, and Yes, those are rarely taken seriously (unlike the witnesses, for example, ghosts or aliens).

Centikor animal body parts

Centikor

A creature from medieval bestiaries the size of a hippopotamus, an elephant's tail, boar's jaws and movable horns, with which he attacks alternately in battle. The color is black or red.

Cerberus animal body parts large creature

Cerberus

Cerberus (Kerber) a three-headed dog of enormous size from Greek mythology. In some descriptions it has body parts of other animals: crocodile head, hippopotamus croup, snake heads, etc.

Chiang-shi fastest thing flying creature hurting people sounds without visible sources the transition to another world turns into a human

Chiang-shi

In Chinese mythology, a deceased person who died an unnatural death or was left without burial, who became a vampire.

"Jiangshi" is read as ken-si in Cantonese, kyong thi in Vietnamese, Kangxi in Korean, Kensi in Japanese, and Hantu pochon in Malay.

It is usually depicted as an ossified body (depending on the age of death - different stages of decomposition), dressed in official robes of the Qing dynasty, which moves with jumps, arms outstretched.

Jiangshi kills living beings, usually at night to absorb their qi, or life force, while during the day he rests in a coffin or hides in dark places. It glows with a green phosphorescent fire, it has sawtooth teeth and long claws.

Capcuen animal body parts anthropomorphic creature hairy creature hurting people

Capcuen

A man with a dog's head, a half-man, half-dog in Romanian mythology. He has two heads or two muzzles (mouths) and a dog, which is on the back of the head. According to some reports, they have four eyes on the back of their heads.

These are cannibals, swallowing whole children or large pieces of human meat with bones and everything else in one of their mouths, and spitting out inedible waste from the other.

It was said that they caught boys and fattened them for slaughter. Probably, the belief about these creatures probably comes from the Greek novel "Alexandria", which was translated into Romanian in 1620, which tells how Alexander the Great reached a country where there lived "people who had a human face in front and spoke like a human, and a dog's muzzle that barked like a dog behind." 

Creeping water flying creature wings

Creeping water

A Japanese variety of water, a character having the features of a human, a turtle, a frog. On the top of the mouthguard there is a recess in the shape of an oval saucer, which must always be filled with water, otherwise it will die. Pulls people into the water and then pulls out their insides through the anus. It is believed that if you catch a mouthguard, he will fulfill any wish.

Cynocephalus animal body parts anthropomorphic creature hooves

Cynocephalus

Kinocephalus or Pseglavets is a creature known since the mythology of Ancient Greece, but legends about a creature with such a description can be found all over the world. It looks like a man with a dog's (sometimes wolf, jackal or hyena are mentioned) head. Sometimes they mention legs like a bull.

According to ancient writers, kinocephals lived in India, Libya, Ethiopia, Scythia — on the borders of the then ecumene. Aristotle in Animal stories mentions kinocephalians among monkeys, which researchers interpret as a description of baboons.

Hesiod mentions the "arrogant dogheads" among the offspring Gay-Earth, on a par with massagets and pygmies

Chinese Fox a small light at the earth's surface helps hurting people turns into a human

Chinese Fox

In the mythology of China, Japan, Vietnam Korea is a fox that can transform into a human. The ability to take the form of a person appears after reaching a certain age (usually a hundred years, although in some legends — fifty). Usually they take the form of a seductive young girl, but sometimes they turn into men.

In Japanese folklore, these animals have great knowledge, a long life and magical abilities. In folklore, a kitsune is a kind of yokai, that is, a demon. In this context, the word "kitsune" is often translated as "fox spirit". 

A kitsune can have up to nine tails. In general, it is believed that the older and stronger the fox, the more tails he has. Some sources even claim that kitsune grows an extra tail every hundred or thousand years of his life.

She can play tricks on people, attack them because of some transgressions (for example, killing a fox), or she can settle in the house and help with the housework. Other possibilities include the ability to inhabit other people's bodies, appear in other people's dreams, create illusions so complex that they are almost indistinguishable from reality, bend space and time, drive people crazy, or take such inhuman or fantastic forms as trees of indescribable height or the second moon in the sky.

Kitsune feed on the life or spiritual power of the people they come into contact with.

She is able to ignite a blue glow with her breath or tail. There is also a belief that she does not just create a light that can move, but holds a lighted horse bone in her mouth.

Cleure a small light at the earth's surface changes form large creature

Cleure

In Flemish (Belgian) folklore, evil forest spirits are werewolves, usually taking the form of a raven, a black dog or a wolf (sometimes with wings), a demonic horse, a cat, a huge toad, and even a tree. You can tell about his approach by two small blue lights that swing and dance. They are considered the eyes of a ghost.

Chukly-mukly anthropomorphic creature

Chukly-mukly

A creature from the mythology of the Komi peoples. He lives in a fishing hut, probably being an analogue of a brownie. The name of the spirit roughly translates as "a creature with big crooked legs", has parallels in folklore: chukly-mukly "crooked-oblique", chukyl-mukyl "tj", as well as ji maklya (a character in children's songs).

Perhaps it is a loan. The average Vologda khokhla, Khokhla-mohr, Khokhla-mahrya is an evil spirit that frightened children. Russian mohar - mohor, a bunch of wool, feathers, a tuft, a braid; crest - a tuft of hair, wool, feathers on the head; crest - devil, devil, unclean.

Chukyl-mukyl anthropomorphic creature

Chukyl-mukyl

A creature from the mythology of the Komi peoples. He lives in a fishing hut, probably being an analogue of a brownie. The name of the spirit roughly translates as "a creature with big crooked legs", has parallels in folklore: chukly-mukly "crooked-oblique", chukyl-mukyl "tj", as well as ji maklya (a character in children's songs).

Perhaps it is a loan. The average Vologda khokhla, Khokhla-mohr, Khokhla-mahrya is an evil spirit that frightened children. Russian mohar - mohor, a bunch of wool, feathers, a tuft, a braid; crest - a tuft of hair, wool, feathers on the head; crest - devil, devil, unclean.

Colo Colo animal body parts sounds without visible sources unusual eye color

Colo Colo

In Chilean folklore, it is a small creature that looks like a rat. It mixes the features of a rooster, a snake and a rat. His muzzle looks like a pig. There are several rows of teeth in the mouth. The eyes are bright red and pop out of their sockets.

When it is unnoticed, it can be given out by a squeak similar to a baby crying. At night, he sneaks into houses, sucks saliva and moisture from the eyes of the sleepers, which soon leads to death from desiccation and suffocating cough.

Crying woman anthropomorphic creature restless spirit unusual sounds

Crying woman

A creature from Mexican folklore. Presumably it appeared as a retelling of the ancient Greek myth of Medea (according to legend, she drowned her own children in order to take revenge on her husband, after which she committed suicide). This restless spirit wanders the earth, exclaiming "Ay, mis hijos!" ("Oh, my children!").

Mexican mothers scare their children with this ghost:

"If you walk after sunset by the river, La Llorona will take you and drown you!".

Corocotta animal body parts

Corocotta

A creature from medieval literature. He is described as a cross between a hyena and a lioness with a huge mouth, capable of imitating human speech.

Carmeno anthropomorphic creature helps the little creature

Carmeno

In Spanish folklore, horned dwarfs in red hats and red trousers. They help with homework. In different parts of Spain, these creatures are known by different names: diablillo in Galicia, maridillo and maneiro in Catalonia (Catalan maneiro, however, look like big black beetles), pauto in Asturias, menge in Cantabria, carmeno in Andalusia.

Chemosit anthropomorphic creature hairy creature

Chemosit

A creature from folklore Kenya and Uganda. Eyewitnesses describe it as a large predatory animal, larger than a brown bear, covered with red-brown or black fur, leading a nocturnal lifestyle, moving with a shuffling gait comparable to a bear, and killing people and animals. Sometimes he walks on his hind legs, which makes him more anthropomorphic.

Chimiset anthropomorphic creature hairy creature

Chimiset

A creature from folklore Kenya and Uganda. Eyewitnesses describe it as a large predatory animal, larger than a brown bear, covered with red-brown or black fur, leading a nocturnal lifestyle, moving with a shuffling gait comparable to a bear, and killing people and animals. Sometimes he walks on his hind legs, which makes him more anthropomorphic.

Channel-drop-it-and-get-out-of-here restless spirit

Channel-drop-it-and-get-out-of-here

In Japanese folklore, a local ghost from the town of Honjo in Tokyo's Sumida district, living in a canal and chasing fishermen who come too close to his dwelling.

Chanek anthropomorphic creature hurting people makes you wander memory lapses sounds without visible sources the distortion of time the harbinger of death the little creature the transition to another world

Chanek

Chanek or Chanek (Chanekeh, Chaneque or Ohuican Chaneque) are small, spirit-like creatures from Mexican folklore, considered to be elemental forces and guardians of nature.

In ancient legends, these creatures attacked intruders, scaring them so that their soul left their body, which they imprisoned in the depths of the earth. If the victim does not restore his soul with the help of a certain ritual, he will get sick and soon die.

In some modern legends, chanek is described as children with the face of old men or women who make people wander for three or seven days, after which the victims cannot remember what happened. It is believed that the creatures take their home in The underground world, the entrance to which is a dry kapok tree.

In Catholic beliefs, chaneka are the souls of children who died without Christian baptism.

Similar mythical creatures are common in Mesoamerican and other Latin American folklore traditions in general, called duende in Spanish. In the folklore tradition of the Yucatan Peninsula, these elementals are known as aluxob.

Chulbuses changes form hurting people

Chulbuses

In Altai mythology, evil spirits of the underworld. They send diseases, steal a person's soul. They appear in the form of a black vortex or in the image of a beautiful girl.

Chulguses changes form hurting people

Chulguses

In Altai mythology, evil spirits of the underworld. They send diseases, steal a person's soul. They appear in the form of a black vortex or in the image of a beautiful girl.

Chulme changes form hurting people

Chulme

In Altai mythology, evil spirits of the underworld. They send diseases, steal a person's soul. They appear in the form of a black vortex or in the image of a beautiful girl.

Chulmys changes form hurting people

Chulmys

In Altai mythology, evil spirits of the underworld. They send diseases, steal a person's soul. They appear in the form of a black vortex or in the image of a beautiful girl.

Crixus anthropomorphic creature hurting people

Crixus

In Belarusian folklore, an invisible woman without a tongue, eyes and ears. The evil ones look like humpback cats or dogs shod in high boots. They wear hats with earflaps. They are constantly engaged in sabotage and, when they get out from under the stove, they try to quickly make a mess.

According to beliefs, it is very difficult to get rid of Nedoli or evil spirits, but it is possible. To do this, you need to trick them into getting into the bag and throwing it into the swamp. The evil ones can be tied up and left on the road, lured under a stone, buried, etc. They will go to the one who releases them.

The evil spirits - in the mythology of the ancient Slavs - demonic creatures hostile to man, his evil, trouble, who obey the navi. They are invisible and live in the house or sit on the shoulders of a person, bringing misery and poverty.

Caudate animal body parts flying creature wings

Caudate

Poresko, or "Tailed", is the ninth and last child of Ana, the main gypsy demon of the disease.

According to gypsy beliefs, a demonic bird is the size of a one-year-old calf, with cat and dog heads and a snake tail sticking out of the trunk. Causes troubles and destruction.

Coastal varsels restless spirit sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Coastal varsels

In Swedish folklore, restless ghosts are the souls of sailors who died during a shipwreck. It is believed that during a storm you can hear their many thousands of roars.

Cyprus Lochness water creature

Cyprus Lochness

An aquatic creature from the folklore of Cyprus. This is a huge crocodile-like creature.  According to the descriptions of eyewitnesses, it looks like something similar to a crocodile or a huge snake. It has a shell, a crest, a mouth full of sharp fangs. He is sometimes called "The Felico Teras" i.e. "friendly monster".

The animal often appears near cities. But the most favorite place of the Cyprus Lochness is Cape Greco, the easternmost point of the island, located a few minutes drive from the city of Ayia Napa and is a habitat for rare plants.

The creature does not cause much harm (sometimes tears fishing nets).

Some believe that the Ayia Napa monster and Scylla (Skill) are the same thing.

Cornish Flyer anthropomorphic creature flying creature glowing eyes large creature wings

Cornish Flyer

A creature that was allegedly observed in the middle of 1976 in the village of Mavnan in the English county of Cornwall. It is also known by the names "Cornish man, "Cornish owl Man" or "owl man from Mawnan", "Cornish Owlman", "Owlman", "Owlman of Mawnan", "Cornish Flyer".​‌ ​​​‌‌​ ​​‌‌‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​​‌‌​‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​‌ ​​‌​​‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​​‌‌​ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

In the cryptozoological literature, it is sometimes compared to the American cryptid human moth.

Outwardly, it resembles a very large owl, down to the structure of the leg, i.e. the location of the fingers of two in front and two behind.

Cornish Oulman anthropomorphic creature flying creature glowing eyes large creature wings

Cornish Oulman

A creature that was allegedly observed in the middle of 1976 in the village of Mavnan in the English county of Cornwall. It is also known by the names "Cornish man, "Cornish owl Man" or "owl man from Mawnan", "Cornish Owlman", "Owlman", "Owlman of Mawnan", "Cornish Flyer".​‌ ​​​‌‌​ ​​‌‌‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​​‌‌​‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​‌ ​​‌​​‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​​‌‌​ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

In the cryptozoological literature, it is sometimes compared to the American cryptid human moth.

Outwardly, it resembles a very large owl, down to the structure of the leg, i.e. the location of the fingers of two in front and two behind.

Cryosphinx animal body parts anthropomorphic creature pass the device or knowledge specifies the location of the treasure

Cryosphinx

A creature from Egyptian mythology. Usually it is a creature with the head of a woman, the paws and body of a lion and the wings of an eagle.

However , in ancient Egypt there were three types of sphinxes:

  • androsphinx — with a lion's body and a human head; cryosphinx — with a ram's head and a human body; hieracosphinx — with a falcon's head and a human body.

He can point the way (skip) to the treasures or share knowledge. He is known as a lover of riddles.

Crookshanks generating a fire creature large creature scales wings

Crookshanks

The Wawel dragon or Wawel tzmok (in Polish, "smok wawelski", aka całożerca, aka holophagus - that is, a creature that swallows its victims whole, a zhivoglot) is a creature from Polish folklore that lives in a cave (called Dragon pit) at the foot Wawel Hill in Krakow.

Once a week, a cow was to be sacrificed to the dragon; if he did not receive it, he devoured people in return. On numerous monuments, he is depicted as a huge lizard-like creature with wings, spewing fire.

Chukla hurting people turns into an animal water creature

Chukla

Vakul (aka Va, Kul vasa, chukla, i.e. "curve") — this is a mythological character of the Komi peoples, a merman who lives in reservoirs with his family. This is the spirit of the underwater world, which has an evil character, because of which it messes with people (it may even attack and drown), but it can also help a person in gratitude for the service rendered. Vakul is served by watermen, who are called vasas. 

He can appear in the form of a whirlwind. He has long green hair, which he likes to comb, disentangling mud from them. He goes out to graze his cows on the banks of the rivers, which leave no traces.

It was believed that the family of the Vakul consists of pike, and he can turn into a pike.

Candles of the deceased a small light at the earth's surface fire with no apparent source flying object helps you find your way restless spirit specifies the location of the treasure

Candles of the deceased

This phenomenon includes two types of lights:

  • Ground-level (chasing travelers, but not rising above two meters from the road)
  • High (located high above the ground, at the level of clouds)

The first include the classic "Swamp lights" they are also "Will-o'-the-wisps".  They are usually described as "a light that moves by itself not far from the traveler."

They can also be called "lights of Marfa and Saratoga", "Min-Min". These lights intimidated travelers in ancient times, but they are also observed in our time.

The color of such a fire can be blue, yellow, greenish and white. Basically, these lights appear in swamps, cemeteries, sometimes in forests and even less often near reservoirs and fields. They are shaped like a candle flame, but more often spherical. The height of the "flight" is from the ground to the height of a person's raised arm. They move unevenly – they burn for a short time, only a few seconds, after which another one may flare up nearby.

Some legends say that such lights live where violent death has occurred (often more than one).

A small number of legends and eyewitness accounts claim that such lights, on the contrary, help to protect themselves from trouble and even escape.

In almost all corners of the world, since ancient times, there have been various legends about the appearance of phenomena similar in descriptions to Will-o'-the-Wisps.

In Slovak and Czech mythology, a similar phenomenon is called a Harlot. It is believed that these are swamp and water spirits that appear near the water in the form of will-o'-the-wisps.

There are similar lights in England. There they are better known as Jack O'lantem, Body Light or Body Candle.

There is some analogy in the Irish legend about the stingy blacksmith-drinker Jack, who twice deceived the Devil and received from him a promise not to plot against Jack, not to attempt on his body, and also not to claim his soul after death. However, Jack could not use the privileges he received as a drinker, because he soon died. After death, the sinner was not allowed into paradise. Neither God nor the Devil needed Jack. The restless Irishman, waiting for the Day of Judgment, was forced to wander the earth, lighting his way with a piece of coal, which the devil finally threw to him. Jack put a smoldering ember in an empty pumpkin and set off to wander around the world.

If the first option is associated with the souls of the dead, then the second option is tightly connected with the UFO phenomenon.

Now the most famous place for the appearance of such high lights is considered to be the southwest of Queensland in Australia (Alexandria Station). In the USA, the Saragoga and Marfa lights in Texas, the Brown Mountain and Mako lights in North Carolina and the "ghost Hornet lights" in Missouri are also known.

This can also include Fireballs are naked. It is believed that this is a natural phenomenon observed once a year on the river Mekong in Thailand (Isan region) and Laos. It consists in the fact that glowing balls, similar to reddish chicken eggs, rise from the depths of the river. The balls rise 10-20 meters above the river and disappear. The most frequent appearance of fireballs was recorded in October, on the eve of the holiday Pavarana, although they were also observed at other times of the year. In honor of the appearance of balloons in the city A festival is held in Nong Khai and neighboring villages, which together with the natural phenomenon itself attracts many tourists.

It is assumed that the balls appear as a result of fermentation of suspended matter carried by the river, which ignites as a result of certain atmospheric conditions.

Hypotheses

Scientific hypotheses

Among the scientific hypotheses of the appearance of swamp lights , the following can be distinguished:

  • Spontaneous combustion of gaseous phosphorous hydrogen and methane formed during the rotting of dead plant and animal organisms.
  • Bioluminescence, for example, of honey bees or fireflies.
  • Ball lightning
  • The lights of St. Elmo. This is a discharge in the form of luminous beams or tassels (or a crown discharge) that occurs at the sharp ends of tall objects. 
  • A mirage. Jack Pettigrew, a professor at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, believes that these are mirror mirage phenomena from possibly small light sources that are sometimes even hundreds of kilometers away. For example, it may be the reflection of the front and/or rear headlights of cars moving along a remote highway.
  • Perhaps the explanation of the phenomenon may be similar to the cause of the appearance of Fireballs Naked, although they are completely incomprehensible. It is assumed that the balls appear as a result of fermentation of suspended matter carried by the river, which ignites as a result of certain atmospheric conditions.

Scientific hypotheses

There are also a number of hypotheses that are similar to scientific ones on the principle of explanation, but have not found support in scientific circles:

  • The lights are the glow of radioactive fallout
  • Triboluminescence is the glow of gas as a result of the friction of crystalline rocks in tectonic faults.

Mystical hypotheses

The most ancient explanations of this phenomenon are considered mystical hypotheses based on ideas about certain entities living in their own (parallel with us) world:

  • Plasmoids, as a special form of life.
  • The souls of people who died a violent death, and now stuck between worlds.
  • The spirits of the treasure light lights over the hidden treasure to point the way to it.
  • UFO

In the Archive, we will link only those facts with this phenomenon that relate to surface observations.

Result

Authentic Wandering lights (ground lights) appearing in cemeteries and swamps have been explained for a long time - the result of the ignition of phosphine and methane.

Nag fireballs also probably appear as a result of fermentation of suspended matter carried by the river, which ignites as a result of certain atmospheric conditions.

The Min-min light dancing above the horizon, according to the conclusion of the Australian scientist Jack Pettigrew, turned out to be a mirage: the light from the headlights combined with the atmospheric "tunnel" effect (light travels, without scattering, in the layer of cold air between the earth's surface and a layer of warmer air and the curvature of the light rays occurs due to an abnormal distribution of the refractive index.

Crocodile-pig animal body parts generating a fire creature

Crocodile-pig

In ancient Chinese mythology, "Dragon-pig" or "Crocodile-pig". It has a length of about three meters, a short mouth and four legs, its back and tail are covered with hard and thick scales.

Cytiron anthropomorphic creature fish tail water creature

Cytiron

A medieval aquatic creature, which is a knight's body clad in armor combined with the tail of a large fish.

D

Damavikas choking victim fireball flying creature sexual relations with the victim specifies the location of the treasure

Damavikas

In Lithuanian mythology, a flying spirit in the form of a fiery serpent, a dragon, sometimes a black crow, a heron, a black or fiery rooster, less often a cat.

He flies over the trees, leaving a trail of fire. It can indicate where the treasure is buried, falling on this place in the form of a star. He can come to women and strangle them at night. Can engage in sexual intercourse with them as an incubus.

According to one version , the word Aitvaras comes from the Lithuanian aiti — tramp, shifty, tomboy and varas — very fast movement. According to another version, the name is associated with the word aitauti — quiet, calm, but this version is less common. The etymology can also be related to the Iranian pativara, as well as the Polish poczwara — an evil spirit, a nightmare.

 

Domovikas choking victim fireball flying creature sexual relations with the victim specifies the location of the treasure

Domovikas

In Lithuanian mythology, a flying spirit in the form of a fiery serpent, a dragon, sometimes a black crow, a heron, a black or fiery rooster, less often a cat.

He flies over the trees, leaving a trail of fire. It can indicate where the treasure is buried, falling on this place in the form of a star. He can come to women and strangle them at night. Can engage in sexual intercourse with them as an incubus.

According to one version , the word Aitvaras comes from the Lithuanian aiti — tramp, shifty, tomboy and varas — very fast movement. According to another version, the name is associated with the word aitauti — quiet, calm, but this version is less common. The etymology can also be related to the Iranian pativara, as well as the Polish poczwara — an evil spirit, a nightmare.

 

Death Eater animal body parts

Death Eater

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Devourer animal body parts

Devourer

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

District afraid of sunlight animal body parts

District

The idea of this creature came from Greek mythology (a small snake with a white spot on its head), but in medieval Europe it underwent some changes. There he turned into a monster with the body of a toad, the tail of a snake and the head of a rooster. His fetid breath kills everything in the neighborhood, and his gaze makes you petrify.

According to ancient belief, basilisks were born from the eggs of the ibis bird, which, feeding on the eggs of snakes, sometimes lays its own eggs through its beak. The English scientist Alexander Nekam (XII century.) in his essay wrote: ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

"Every time an old rooster lays an egg that a toad bears, a basilisk is born."

You can kill him by directing the sun's rays into his eyes with a mirror (there is a version that he will turn to stone when he sees his reflection in the mirror).

Basilisk (from others-Greek βᾰσῐλίσκος — king; also Lat. basiliscus, regulus, English basilisk, cockatrice).

Dedko bolotny anthropomorphic creature hairy creature long limbs the distortion of time water creature

Dedko bolotny

The evil spirit is the master of the swamp in East Slavic mythology. The female version is called bolotnitsa. 

Other names: bolotny, bolotny dedko, the fool of the swamp, the swamp devil, the swamp goblin, the king of the swamp, the swamp; as well as antsybal /antsibul /antsibalka /antsibolit / anchibal/ anchibol, zybochnik, kochechny, omutny; belor. balotnik; Ukrainian bolotyanik, antsibol, netecha[, ocheretyanik (from ocheret — "reed"). 

Antsybal — according to one version is a long-standing borrowing from the Baltic languages, comparable to Lit. ančiabalis — "duck swamp"; according to another version, this is a borrowing of the Czech ančibél, which could be the result of contamination of the words antikrist — "antichrist", and d'abel — "devil", and the convergence of the end part with the swamp occurred later; according to the third version, this is the result of the contraction of the expressions antichrist swamp, antip swamp, antiy bolotny through the intermediate antsibolotnik and antsibolot.

In the Russian North, they usually talked about the female spirit of the swamp, its mistress, the mistress of the tundra — the swamp woman, the swamp woman.

Often, the spirit living in the swamp was considered just a kind of water, a goblin or a devil, and the image of a swamp girl was mixed with the images of a leshachiha, a "free old woman", a mermaid, a water woman and a swamp kikimora.

The appearance of the swampman: a dirty, fat, eyeless creature sitting motionless at the bottom of the swamp, similar to a shaggy man with long arms and a tail. Sometimes it is a shaggy man with long arms and a tail.

It was believed that the swampman and the swamp woman lure a person or animal into a quagmire, where he dies.

Any sounds of the swamp were attributed to the swampman: to lure a person, he quacks like a duck, gurgles like a grouse, roars like a cow (the voice of a drink), moans or laughs (the voices of a white partridge and a snipe on the current).

Also, the swamper, in order to lure the traveler, lights lights in the swamp at night and grows flowers with an alluring aroma.

Domozhil anthropomorphic creature changes form choking victim hairy creature helps helps to find the lost thing hurting people predicts the future turns into an animal

Domozhil

The house of the Slavic peoples is called the mythological spirit - the owner and patron of the house. The image of the brownie in the representations of the Slavs is known primarily from folk tales and epics recorded in the XVIII-XX centuries, but a similar spirit is found in the mythologies of different peoples, regardless of the habitat and common beliefs.

As a rule, it is believed that the spirit of a deceased ancestor becomes the patron of the house. This is typical for many peoples: for the ancient Greeks, where the keepers of the house and hearth were called geniuses, and for the Romans, who called the patron gods of the hearth penates, for the Chinese, Slavs, etc.

Among the Eastern Slavs , the house is most often called:

  • by habitat: rus. domovoy, domovoiko, domovoy grandfather, belor. damavik, domnik, khatnik, ukr. brownie;
  • by location in the house: rus. golbeshnik (golbets — partition behind the oven), zapechnik, belor. podpechnik.
  • according to his status in the house and relations with family members: rus. the owner, the izbyan bolshak, the grandfather-brother, the bro, the dobrohotushko, the shaggy hostess; belor. ladies' khazyain, the lord, the biggest, uncle, brother, grandfather, sioiski; ukr. khazyain, did, bogatir,
  • according to the main functions and manifestations: rus. breadwinner, zhirovik, brush, lizun, ukr. gurkalo.
  • according to his belonging to the evil spirit: Rus. dashing, the other half, fat devil, belor. damn damavy, not your spirit, likhadzei, ukr. domoviy, dyabel, unclean.

The names of the brownie can be taboo: rus. himself, he, often with the help of metathesis: rus. modoveyko, modozhirko, ukr. dombeyko.

The corresponding female characters are named: rus. domovikha, modovikha, domovilikha, domakha, mistress.

In Polesie, especially in the west, names characteristic of evil spirits in general were often used in relation to the brownie (domovik): Satan, crafty, evil spirit, filth, enemy, nyachystik, lyakailo, puzhalo, nachnik, unkind soul, dead man, death, "that, shcho pamer", witch doctor, koydunnik.

Synonyms are: Brownie; Brownie; Grandfather; Posten; Posten; Lizun; Domozhil; Owner; Zhirovik; Undead; Susedko; Bratanushko; Guardian Spirit; Abuser of the house; Baked; Podpechnik; Podpolnik; Golbeshnik.

Among the Western Slavs, the brownie was more often represented as a snake and was called domowy, ubożę, stwor, chobold, kobold, kłobuk, karzełek skrzat, inkluz, plonek, latawiec, domownik, stopan, żmij, chowaniec.

  • Czech: Dědek, had hospodáříček, had domovníček (the snake lives under the threshold of the house and brings good luck)
  • Slovak: Domovik
  • Polish: Domowoj, domowik, dziad, vygorishche
  • at luzhichan: nócnénědky

The Southern Slavs:

  • Serbian: domaћi usluzhni duh, maliћ, maciћ, doma,i, škrat or shpiritus. In Bosnia and Banate could be called a "domestic imp" (Serbo-Croatian. kuћni ђavolak)
  • Bulgarian: stopan
  • Croatian: Domaći
  • Slovenian: Domovoj

There are different variants of the origin of faith in the brownie. There is an assumption that it originates from those times when a "construction sacrifice" was laid in the foundation of a new building. Initially they were people, later animals were sacrificed. According to another theory, the idea of the patron spirit of the house appeared as a result of the pagan cult of ancestors.

On the territory of Russia, with the advent of Christianity, the brownie began to be considered a demon, like other pagan deities. To get rid of it, it was necessary to consecrate the house. On the territory of Ukraine and Belarus, on the contrary, the brownie eventually became considered a good spirit sent by God to protect the house. This is confirmed by the ideas about possible clashes of the brownie with the bannik, the goblin and other "evil" spirits.

It is not difficult to guess that most often the hearth is considered the domovoi's place of residence, but it can also live in the red corner, the basement, in the attic and even under the threshold.

The appearance of the brownie, judging by the descriptions of eyewitnesses, can also be different. He usually appears to be a shaggy creature of small stature. Sometimes it has animal features, but more often it looks like an ordinary short person. He can also take the form of any family member (especially absent), an animal (most often snakes, weasels, cats, roosters, rats).

Usually a brownie is considered a male being, but along with the male image of a brownie, there is also a female one. Usually this is the wife (domovikha) and daughter (domovinka) of a brownie.

The brownie often appears in the stories of eyewitnesses in various manifestations:

Noisy spirit. Poltergeist phenomena are often associated with a brownie. According to some ideas, he can slam doors, creak floorboards, scream, groan, talk and even hit and pinch a person. This may be due to both the bad character of the brownie, and the fact that usually a good brownie is not happy with something (swearing, disorder, bad relations with children or animals, etc.). A less popular version explains such phenomena by the struggle of the brownie with an evil spirit trying to get into the house.

The predictor. It is believed that a brownie is able to predict the future to the owners of the house: usually he approaches a sleeping person and leans on his chest so that he can neither breathe nor move, and if at this moment he asks the brownie "for better or for worse?", then he will answer. Scientists explain this condition by sleep paralysis.

Hiding things. Another action closely associated with the brownie is the loss of things. If a person cannot find some thing that is usually lying in a prominent place, then it is considered that a brownie took it. To find a thing, it is customary to say: "brownie-brownie, play and give it away!". Another way is to turn the stool over and tie a handkerchief on its leg. After these manipulations, the thing should be found.

The image of the brownie described in this article refers not only to the patron of the house itself, but also to the patron spirits of other buildings. In the representations of some (mostly living in the north) peoples, the brownie is "divided" into characters-doubles, individual owners of each building or even each functional space of the house (a baking dish, a podpechnik, a golbeshnik - a spirit living behind the stove or under it; an underground worker - a spirit living underground; etc.).

The image described here was deformed under the influence of changes in people's everyday life. So, in private houses, the brownie moves not only around the house, but can also look into the barn, chicken coop, backyard. In the manor houses, the brownie was in charge of all the houses of the farmstead. According to modern ideas, a brownie can live not only in a residential building (each apartment has its own), but also in a garage, shed and even in an office.

Divya people anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body high being

Divya people

In Russian folklore, the people of white-eyed giants with faces on their chests, who lived in the north.

According to another version, they live underground and are close to European dwarfs in meaning: people of short stature, while fabulously rich.

According to the third version, the chud has turned into evil spirits who hide in dark places, abandoned dwellings, baths, even under water. They are invisible, leave behind traces of bird paws or children's feet, harm people and can replace their children with their own. This makes them related to the fairies of Irish folklore.

These are ancient mythical people, characters of Russian, Finno-Ugric[3] (including Komi) folklore. It is also found in Sami folklore.

Dahu hooves

Dahu

A creature with horns and hooves from folklore The Alps, which lives only in the mountains. 

Since this animal is a mountain animal, its evolution has evolved towards shortening the legs on the one hand and lengthening on the other so that it can stand normally on steep slopes.

There are two types of Dahu — left-sided and right-sided. The first one has shorter legs on the left side, so he can only walk on the mountain counterclockwise. The right-hand side can only go around the mountain clockwise. It is believed that these two subspecies of dahu do not mix in nature, as they meet only face to face. If it still happened that they crossed, from this connection, the so-called "dead dahu" is born, having short legs not on one side of the body, but diagonally, that is, it is either a short front left and rear right, or front right and rear left.

It is believed that the locals joked about the visitors, involving them in the hunt for a "rare" and non-existent animal, forcing them to crawl for hours in an uncomfortable position in the mountains in the wind and freeze in ambush.

Dahut hooves

Dahut

A creature with horns and hooves from folklore The Alps, which lives only in the mountains. 

Since this animal is a mountain animal, its evolution has evolved towards shortening the legs on the one hand and lengthening on the other so that it can stand normally on steep slopes.

There are two types of Dahu — left-sided and right-sided. The first one has shorter legs on the left side, so he can only walk on the mountain counterclockwise. The right-hand side can only go around the mountain clockwise. It is believed that these two subspecies of dahu do not mix in nature, as they meet only face to face. If it still happened that they crossed, from this connection, the so-called "dead dahu" is born, having short legs not on one side of the body, but diagonally, that is, it is either a short front left and rear right, or front right and rear left.

It is believed that the locals joked about the visitors, involving them in the hunt for a "rare" and non-existent animal, forcing them to crawl for hours in an uncomfortable position in the mountains in the wind and freeze in ambush.

Dairi hooves

Dairi

A creature with horns and hooves from folklore The Alps, which lives only in the mountains. 

Since this animal is a mountain animal, its evolution has evolved towards shortening the legs on the one hand and lengthening on the other so that it can stand normally on steep slopes.

There are two types of Dahu — left-sided and right-sided. The first one has shorter legs on the left side, so he can only walk on the mountain counterclockwise. The right-hand side can only go around the mountain clockwise. It is believed that these two subspecies of dahu do not mix in nature, as they meet only face to face. If it still happened that they crossed, from this connection, the so-called "dead dahu" is born, having short legs not on one side of the body, but diagonally, that is, it is either a short front left and rear right, or front right and rear left.

It is believed that the locals joked about the visitors, involving them in the hunt for a "rare" and non-existent animal, forcing them to crawl for hours in an uncomfortable position in the mountains in the wind and freeze in ambush.

Darow hooves

Darow

A creature with horns and hooves from folklore The Alps, which lives only in the mountains. 

Since this animal is a mountain animal, its evolution has evolved towards shortening the legs on the one hand and lengthening on the other so that it can stand normally on steep slopes.

There are two types of Dahu — left-sided and right-sided. The first one has shorter legs on the left side, so he can only walk on the mountain counterclockwise. The right-hand side can only go around the mountain clockwise. It is believed that these two subspecies of dahu do not mix in nature, as they meet only face to face. If it still happened that they crossed, from this connection, the so-called "dead dahu" is born, having short legs not on one side of the body, but diagonally, that is, it is either a short front left and rear right, or front right and rear left.

It is believed that the locals joked about the visitors, involving them in the hunt for a "rare" and non-existent animal, forcing them to crawl for hours in an uncomfortable position in the mountains in the wind and freeze in ambush.

Daru hooves

Daru

A creature with horns and hooves from folklore The Alps, which lives only in the mountains. 

Since this animal is a mountain animal, its evolution has evolved towards shortening the legs on the one hand and lengthening on the other so that it can stand normally on steep slopes.

There are two types of Dahu — left-sided and right-sided. The first one has shorter legs on the left side, so he can only walk on the mountain counterclockwise. The right-hand side can only go around the mountain clockwise. It is believed that these two subspecies of dahu do not mix in nature, as they meet only face to face. If it still happened that they crossed, from this connection, the so-called "dead dahu" is born, having short legs not on one side of the body, but diagonally, that is, it is either a short front left and rear right, or front right and rear left.

It is believed that the locals joked about the visitors, involving them in the hunt for a "rare" and non-existent animal, forcing them to crawl for hours in an uncomfortable position in the mountains in the wind and freeze in ambush.

Dahuot hooves

Dahuot

A creature with horns and hooves from folklore The Alps, which lives only in the mountains. 

Since this animal is a mountain animal, its evolution has evolved towards shortening the legs on the one hand and lengthening on the other so that it can stand normally on steep slopes.

There are two types of Dahu — left-sided and right-sided. The first one has shorter legs on the left side, so he can only walk on the mountain counterclockwise. The right-hand side can only go around the mountain clockwise. It is believed that these two subspecies of dahu do not mix in nature, as they meet only face to face. If it still happened that they crossed, from this connection, the so-called "dead dahu" is born, having short legs not on one side of the body, but diagonally, that is, it is either a short front left and rear right, or front right and rear left.

It is believed that the locals joked about the visitors, involving them in the hunt for a "rare" and non-existent animal, forcing them to crawl for hours in an uncomfortable position in the mountains in the wind and freeze in ambush.

Davalpa anthropomorphic creature stretches limbs

Davalpa

In Arabic-Persian folklore, creatures with long, soft, boneless legs, which they wrap around their victims and force them to work for themselves. Its long legs resemble snakes or belts, and above the waist it looks like a man.

Degder animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fastest thing high being superpowered creature unusual eye color

Degder

A creature from Somali folklore. She is usually described as a large, tall and very strong woman with long, donkey ears that can hear the steps of her victim for many kilometers, and blood-red eyes with very sharp vision. She moves very fast.

Dev animal body parts anthropomorphic creature high being

Dev

Divas, devas (avest. 𐬛𐬀𐬉𐬎𐬎𐬀 daēuua, daāua, daēva) - supernatural humanoid beings.

In various Indian religious and mythological traditions, under this name "Devas" it is customary to understand many supernatural beings, also called deities, gods or demigods. 

In Iranian mythology, devas are demonic entities. Folklore devas of the Iranian, Turkic, Armenian, Georgian, Dagestan peoples are giants covered with fur, with sharp claws on their hands and feet, with terrible faces. They are often very rich, because they own (manage, protect) the treasures of the earth — precious metals and stones. 

Devas often have a beast—like appearance, and sometimes several heads (up to a hundred heads - Georgian devas, for example, with an increase in the number of heads, their strength increases, and a new one grows in place of a chopped head), there are also cyclops-like ones. They like to kidnap girls.

Div animal body parts anthropomorphic creature high being

Div

Divas, devas (avest. 𐬛𐬀𐬉𐬎𐬎𐬀 daēuua, daāua, daēva) - supernatural humanoid beings.

In various Indian religious and mythological traditions, under this name "Devas" it is customary to understand many supernatural beings, also called deities, gods or demigods. 

In Iranian mythology, devas are demonic entities. Folklore devas of the Iranian, Turkic, Armenian, Georgian, Dagestan peoples are giants covered with fur, with sharp claws on their hands and feet, with terrible faces. They are often very rich, because they own (manage, protect) the treasures of the earth — precious metals and stones. 

Devas often have a beast—like appearance, and sometimes several heads (up to a hundred heads - Georgian devas, for example, with an increase in the number of heads, their strength increases, and a new one grows in place of a chopped head), there are also cyclops-like ones. They like to kidnap girls.

Dingball sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dingball

A creature from the folklore of the New England states. It looks like a panther with a ball on the end of its tail. Loggers often hear a knock of unknown origin in the woods, as if someone is hitting the trees with something hard, and attribute these sounds to this creature.

Dingmol sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dingmol

A creature from the folklore of the New England states. It looks like a panther with a ball on the end of its tail. Loggers often hear a knock of unknown origin in the woods, as if someone is hitting the trees with something hard, and attribute these sounds to this creature.

Dobie helps helps to find the lost thing restless spirit specifies the location of the treasure

Dobie

A creature from the mythology of the borderlands between Scotland and England. He is considered a ghost, tied to a certain place. He could also be a house spirit similar to a brownie, and could also guard the treasure. The ego is distinguished by a not very developed mind.

The first mention of Dobie falls on the "Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft" by Walter Scott, now known mainly thanks to the Harry Potter books.

Usually a spirit can be tied to a place for two reasons. Either it's a kind of brownie like brownie, or it's the spirit of a person killed in this place (that's why pirates often created a guard spirit, killing a person in the place where the treasure is hidden).

Dobie is probably the restless spirits. for example, there is a legend about the ghost of a woman killed, according to legend, by her jealous husband. Her ghost was called "Dobie Mortam Tower", and it was said that her blood still periodically appears on the steps of the old Mortam Tower. She annoyed the servants so much that the local priest was called, who drove the ghost under the bridge. The bridge itself in 1771 made sense during the flood and after that no one heard about the ghost anymore.

Dobby helps helps to find the lost thing restless spirit specifies the location of the treasure

Dobby

A creature from the mythology of the borderlands between Scotland and England. He is considered a ghost, tied to a certain place. He could also be a house spirit similar to a brownie, and could also guard the treasure. The ego is distinguished by a not very developed mind.

The first mention of Dobie falls on the "Letters on Demonology and Witchcraft" by Walter Scott, now known mainly thanks to the Harry Potter books.

Usually a spirit can be tied to a place for two reasons. Either it's a kind of brownie like brownie, or it's the spirit of a person killed in this place (that's why pirates often created a guard spirit, killing a person in the place where the treasure is hidden).

Dobie is probably the restless spirits. for example, there is a legend about the ghost of a woman killed, according to legend, by her jealous husband. Her ghost was called "Dobie Mortam Tower", and it was said that her blood still periodically appears on the steps of the old Mortam Tower. She annoyed the servants so much that the local priest was called, who drove the ghost under the bridge. The bridge itself in 1771 made sense during the flood and after that no one heard about the ghost anymore.

Dobrokhodiy hairy creature helps high being the little creature turns into an animal

Dobrokhodiy

In Belarusian and Polish mythology, the forest spirit, which remains the patron of the trees used in the construction of the hut, while becoming a house spirit.

He can change his height, appear in the form of snakes, birds, as well as creatures completely covered with black wool — sheep, dogs and even shaggy people. Often helps with the housework.

Dabrahojy hairy creature helps high being the little creature turns into an animal

Dabrahojy

In Belarusian and Polish mythology, the forest spirit, which remains the patron of the trees used in the construction of the hut, while becoming a house spirit.

He can change his height, appear in the form of snakes, birds, as well as creatures completely covered with black wool — sheep, dogs and even shaggy people. Often helps with the housework.

Dabrakhody hairy creature helps high being the little creature turns into an animal

Dabrakhody

In Belarusian and Polish mythology, the forest spirit, which remains the patron of the trees used in the construction of the hut, while becoming a house spirit.

He can change his height, appear in the form of snakes, birds, as well as creatures completely covered with black wool — sheep, dogs and even shaggy people. Often helps with the housework.

Dabrakhot hairy creature helps high being the little creature turns into an animal

Dabrakhot

In Belarusian and Polish mythology, the forest spirit, which remains the patron of the trees used in the construction of the hut, while becoming a house spirit.

He can change his height, appear in the form of snakes, birds, as well as creatures completely covered with black wool — sheep, dogs and even shaggy people. Often helps with the housework.

Dabrahochy hairy creature helps high being the little creature turns into an animal

Dabrahochy

In Belarusian and Polish mythology, the forest spirit, which remains the patron of the trees used in the construction of the hut, while becoming a house spirit.

He can change his height, appear in the form of snakes, birds, as well as creatures completely covered with black wool — sheep, dogs and even shaggy people. Often helps with the housework.

Do - gooder hairy creature helps high being the little creature turns into an animal

Do - gooder

In Belarusian and Polish mythology, the forest spirit, which remains the patron of the trees used in the construction of the hut, while becoming a house spirit.

He can change his height, appear in the form of snakes, birds, as well as creatures completely covered with black wool — sheep, dogs and even shaggy people. Often helps with the housework.

Dodomeki anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body restless spirit

Dodomeki

In Japanese folklore, cursed women are thieves with very long arms covered with tiny bird eyes.

Domovichka anthropomorphic creature sexual relations with the victim

Domovichka

In Belarusian folklore, a female house spirit (the daughter of house spirits), prone to lovemaking with human guys.

Domovinka anthropomorphic creature sexual relations with the victim

Domovinka

In Belarusian folklore, a female house spirit (the daughter of house spirits), prone to lovemaking with human guys.

Dotam sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dotam

In the folklore of the Ketov (small people Western Siberia) is a female creature living in the taiga and mountains. Scares people with his scream.

It is capable of destroying a person, but even if he is not afraid, he can cope with it, win with cunning, intelligence, courage. ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Young Chum salmon familiar with Russian folklore call her by analogy "baba-yaga", but sometimes dootam is used as a substitute for the forbidden name Hosedam — the wife of the supreme god Yesya, expelled by him from Heaven, as a negative beginning of the Ket pantheon.​‌‌​‌‌​ 

Interestingly, in 1987, the Vereshchagin residents showed a pit on the old airfield site, where it was believed that Dootam lived. She left her abode, frightened by geological tracked all-terrain vehicles and other equipment.​

Dootem sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dootem

In the folklore of the Ketov (small people Western Siberia) is a female creature living in the taiga and mountains. Scares people with his scream.

It is capable of destroying a person, but even if he is not afraid, he can cope with it, win with cunning, intelligence, courage. ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Young Chum salmon familiar with Russian folklore call her by analogy "baba-yaga", but sometimes dootam is used as a substitute for the forbidden name Hosedam — the wife of the supreme god Yesya, expelled by him from Heaven, as a negative beginning of the Ket pantheon.​‌‌​‌‌​ 

Interestingly, in 1987, the Vereshchagin residents showed a pit on the old airfield site, where it was believed that Dootam lived. She left her abode, frightened by geological tracked all-terrain vehicles and other equipment.​

Dotet bat sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dotet bat

In the folklore of the Ketov (small people Western Siberia) is a female creature living in the taiga and mountains. Scares people with his scream.

It is capable of destroying a person, but even if he is not afraid, he can cope with it, win with cunning, intelligence, courage. ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Young Chum salmon familiar with Russian folklore call her by analogy "baba-yaga", but sometimes dootam is used as a substitute for the forbidden name Hosedam — the wife of the supreme god Yesya, expelled by him from Heaven, as a negative beginning of the Ket pantheon.​‌‌​‌‌​ 

Interestingly, in 1987, the Vereshchagin residents showed a pit on the old airfield site, where it was believed that Dootam lived. She left her abode, frightened by geological tracked all-terrain vehicles and other equipment.​

Dotet sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dotet

In the folklore of the Ketov (small people Western Siberia) is a female creature living in the taiga and mountains. Scares people with his scream.

It is capable of destroying a person, but even if he is not afraid, he can cope with it, win with cunning, intelligence, courage. ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Young Chum salmon familiar with Russian folklore call her by analogy "baba-yaga", but sometimes dootam is used as a substitute for the forbidden name Hosedam — the wife of the supreme god Yesya, expelled by him from Heaven, as a negative beginning of the Ket pantheon.​‌‌​‌‌​ 

Interestingly, in 1987, the Vereshchagin residents showed a pit on the old airfield site, where it was believed that Dootam lived. She left her abode, frightened by geological tracked all-terrain vehicles and other equipment.​

Dootadam sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dootadam

In the folklore of the Ketov (small people Western Siberia) is a female creature living in the taiga and mountains. Scares people with his scream.

It is capable of destroying a person, but even if he is not afraid, he can cope with it, win with cunning, intelligence, courage. ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Young Chum salmon familiar with Russian folklore call her by analogy "baba-yaga", but sometimes dootam is used as a substitute for the forbidden name Hosedam — the wife of the supreme god Yesya, expelled by him from Heaven, as a negative beginning of the Ket pantheon.​‌‌​‌‌​ 

Interestingly, in 1987, the Vereshchagin residents showed a pit on the old airfield site, where it was believed that Dootam lived. She left her abode, frightened by geological tracked all-terrain vehicles and other equipment.​

Dootam bam sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dootam bam

In the folklore of the Ketov (small people Western Siberia) is a female creature living in the taiga and mountains. Scares people with his scream.

It is capable of destroying a person, but even if he is not afraid, he can cope with it, win with cunning, intelligence, courage. ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Young Chum salmon familiar with Russian folklore call her by analogy "baba-yaga", but sometimes dootam is used as a substitute for the forbidden name Hosedam — the wife of the supreme god Yesya, expelled by him from Heaven, as a negative beginning of the Ket pantheon.​‌‌​‌‌​ 

Interestingly, in 1987, the Vereshchagin residents showed a pit on the old airfield site, where it was believed that Dootam lived. She left her abode, frightened by geological tracked all-terrain vehicles and other equipment.​

Dootham bam sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dootham bam

In the folklore of the Ketov (small people Western Siberia) is a female creature living in the taiga and mountains. Scares people with his scream.

It is capable of destroying a person, but even if he is not afraid, he can cope with it, win with cunning, intelligence, courage. ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Young Chum salmon familiar with Russian folklore call her by analogy "baba-yaga", but sometimes dootam is used as a substitute for the forbidden name Hosedam — the wife of the supreme god Yesya, expelled by him from Heaven, as a negative beginning of the Ket pantheon.​‌‌​‌‌​ 

Interestingly, in 1987, the Vereshchagin residents showed a pit on the old airfield site, where it was believed that Dootam lived. She left her abode, frightened by geological tracked all-terrain vehicles and other equipment.​

Dotodam sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Dotodam

In the folklore of the Ketov (small people Western Siberia) is a female creature living in the taiga and mountains. Scares people with his scream.

It is capable of destroying a person, but even if he is not afraid, he can cope with it, win with cunning, intelligence, courage. ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Young Chum salmon familiar with Russian folklore call her by analogy "baba-yaga", but sometimes dootam is used as a substitute for the forbidden name Hosedam — the wife of the supreme god Yesya, expelled by him from Heaven, as a negative beginning of the Ket pantheon.​‌‌​‌‌​ 

Interestingly, in 1987, the Vereshchagin residents showed a pit on the old airfield site, where it was believed that Dootam lived. She left her abode, frightened by geological tracked all-terrain vehicles and other equipment.​

Double anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death

Double

Doppelganger, Mimic or Doppelganger - in many cultures, a copy of a person, foreshadowing an imminent death. Sometimes it does not cast shadows and is not reflected in the mirror.

Sometimes it is believed that this is a werewolf capable of reproducing with high accuracy the appearance and behavior of the one he copies. Or his spirit, which came out of the body or came from another world.

Doppelganger anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death

Doppelganger

Doppelganger, Mimic or Doppelganger - in many cultures, a copy of a person, foreshadowing an imminent death. Sometimes it does not cast shadows and is not reflected in the mirror.

Sometimes it is believed that this is a werewolf capable of reproducing with high accuracy the appearance and behavior of the one he copies. Or his spirit, which came out of the body or came from another world.

Dragon flying creature generating a fire creature scales the glowing areas of the body wings

Dragon

A creature from the mythology of Europe and Asia in the form of a huge winged lizard-like creature. 

Dragon (Greek: δράκων) — a collective name that unites a number of mythical creatures that appear in the myths and folklore of many peoples of the world. 

 

European Dragon

European dragons from Catalonia are depicted as snake-like creatures with two or four paws. Their breath is poisonous, and touching can kill by decomposition and rotting. According to French legend, dragons are also referred to as dragoons. In the Italian legend, or rather in the Sardinian myth, a dragon named skultoun is mentioned, capable of killing people with one glance, as they say, he was immortal and lived in undeveloped areas of the country. Dragon-like wyverns with two legs have been mentioned and used as symbols in English culture since medieval times.

Eastern Dragon

Chinese dragons are more serpentine than European ones, and are usually depicted as benevolent creatures. Although there are exceptions. Such dragons are also depicted in various shapes, colors and sizes. Japanese dragons are very similar to Chinese, but they have three claws instead of four. As a rule, they are depicted as benevolent, having a golden color.

Norse mythology

In Scandinavian mythology, lindworms are mentioned, usually having two paws. The World Serpent Jormungand is depicted as a giant snake with signs of a dragon. The poem The Divination of the Velva tells about a dragon called Nidhegg. The Edda describes the dragon Fafnir, who was also a lindworm. Vikings at one time loved to decorate their ships with dragon heads, thereby intimidating their opponents.

Greek mythology

In Homer's Iliad, King Agamemnon has a symbol on his chest in the form of a blue three-headed dragon.

Egyptian mythology

Apep, also known as Apophis, was a divine serpent or giant snake in Egyptian mythology. Apophis was supposedly the mortal enemy of Ra, the sun god.

Slavic mythology

In Slavic mythology, the dense dragon is associated with a snake. Russian dragons are usually depicted with three heads. According to some legends, if such a dragon's head is cut off, it will grow back. In Russia and Ukraine, the most famous likeness of a dragon is the Gorynych Serpent, which has symbolic three heads and spits fire.

Other Russian dragons (such as Tugarin) have Turkic names, probably symbolizing Mongols and other nomadic peoples. The coat of arms of Moscow also depicts St. George (symbolizing Christianity), who kills a dragon (symbolizing Satan).

Indonesian-Malay mythology

In Indonesian and Malay cultures, dragons are referred to as Naga or Nogo, and are often depicted as giant snake-like creatures. Indian and Indonesian dragons (Naga) are considered divine and benevolent.

Hindu mythology

In Hindu mythology, draconian snakes, known as Nagas, occupy a prominent place and are usually equated with cobras. They tend to be neutral creatures, but are more often portrayed as benevolent rather than malevolent.

Vietnamese mythology

Vietnamese dragons are symbolic and very important creatures in the folklore and mythology of Vietnam. According to the mythology of creation, humans descended from dragons and faeries. The Vietnamese believe that dragons cause rain, which is very important for agriculture.

The term "dragon" has also come to be applied to mythical Asian dragon-like creatures, such as Japanese ryu (竜), Chinese lun (龍), Vietnamese long (龍), Korean yong (용) and others.

The earliest attested reports of dragon-like creatures tell of some giant snakes. Dragons were first described in the mythology of the ancient Near East, as well as in the art and literature of ancient Mesopotamia.

Often it flies, less often it glows or spews fire. For many peoples, his appearance in the sky foreshadowed misfortune.

It is often mentioned that dragons have an insatiable appetite, they live in caves where they hoard and guard treasures.

Dragoon flying creature generating a fire creature scales the glowing areas of the body wings

Dragoon

A creature from the mythology of Europe and Asia in the form of a huge winged lizard-like creature. 

Dragon (Greek: δράκων) — a collective name that unites a number of mythical creatures that appear in the myths and folklore of many peoples of the world. 

 

European Dragon

European dragons from Catalonia are depicted as snake-like creatures with two or four paws. Their breath is poisonous, and touching can kill by decomposition and rotting. According to French legend, dragons are also referred to as dragoons. In the Italian legend, or rather in the Sardinian myth, a dragon named skultoun is mentioned, capable of killing people with one glance, as they say, he was immortal and lived in undeveloped areas of the country. Dragon-like wyverns with two legs have been mentioned and used as symbols in English culture since medieval times.

Eastern Dragon

Chinese dragons are more serpentine than European ones, and are usually depicted as benevolent creatures. Although there are exceptions. Such dragons are also depicted in various shapes, colors and sizes. Japanese dragons are very similar to Chinese, but they have three claws instead of four. As a rule, they are depicted as benevolent, having a golden color.

Norse mythology

In Scandinavian mythology, lindworms are mentioned, usually having two paws. The World Serpent Jormungand is depicted as a giant snake with signs of a dragon. The poem The Divination of the Velva tells about a dragon called Nidhegg. The Edda describes the dragon Fafnir, who was also a lindworm. Vikings at one time loved to decorate their ships with dragon heads, thereby intimidating their opponents.

Greek mythology

In Homer's Iliad, King Agamemnon has a symbol on his chest in the form of a blue three-headed dragon.

Egyptian mythology

Apep, also known as Apophis, was a divine serpent or giant snake in Egyptian mythology. Apophis was supposedly the mortal enemy of Ra, the sun god.

Slavic mythology

In Slavic mythology, the dense dragon is associated with a snake. Russian dragons are usually depicted with three heads. According to some legends, if such a dragon's head is cut off, it will grow back. In Russia and Ukraine, the most famous likeness of a dragon is the Gorynych Serpent, which has symbolic three heads and spits fire.

Other Russian dragons (such as Tugarin) have Turkic names, probably symbolizing Mongols and other nomadic peoples. The coat of arms of Moscow also depicts St. George (symbolizing Christianity), who kills a dragon (symbolizing Satan).

Indonesian-Malay mythology

In Indonesian and Malay cultures, dragons are referred to as Naga or Nogo, and are often depicted as giant snake-like creatures. Indian and Indonesian dragons (Naga) are considered divine and benevolent.

Hindu mythology

In Hindu mythology, draconian snakes, known as Nagas, occupy a prominent place and are usually equated with cobras. They tend to be neutral creatures, but are more often portrayed as benevolent rather than malevolent.

Vietnamese mythology

Vietnamese dragons are symbolic and very important creatures in the folklore and mythology of Vietnam. According to the mythology of creation, humans descended from dragons and faeries. The Vietnamese believe that dragons cause rain, which is very important for agriculture.

The term "dragon" has also come to be applied to mythical Asian dragon-like creatures, such as Japanese ryu (竜), Chinese lun (龍), Vietnamese long (龍), Korean yong (용) and others.

The earliest attested reports of dragon-like creatures tell of some giant snakes. Dragons were first described in the mythology of the ancient Near East, as well as in the art and literature of ancient Mesopotamia.

Often it flies, less often it glows or spews fire. For many peoples, his appearance in the sky foreshadowed misfortune.

It is often mentioned that dragons have an insatiable appetite, they live in caves where they hoard and guard treasures.

Draug anthropomorphic creature living dead

Draug

In Scandinavian mythology, a revived dead man who returned to the world of the living by his own will after a violent death or at the call of a strong sorcerer. 

The appearance depends on the type of death: water constantly flows from the drowned man, and bleeding wounds gape on the body of the fallen fighter. The skin color can vary from dead white to cadaverous blue. His body can swell to a huge size, which makes him much heavier and more sedentary.

Sometimes they remain undisturbed for many years. Sometimes the soul is preserved.

Draugs are often referred to as guardians of the treasures of burial mounds. At the same time, there are legends about draugs leaving their tombs at night to jump and jump on the roofs of houses, inspiring terror in people.

Draugs are credited with supernatural power and magical abilities: to predict the future, weather. Anyone who knows a special spell can subdue them.

It is also mentioned in the sagas that they are able to transform into various animals, but at the same time they still have human eyes and a mind that they had in "human" form. Sometimes they can pass through the ground.

Draugs can attack animals and travelers staying overnight in a stable, but they can also attack a dwelling. In connection with this belief, a custom arose in Iceland to knock three times at night (it was believed that the ghost was limited to one).

Draugr anthropomorphic creature living dead

Draugr

In Scandinavian mythology, a revived dead man who returned to the world of the living by his own will after a violent death or at the call of a strong sorcerer. 

The appearance depends on the type of death: water constantly flows from the drowned man, and bleeding wounds gape on the body of the fallen fighter. The skin color can vary from dead white to cadaverous blue. His body can swell to a huge size, which makes him much heavier and more sedentary.

Sometimes they remain undisturbed for many years. Sometimes the soul is preserved.

Draugs are often referred to as guardians of the treasures of burial mounds. At the same time, there are legends about draugs leaving their tombs at night to jump and jump on the roofs of houses, inspiring terror in people.

Draugs are credited with supernatural power and magical abilities: to predict the future, weather. Anyone who knows a special spell can subdue them.

It is also mentioned in the sagas that they are able to transform into various animals, but at the same time they still have human eyes and a mind that they had in "human" form. Sometimes they can pass through the ground.

Draugs can attack animals and travelers staying overnight in a stable, but they can also attack a dwelling. In connection with this belief, a custom arose in Iceland to knock three times at night (it was believed that the ghost was limited to one).

Drekavac anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood restless spirit the harbinger of death turns into an animal

Drekavac

A creature from the folklore of the Southern Slavs. It is believed that this is the soul of a dead unbaptized baby.

It has a very thin and elongated spindle-shaped body with a disproportionately large head, but it can look like an animal (foreshadows the death of a pet) or a child (foreshadows the death of a person).

It can bleat a kid, cry a baby, meow, scream like a bird. Usually appears in cemeteries, along roads or right in the village. Considered a vampire. Sometimes it is believed that he attacks livestock.

Drekavak anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood restless spirit the harbinger of death turns into an animal

Drekavak

A creature from the folklore of the Southern Slavs. It is believed that this is the soul of a dead unbaptized baby.

It has a very thin and elongated spindle-shaped body with a disproportionately large head, but it can look like an animal (foreshadows the death of a pet) or a child (foreshadows the death of a person).

It can bleat a kid, cry a baby, meow, scream like a bird. Usually appears in cemeteries, along roads or right in the village. Considered a vampire. Sometimes it is believed that he attacks livestock.

Drek anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood restless spirit the harbinger of death turns into an animal

Drek

A creature from the folklore of the Southern Slavs. It is believed that this is the soul of a dead unbaptized baby.

It has a very thin and elongated spindle-shaped body with a disproportionately large head, but it can look like an animal (foreshadows the death of a pet) or a child (foreshadows the death of a person).

It can bleat a kid, cry a baby, meow, scream like a bird. Usually appears in cemeteries, along roads or right in the village. Considered a vampire. Sometimes it is believed that he attacks livestock.

Drekalo anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood restless spirit the harbinger of death turns into an animal

Drekalo

A creature from the folklore of the Southern Slavs. It is believed that this is the soul of a dead unbaptized baby.

It has a very thin and elongated spindle-shaped body with a disproportionately large head, but it can look like an animal (foreshadows the death of a pet) or a child (foreshadows the death of a person).

It can bleat a kid, cry a baby, meow, scream like a bird. Usually appears in cemeteries, along roads or right in the village. Considered a vampire. Sometimes it is believed that he attacks livestock.

Dsonokva anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts high being specifies the location of the treasure unusual sounds

Dsonokva

In the myths of the Indians of North America, ogres are ogres with copper claws, long hanging breasts and black skin. He whistles to lure people to him.

If you burn dsonokva, mosquitoes will be born from its ashes. If you take a giantess by surprise, she can share some of her wealth with a person.

Dzonokva anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts high being specifies the location of the treasure unusual sounds

Dzonokva

In the myths of the Indians of North America, ogres are ogres with copper claws, long hanging breasts and black skin. He whistles to lure people to him.

If you burn dsonokva, mosquitoes will be born from its ashes. If you take a giantess by surprise, she can share some of her wealth with a person.

Dunya-mara water creature

Dunya-mara

The sea man from the folklore of the Isle of Man. It is considered much less ferocious than the usual English Merrow, and almost as gentle and friendly as the Irish Merrow.

Dinny-Mara water creature

Dinny-Mara

The sea man from the folklore of the Isle of Man. It is considered much less ferocious than the usual English Merrow, and almost as gentle and friendly as the Irish Merrow.

Duinny Murray water creature

Duinny Murray

The sea man from the folklore of the Isle of Man. It is considered much less ferocious than the usual English Merrow, and almost as gentle and friendly as the Irish Merrow.

Duppy anthropomorphic creature the bare bones of the skeleton translucent turns into a human turns into an animal

Duppy

In Caribbean folklore, it is the spirit of a dead man, capable of taking the form of animals (in particular a three-legged horse) or people (for example, "Susan-with-long-tits" (Long-Bubby Susan), which she throws over her shoulder). He moves backwards. If he has not taken someone's form, then he looks like a haze or a ghost, or even a white translucent skeleton. 

No one can take a picture or record dappy on video. 

Dyutpa water creature

Dyutpa

In Altai mythology, fantastic monsters are dragons that live near the reservoirs of the underworld. They go back to the image of a fantastic dragon. They are hostile to people, which does not prevent them from being guides of shamans during trips to the underworld.

Dzashiki-varasi anthropomorphic creature fire with no apparent source fluid with no apparent source helps sounds without visible sources spontaneously moving objects

Dzashiki-varasi

A house spirit from Japanese folklore.  By nature and appearance, he is a child of 5-6 years old. He can turn over pillows or cause sounds similar to music heard from rooms that no one uses, etc. Sometimes he leaves small footprints in the ashes.

According to beliefs, this spirit can be found in large old houses that are maintained in good condition. Residents of the house in which dzashiki-varasi lives are lucky, but if the spirit leaves the house for some reason, then it will soon fall into decay. To attract and retain a dzashiki-varasi in the house, you need to appreciate and take care of him, but too much attention can scare him away.

Dzorigami animated object

Dzorigami

In Japanese folklore, the kind of creatures that an old clock turns into.

Direach of Glen Itiva disproportionate body high being the unusual shape of the eyes

Direach of Glen Itiva

In Scottish and Irish mythology, a monstrous giant with one eye, one leg and one arm growing from the middle of his chest.

Dwarf anthropomorphic creature hurting people pass the device or knowledge the little creature

Dwarf

According to the mythological dictionary, dwarves in the lower mythology of the peoples of Europe are called small anthropomorphic creatures that live most often in the mountains (less often-underground or in the forest, and sometimes it is believed that their homes are hidden in a parallel world connected with ours). The origin of this word is disputed: it is taken from the Latin language from "gēnomos" – "underground dweller", or from the ancient Greek "ΓνώΣη" - knowledge.

Gnomes were popularized (according to another version – invented) by the alchemist Paracelsus in the XVI century, although they were found much earlier in the folklore of European peoples. Paracelsus describes the dwarves as being two spans tall (about 40 cm), extremely reluctant to make contact with people and able to move through the earth's firmament with the same ease as people move in space.

Ideas about such creatures exist in many cultures, but not in all languages they have the name "gnome". For example, the Germans call them "zwerg" ("zwerg"), the British - "dwarf" ("dwarf" in the sense of "dwarf"). From the Old Norse "dvergr" came the old High German "twerg". According to Vladimir Orel, both of these names are derived from the Proto-Germanic "đwerȝaz". In French, dwarves are called "nain", in Italy - "nano", both words from the Greek "vᾶνος" — "tiny". Other European languages have their own words that are not related to any of these roots – Polish "krasnolud", Finnish" kääpiö", Czech" trpaslík " and others. Philological studies also indicate that in the Russian literature of the early XIX century, along with the" gnome", the variant"Karl" was often found.

According to ancient legends, dwarves were originally lower magical creatures, but they were not physically small in stature. The idea of dwarves as creatures of small stature appeared after the spread of Christianity.

The first literary sources where dwarves are mentioned were the Icelandic heroic songs of the 13th century from the collection "The Elder Edda", as well as the text of the “Younger Edda”, compiled by the skald poet Snorri Sturluson, who lived at the turn of the 12th and 13th centuries. Both literary works contain mythological tales of the 8th-10th centuries, as well as elements of the German heroic epic of the early 13th century.

Dwarves are usually considered spirits of the earth and mountains, guarding underground treasures. In alchemy and occultism, they are considered the spirits of the earth as the primary element, and, accordingly, the elementals of the earth. Because of these beliefs, dwarves are often given various supernatural powers, including supernatural skill and wealth.

They describe dwarves in different ways. Their height varies from the size of a finger to the height of a small child. Male dwarves usually wear long beards, and are sometimes endowed with goat legs or crow's feet. Men, dwarves are not very beauty, unlike the dwarf women (called "gnomey").

Description of gnomes in the Book of Fictional Creatures by Jorge Luis Borges:

"Popular imagination imagines them as bearded dwarfs with coarse and comical features; they are dressed in narrow brown caftans and monastic hoods."

According to ancient legends, dwarves, like fairies, love to tease people, but at the same time do them more good than evil. They can present some magical artifact, indicate the place where the treasure is hidden, or fulfill some small request or errand.

In modern culture, dwarves are remembered and loved. They are found in large numbers in fantasy stories of literature, movies, and computer games, and on the lawns of Europeans and Americans you can find figures of garden gnomes installed there as guardians of the earth. At the same time, pop culture has gone far from the original ideas about dwarves and is based rather on the images described in famous science fiction works (which, for example, often contain jokes about female dwarves, giving them a beard, mustache, or simply indistinguishable from the male body structure). These gnomes do not differ much in their behavior from fairies, brownies and other mystical creatures. They are rarely distinguished by any characteristic features other than their height or a caricatured "dwarf" appearance, reminiscent of the aforementioned garden figurine.

Due to the fact that dwarves are seen primarily as the characters of fairy tales along with the fairies (which, however, does not prevent adults, and periodically to meet and even photographed last), witnesses of the dwarves quite a bit, and Yes, those are rarely taken seriously (unlike the witnesses, for example, ghosts or aliens).

Darashi restless spirit the harbinger of death

Darashi

Spirits from Japanese folklore. "Hidarugami" (Hidarugami) roughly translates as "hungry gods". Depending on the region, hidarugami can be called with the words "hidarutami" or "darashi" or "daru", but their behavior is the same.

It is believed that these are the souls of those who died of starvation, lost in the mountains, and whose bodies were never found. They wander in search of someone with whom they can share their agony of eternal hunger.

They attack travelers walking along lonely mountain paths. The victims are suddenly overcome by an insatiable feeling of hunger, the like of which they have never experienced. This feeling is almost irresistible and is often accompanied by inexplicable fatigue and numbness of the limbs, as a result of which the victims of the attack of the "hungry ghost" fall to the ground, not understanding what is happening. If the traveler is not helped in time, it will almost certainly lead to his death or a state of complete insanity, and after his death the traveler will become the same hungry ghost.

Daru restless spirit the harbinger of death

Daru

Spirits from Japanese folklore. "Hidarugami" (Hidarugami) roughly translates as "hungry gods". Depending on the region, hidarugami can be called with the words "hidarutami" or "darashi" or "daru", but their behavior is the same.

It is believed that these are the souls of those who died of starvation, lost in the mountains, and whose bodies were never found. They wander in search of someone with whom they can share their agony of eternal hunger.

They attack travelers walking along lonely mountain paths. The victims are suddenly overcome by an insatiable feeling of hunger, the like of which they have never experienced. This feeling is almost irresistible and is often accompanied by inexplicable fatigue and numbness of the limbs, as a result of which the victims of the attack of the "hungry ghost" fall to the ground, not understanding what is happening. If the traveler is not helped in time, it will almost certainly lead to his death or a state of complete insanity, and after his death the traveler will become the same hungry ghost.

Dzesenbi a small light at the earth's surface restless spirit

Dzesenbi

In Yomihon there was a man who made himself a capital from the sale of Josen (sweets made from boiled juice Rehmannia Glutinosa) who was killed by a robber. It is said that the seller became the atmospheric ghost fire of Dzesenbi (, lit. "Fire Dzesen"), floating on rainy nights.

Dirg-do anthropomorphic creature it feeds on life energy sexual relations with the victim

Dirg-do

The name comes from Gaelic words meaning lover, mistress or concubine and a term for a burial mound or burial ground. According to another variant, liaian shi can be translated as fairy lover or fairy mistress.

Dirg-do can be translated as "sucking red blood".

Creatures from folklore Ireland and the Isle of Man, which are found mainly in wells and springs. 

Usually she appears to some man in the image of a written beauty, invisible to everyone else. That's just not so sweet and friendly this golden-haired girl in a green dress when she lures lonely travelers to her voice. She bites through the neck of the poor devils who are tired of singing and drinks all the blood, killing her victim. 

Like other vampires, only garlic and silver are saved from her.

Diablillo anthropomorphic creature helps the little creature

Diablillo

In Spanish folklore, horned dwarfs in red hats and red trousers. They help with homework. In different parts of Spain, these creatures are known by different names: diablillo in Galicia, maridillo and maneiro in Catalonia (Catalan maneiro, however, look like big black beetles), pauto in Asturias, menge in Cantabria, carmeno in Andalusia.

Dwarfs of Menehune afraid of sunlight anthropomorphic creature out of the landed object pass the device or knowledge the little creature

Dwarfs of Menehune

The Menehuns (Manehune, Menehune) are a mysterious highly developed people who, according to Polynesian myths, descended from the sky on the "large 3-tiered island of Kuaihelani". ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​​‌‌​‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​‌ ​​‌​​‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​​‌‌​ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

In the mythology of the Polynesians, these are dwarfs - the masters of the forests. They live in caves and sometimes shoot people with their bows.

Legend has it that Menehune appears only at night to build masterpieces (they are excellent craftsmen and most of the great buildings of the island are considered to be from work). But if they fail to complete their work overnight, they will leave it unoccupied. No one except their children and the people associated with them can see Menehune.

It is considered that outwardly they are ugly creatures whose height ranges from 12 to 90 centimeters, which only vaguely resemble people. Menehun's gaze is focused and motionless. He usually terrifies others. At the same time, the creatures are friendly and often help people. Menehune appear at sunset: they do not like sunlight because they turn into stone under its influence.

 ​​‌​​‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​​‌‌​ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Divya 's wives anthropomorphic creature high being hurting people

Divya 's wives

The Carpathian variety of forest creatures. They live in caves, and at night they run among the mountains, across fields and forests to tickle a random traveler to death.

They are tall, pale, with long hair, completely naked, except for a belt of grass. According to some reports, in addition to long hair, they have wings, and also clothes in the form of long magical dresses or bedspreads, under which they hide legs with hooves.

Dzivozheny anthropomorphic creature high being hurting people

Dzivozheny

The Carpathian variety of forest creatures. They live in caves, and at night they run among the mountains, across fields and forests to tickle a random traveler to death.

They are tall, pale, with long hair, completely naked, except for a belt of grass. According to some reports, in addition to long hair, they have wings, and also clothes in the form of long magical dresses or bedspreads, under which they hide legs with hooves.

Divite wives anthropomorphic creature high being hurting people

Divite wives

The Carpathian variety of forest creatures. They live in caves, and at night they run among the mountains, across fields and forests to tickle a random traveler to death.

They are tall, pale, with long hair, completely naked, except for a belt of grass. According to some reports, in addition to long hair, they have wings, and also clothes in the form of long magical dresses or bedspreads, under which they hide legs with hooves.

Divas anthropomorphic creature high being hurting people

Divas

The Carpathian variety of forest creatures. They live in caves, and at night they run among the mountains, across fields and forests to tickle a random traveler to death.

They are tall, pale, with long hair, completely naked, except for a belt of grass. According to some reports, in addition to long hair, they have wings, and also clothes in the form of long magical dresses or bedspreads, under which they hide legs with hooves.

Dwarf creature flying creature wings

Dwarf creature

A creature from the folklore of the North American Indians of the Illinoisans. Initially, this rather peaceful bird-like creature appeared once a year on the first day of autumn at sunset. On this day, she flew over the river in search of a winter home. All this went on until she tasted human flesh. Since then, she has been attacking people.

Defense fastest thing flying creature hurting people sounds without visible sources the transition to another world turns into a human

Defense

The Moonshiner-defender is the guardian spirit of the blooming rye field of their mythology of the Komi peoples, an analogue of the Russian noon.

She was mostly represented as a young woman in green clothes and a scarf, in straw bast shoes, with blue eyes like cornflowers, but he could also be in a male guise (called "half aka").

This field spirit, but under the name "defender" or "moonshiner-defender", had an anthropozoomorphic appearance: a woman with spreading horns on her head. She lived in a field, slept in rye at night and, in addition to protecting crops, was engaged in searching for wooden harrows left by negligent owners right in the field. Having found a harrow, the "defender" put it on the horns and, stepping carefully so as not to damage the rye, took it out to the boundary.

If the "defense" was shown to a person, it was considered a favorable sign promising a good harvest.

Dzedka a small light at the earth's surface glowing eyes specifies the location of the treasure turns into an animal

Dzedka

There are "pure", that is, not sworn treasures, they can be taken by anyone without harm to themselves. But most of the treasures are "unclean", cursed and are under the protection of evil spirits. 

In Slavic folklore, there is a spirit guarding treasures. It has different names for different peoples. Russians have a kladenets, a storekeeper, a layun, a tickler, a kopsha, a storeroom demon; Ukrainians have a skarbnik, in Polish it is called skarbnik, bazyliszek, Belarusians call this creature a dziedka, Czechs a cervený mužik, in Bulgaria - stopan, saibia.

It was believed that people did not see him, but only noticed his eyes red as lights. Therefore, if anyone notices the red lights, he can safely go to them, since there is a treasure buried there or there is a bag with money.

You need to throw a hat or a bunch of hair at the light, then the treasure will be at the very surface of the earth. If you throw shoes or bast shoes, then the treasure will sink so deep into the ground that you will have to dig it up all your life.

He is often seen by a person in the form of a magpie. If his treasure is stolen, it turns into a dog and pursues the kidnapper.

Dracus anthropomorphic creature choking victim hurting people restless spirit turns into an animal

Dracus

In Bulgarian mythology, an eternally living male or female werewolf. They become immured after death (so that the structure does not collapse and stood for centuries in the foundation, it was customary to immure a living person). His restless spirit becomes the guardian of this structure. Day and night he guards the structure, and at night he calls travelers. But this call cannot be answered. Turning into a dog, a cat, a wolf, any other animal, he attacks people on dark nights and strangles them.

Demon?Tarask fastest thing flying creature hurting people sounds without visible sources the transition to another world turns into a human

Demon?Tarask

In Russian, there are variants of "Tarask" and "Taraska" (the French name La Tarasque is feminine). In some sources, he is found under the names "Leviathan's son" or "Son of Leviathan" (the Bible describes Satan, among other things, also in the form of Leviathan, as a huge sea creature or a flying dragon), because in religious art and legends, dragons always stand for Satan or demons in general. Because of what this creature is sometimes called a "Demon Tarask".

This is a dragon that, according to medieval legends, lived in the south-east of France in the Provence region and terrorized the small village of Nerluk on the banks of the Rhone River.

The Legend of the Dragon that was Tamed Saint Martha (Martha), began to spread in Provence in the XII century and was associated with the appearance here in 1187 of sacred relics associated with St. Martha and the consecration in Tarascon in 1197 of a church dedicated to the saint.

It was a massive, broad-chested, high-withered half-beast, half-fish, standing on six powerful paws, a mountain of muscles covered with a scaly shell. Another version of the life of Saint Martha contains a more detailed description of the monster: it had two pairs of horns; a mane like a horse; a hunchbacked back covered with hard diamond-shaped scales; thick legs like a pig with claws like a bear, and a snake tail with two spikes.

This monster set fire to houses and crops with the fire it exhaled, and also arranged a flood, stirring up the waters of the Rhone River with its tail. Hiding in the water, he killed all passers-by and drowned ships.

Once in the harbor A ship entered Saint-Marie-de-la-Mer, from which a maiden in white clothes came ashore. It was Saint Martha. The peasants turned to her, and the saint agreed to help. Arriving on the banks of the Rhone, Martha sat on a rock and sang (in another version, she pacified him with holy water and the sign of the cross). Hearing the beautiful melody, the dragon, who loved music, swam ashore, lay down at the girl's feet and fell asleep. Then Martha put a collar on Tarask and brought the tamed dragon to the village.

‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌This legend gave rise to celebrations created by the king Rene the Good in 1469, and on April 14, 1474, the knightly Order of Tarasca was established, one of the duties of which was the custom that has survived to this day, to drag an effigy of Tarasca on a chain around the city every year.

Interestingly, according to legend, the locals found out that if Tarask eats eight people in one sitting, then during the next six months he is completely safe, so it is customary to dress up eight people at the same time in the costume of a huge monster to this day.

Dead people anthropomorphic creature hurting people living dead restless spirit

Dead people

Mortgaged dead or other names: rus. unclean dead, dead, navi, nav; belor. nyabozhchyki, naytsy, nayki; ukr. mavki, nyavki; bolg. navye, navlyantsi, navoi, navyatsi; v.-Serb. navje; slovene. navje, mavje; Polish. nawie.

In the mythology of the Slavs, these are people who died an unnatural death and did not receive comfort after death. It was believed that they return to the world of the living and continue their existence on earth as mythical creatures (evil spirits). They could send disease, famine, pestilence, drought.

Usually they became violent deaths, suicides, drunken deaths, drowned people, unbaptized children, sorcerers and witches.

The term "mortgaged dead" was introduced into scientific circulation at the beginning of the XX century by an ethnographer Dmitry Zelenin, since the "unclean" dead did not have a single name for all Slavic traditions

Dragon with a candle animal body parts generating a fire creature

Dragon with a candle

In ancient Chinese mythology, a dragon with a human face. It is believed that he holds a fire in his mouth, with which he illuminates the heavenly gates.

E

Eater of the Dead animal body parts

Eater of the Dead

In Egyptian mythology, a monster that devours the souls of sinners, according to one version, has the body of a dog and the head of a crocodile, according to another, it is a monster with the body of a hippopotamus, lion paws and mane, the mouth of a crocodile. It lives in the Duat.

She ate a person's heart if great The Ennead pronounced a guilty verdict on him at the afterlife court Osiris in Amenti. In the tombs of the pharaohs, Ammat was depicted not as a monster, but as a protector.

Egi-baba anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body excessive thinness helps you find your way hurting people pass the device or knowledge the bare bones of the skeleton the transition to another world

Egi-baba

A character of Slavic mythology. It is called: rus. Baba-yaga, Yaga, yaga-baba, egi-baba, yagaya, Yagishna, Yagabova, Egiboba; belor. Baba Yaga, Baba Yuga, Yaginya; bolg. Baba Yaga; Ukrainian Baba-Yazia, Yazia, Yazi-baba, Gadra; Polish. jędza, babojędza; czech. jezinka, Ježibaba "witch", "forest woman"; v.-Serb. baba jega; slovene. jaga baba, ježi baba.

Historian Petrukhin V.Ya. brings the Proto-Slavic yaga (*yga) closer to the designation of snakes, reptiles, which, in his opinion, indicates the chthonic origins of the image.

In Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga has several stable attributes: she can conjure, fly in a mortar, lives on the border of the forest in a hut on chicken legs (or propped up with pancakes), surrounded by a fence of human bones with skulls. She lures people to her. She pursues her victims in a mortar, driving her with a pestle and covering the trail with a broom (broom).

In the former Slavic lands Carinthia in Austria "Baba Yaga Pehtra" (German. Pechtrababajagen) is a ceremonial ritual character.

In fairy tales , she acts in three incarnations:

  • Yaga-bogatyrsha has a kladentsom sword and fights on equal terms with the bogatyrs.
  • Yaga the kidnapper steals children.
  • Yaga, the giver, greets the hero or heroine affably, treats her deliciously, soars in the bathhouse, gives useful advice, presents rich and wonderful gifts.

The appearance (bone leg, iron teeth, long gray hair, sagging breasts, the ability to smell someone else's, etc.) indicates a connection with demonic characters of another world, the dead (a hut as a domovina-coffin); attributes, occupations and supernatural abilities — a mortar and a pest, an oven (where she roasts the abducted) spinning, flying through the air in a mortar, on a broomstick — also refer to female mythological characters, witches. The image of Baba Yaga is associated with legends about the hero's transition to the other world.

Egiboba anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body excessive thinness helps you find your way hurting people pass the device or knowledge the bare bones of the skeleton the transition to another world

Egiboba

A character of Slavic mythology. It is called: rus. Baba-yaga, Yaga, yaga-baba, egi-baba, yagaya, Yagishna, Yagabova, Egiboba; belor. Baba Yaga, Baba Yuga, Yaginya; bolg. Baba Yaga; Ukrainian Baba-Yazia, Yazia, Yazi-baba, Gadra; Polish. jędza, babojędza; czech. jezinka, Ježibaba "witch", "forest woman"; v.-Serb. baba jega; slovene. jaga baba, ježi baba.

Historian Petrukhin V.Ya. brings the Proto-Slavic yaga (*yga) closer to the designation of snakes, reptiles, which, in his opinion, indicates the chthonic origins of the image.

In Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga has several stable attributes: she can conjure, fly in a mortar, lives on the border of the forest in a hut on chicken legs (or propped up with pancakes), surrounded by a fence of human bones with skulls. She lures people to her. She pursues her victims in a mortar, driving her with a pestle and covering the trail with a broom (broom).

In the former Slavic lands Carinthia in Austria "Baba Yaga Pehtra" (German. Pechtrababajagen) is a ceremonial ritual character.

In fairy tales , she acts in three incarnations:

  • Yaga-bogatyrsha has a kladentsom sword and fights on equal terms with the bogatyrs.
  • Yaga the kidnapper steals children.
  • Yaga, the giver, greets the hero or heroine affably, treats her deliciously, soars in the bathhouse, gives useful advice, presents rich and wonderful gifts.

The appearance (bone leg, iron teeth, long gray hair, sagging breasts, the ability to smell someone else's, etc.) indicates a connection with demonic characters of another world, the dead (a hut as a domovina-coffin); attributes, occupations and supernatural abilities — a mortar and a pest, an oven (where she roasts the abducted) spinning, flying through the air in a mortar, on a broomstick — also refer to female mythological characters, witches. The image of Baba Yaga is associated with legends about the hero's transition to the other world.

Ekek anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood wings

Ekek

Creatures from Filipino folklore, described as winged people, or half-humans, half-birds. It is believed that it launches its proboscis into the uterus of a pregnant woman and sucks blood from an unborn child through it.

Ec ec anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood wings

Ec ec

Creatures from Filipino folklore, described as winged people, or half-humans, half-birds. It is believed that it launches its proboscis into the uterus of a pregnant woman and sucks blood from an unborn child through it.

El Cuco anthropomorphic creature hairy creature hurting people restless spirit the manipulation of the actions of the victim the unusual shape of the eyes

El Cuco

El Cuco (or Cucuy, Coca, Cook, Coco) is a mystical ghost monster that is mentioned in scary stories for children in many Latin American and Portuguese–speaking countries. In its cultural significance, it is similar to the American Boogeyman and Babai from Slavic folklore.

El Cuco has a gender, although it is impossible to distinguish him by the appearance of the monster. At the same time, the folklore names of creatures of different sexes are different: Kuko is a male monster, and Kuka is a female, .

The myth of El Cuco originated in the countries of Portugal and Spain. The Spanish word "coco" ("coco") comes from the Portuguese "coco" ("cotco") – the so-called ghost with a pumpkin instead of a head. The word "coco" is used colloquially to refer to a human head in Portuguese and Spanish. Also "coco" means "skull". The word "cocuruto" in Portuguese means "crown" (and also "top" if we are talking about a hill or mountain). From the Basque language, "gogo" translates as "spirit". In Spanish mythology, "Crouga" is the name of a little–known deity to whom gifts were presented.

In many Latin American countries, the monster is often called El Cucuy. In northern New Mexico and southern Colorado, where the Hispanic population predominates, the creature is called "Coco Man".

El Cuco kidnaps and devours children. He can swallow a child right away without leaving a trace, or maybe, being a ghost, he can inhabit him and take him away to no one knows where. The monster comes to the naughty children, climbs on the roof and watches them.

This creature is often compared to the devil, contrasting with the guardian angel. There is a version that initially El Cuco was the spirit of a deceased person.

There is no generally accepted description of El Cuco, because he is portrayed differently in different countries. All descriptions of the creature agree that it is very scary to look at. He is described as a shapeless figure or a hairy monster that hides in closets or under beds. In the Middle Ages, at festivals, the creature was depicted as a female dragon. In Brazilian folklore, the monster is depicted as a humanoid female alligator and is called a Cook.

In Portugal, El Cuco's head is traditionally depicted as a carved vegetable lantern made of pumpkin, with two eyes and a mouth and a candle inside. He is also represented as a warrior carrying his own severed head.

Interestingly, in 1498, the sailor Vasco da Gama named the fruit of the Polynesian palm "coco", recalling the mythical creature. The word "coconut" comes from here.

The image of this monster has been used many times in the culture of different countries, ranging from Francisco Goya's 1799 work entitled "The Arrival of El Cucuy", to Stephen King's modern novel "The Outsider" ("The Outsider", 2018).

Ellillons anthropomorphic creature helps the little creature

Ellillons

Tiny kind elves of Welsh folklore, helping with the housework.

Etlertlons anthropomorphic creature helps the little creature

Etlertlons

Tiny kind elves of Welsh folklore, helping with the housework.

Elves a small light at the earth's surface anthropomorphic creature flattened plants memory lapses the distortion of time the glowing areas of the body the little creature the manipulation of the thoughts of the victim the transition to another world

Elves

Magical folk from Germanic-Scandinavian and Celtic folklore. They are also known by the names alva (Scandinavian), sida (Ancient Irish). The word "elf" itself is associated by some researchers with the Roman root "alb" — "white", according to another version it came from the Welsh "ellyl" or the Irish "aillil" — "shining", going back to the Sumerian "ellu" ("shining"). According to the descriptions of elves and fairies differ little.

Being benevolent to people. Descriptions of elves in various mythologies vary, but, as a rule, they are beautiful, light (sometimes even glowing) creatures, spirits of the forest. Sometimes they kidnap people (or their belongings) by taking them to their country, where a person has lost track of vermin. Sometimes they dance in forests or meadows in the form of lights, leaving trampled areas.

Empusa anthropomorphic creature sexual relations with the victim the glowing areas of the body

Empusa

A creature from Greek folklore. This is an anthropomorphic inhabitant of the underworld who can change her appearance, but always has a bronze leg and a flaming face. Can have sexual relations with people.

Empusa anthropomorphic creature sexual relations with the victim the glowing areas of the body

Empusa

A creature from Greek folklore. This is an anthropomorphic inhabitant of the underworld who can change her appearance, but always has a bronze leg and a flaming face. Can have sexual relations with people.

Encantado sexual relations with the victim the manipulation of the thoughts of the victim turns into a human

Encantado

Pink dolphins are werewolves from Brazilian mythology, living in the waters of the Amazon. At night, they turn into handsome young guys dressed in bright suits of antique cut and large straw hats hiding the blowhole. They go to settlements in search of girls who are able to exert a hypnotic influence and engage in sexual relations.

Eratnik anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood fastest thing living dead superpowered creature

Eratnik

Russian graves In Belarusian and Russian mythology, a deceased sorcerer or witch doctor who gets up from the grave at midnight and walks around the neighborhood until the first cocks. Can develop a high speed. Has great power. Can attack people and drink blood.

Exekyu flying creature large creature wings

Exekyu

A character of Dolgan fairy tales and the heroic epic olongko. A giant eagle with a beak capable of breaking a human skull.

He is the king of all birds. One of the legends tells about the size of the bird, where it was carried on eight horses, and in which the Exekyu swallows three cows at a time. Sometimes this mythical bird is described as two-headed (or even eight-headed).

Exekyu is also able to transform into a human and in a similar guise act as a legendary hero-king, dressed in heavy armor and with wings on his back.

Exekyu flying creature large creature wings

Exekyu

A character of Dolgan fairy tales and the heroic epic olongko. A giant eagle with a beak capable of breaking a human skull.

He is the king of all birds. One of the legends tells about the size of the bird, where it was carried on eight horses, and in which the Exekyu swallows three cows at a time. Sometimes this mythical bird is described as two-headed (or even eight-headed).

Exekyu is also able to transform into a human and in a similar guise act as a legendary hero-king, dressed in heavy armor and with wings on his back.

Efrit anthropomorphic creature burn marks flying creature generating a fire creature large creature restless spirit superpowered creature the glowing areas of the body the manipulation of the thoughts of the victim thermal effects on the body

Efrit

In Muslim mythology, this is a kind of jinn or fire elemental, which is the soul of a person who died a violent death (every drop of blood of the murdered person arises according to an ifrit). The body of the ifrit is made of basalt, bronze and molten lava. His figure is huge, bursts with heat and glows with a dark orange light. He flies, generates fire, is able to fulfill desires and cause confusion.

Eternal Thurso water body

Eternal Thurso

Iku-Turso (Iku-Tursas, Meritursas, Tursas, Turisas) is a sea monster from Finnish mythology.

His appearance remains unclear, but he is described with several epithets:

  • partalainen (the one who lives on the edge, or alternatively, bearded)
  • Tuonen härkä (vol Tuoni, Death)
  • tuhatpää (thousand - headed )
  • tuhatsarvi (thousand-horned)

It was sometimes said that he lived in Pohjola, but this may be because Pohjola was often perceived as the home of all evil.

Etai animated object choking victim

Etai

Creatures from Japanese folklore that old kimono belts become. At night, these old belts come to life, open the screens and crawl around the house like huge snakes. They can attack people and strangle them in their sleep.

Enchanted Ship restless spirit water body

Enchanted Ship

Caleuche This is a mythical ghost ship from mythology and local folklore on the island of Chiloe, in Chile. This is one of the most important myths about the culture of Chile.

According to Chilean legend, it is a large ghost ship sailing the seas around Chiloe (a small island off the coast of Chile) at night. 

According to one version, the ship is endowed with magical power and has its own consciousness and mind. It became a place of permanent residence of the souls of all those who died at sea.

The ship looks like a beautiful and bright white sailboat with 3 masts of 5 sails each, always full of lights and with the sounds of a party on board, but quickly disappears again, leaving no traces of its presence.

Anyone who accidentally sees a "Kaleuche" floating out of the night fog is doomed to death or lifelong bodily suffering.

However, sometimes the creepy crew of the ship invites a random witness to come on board. If he was not afraid, then the ship plunges into the abyss and all the treasures of the underwater world are revealed to a person. The one who will be able to keep what he saw a secret from his neighbors and will not try to get treasures from the bottom on his own will become a brother for the Kaleuche team and will be able to join the merry company whenever he wants.

The ghost ship is also known for its ability to move underwater, as is another famous ghost ship, the Flying Dutchman.

There are different versions of the legend:

  • The popular version says that this ship collects the dead from the water and gives them a new life on board as crew members who will spend eternity at parties and celebrations.
  • Another version says that a mythical ship will also appear in the seas of Chiloe to enchant fishermen with wonderful music and thus attract them to turn them into slaves-crew members who will be cursed for all eternity, carrying one leg bent on their back.
  • There is also a widespread idea that this is a ship of the dead and slave sailors, there is a version that it will also be a magic ship on which the sorcerers of Chiloe arrange their parties and transport goods after this journey. sorcerers return from a journey they make every 3 months to improve their magical abilities. However, it is said that only sorcerers can approach it and use only the Chilote seahorse as a means of transportation, since by order of Millalobo (an analogue of the sea king in the mythology of Chile), other creatures are forbidden to board it or access the ship in other ways.
  • Another version is that the crew of the ghost ship enters into magical contracts with certain merchants, guaranteeing them prosperity in exchange for services such as using their houses for parties or other illegal or dark purposes. 

Because of this version of the legend, when a person in Chiloe quickly becomes rich, it is often attributed to his signing a contract with the team Kaleuche. 

Similar rumors spread after the 1960 Valdivia earthquake, because some houses were not affected by the fires that subsequently engulfed Chiloe. 

In the same decade, there were stories that the sounds of a ship dropping anchor could be heard around the homes of many successful traders of the Chiloe archipelago. Allegedly, these were the sounds of Kaleuchen, Imperceptibly delivering goods and treasures to those with whom the contract was concluded. However, most people rejected this supernatural explanation and instead placed the responsibility for the merchant's prosperity on mortals rather than supernatural smugglers.

En-kizhi helps

En-kizhi

A house spirit from the mythology of the Shors (a Turkic-speaking people living in the southeastern part of Western Siberia), helping with the household.

En anthropomorphic creature sexual relations with the victim turns into an animal

En

In the mythology of the West Siberian Tatars, a forest spirit that appears in the form of a person or various animals. He lives in abandoned hunting huts, loves horses, rides them, confuses his mane, smears it with resin. In the guise of a beautiful woman enters into a love affair with a man. 

Enperi anthropomorphic creature sexual relations with the victim turns into an animal

Enperi

In the mythology of the West Siberian Tatars, a forest spirit that appears in the form of a person or various animals. He lives in abandoned hunting huts, loves horses, rides them, confuses his mane, smears it with resin. In the guise of a beautiful woman enters into a love affair with a man. 

Elf a small light at the earth's surface afraid of sunlight anthropomorphic creature flattened plants flying creature geometrically regular or complex patterns large creature memory lapses the glowing areas of the body the little creature the transition to another world turns into an animal

Elf

Creatures from British mythology.

There are pixies, like mosquitoes (they look like moths shining with a bright yellow light) to a normal human. A typical pixie has red hair and a snub nose. He wears a green jacket, and on his head he wears a huge peaked cap that covers his narrowed eyes, afraid of sunlight.

They can lead you astray and make you wander. They steal horses and drive them through the fields at night until they are exhausted. After that, circles similar to witch rings remain in the fields. If a person steps into such a circle, he will get into a Magical land and stay in it for the rest of his days. However, if you step into the circle with one foot, nothing terrible will happen: a person will see dancing fairies, but they will not be able to hurt him or get him to themselves.

They can turn into hedgehogs.

Ears-they animal body parts water creature

Ears-they

In Japanese mythology, a kind of water demons-chimeras with a bull's head and spider legs. They exhale poison and love human flesh. Sometimes they work in pairs with other creatures, luring the victim.

F

Fasolemoyka sounds without visible sources

Fasolemoyka

Azuki-arai (あずきあらい - the spelling of the name Adzuki-arai in Japanese and Latin) or Fasolemoyka (小豆洗い - the original Japanese spelling of the name Adzuki-arai and its literal translation).

In Japanese folklore, a demon washing red beans in the river and thereby creating a characteristic rustling knock (the sound comes from the void and can be heard even at a dried-up reservoir).

The spirit can also be entertained also by singing the phrase: "azuki togou ka, hito totte kuou ka? Seki-seki!". ("Am I going to grind Adzuki, or take and devour a person's flesh? Seki-seki!")

According to legend, anyone who gets too close to the place where the song sounds will inevitably fall into the water.

Although adzuki-araya has rarely been seen, since, despite his terrible song, he is a timid and harmless creature, he is often described as a short man with a grotesque appearance: a large balding head, crooked teeth, thin mustache and large bulging yellow eyes. Sometimes it has the appearance of a child, an old man or an old woman of small stature. The spirit wears torn clothes and forever bends over his vessel in which he washes adzuki beans.

According to one version, it may be the restless spirit of the boy.

Forest woman anthropomorphic creature disproportionate body excessive thinness helps you find your way hurting people pass the device or knowledge the bare bones of the skeleton the transition to another world

Forest woman

A character of Slavic mythology. It is called: rus. Baba-yaga, Yaga, yaga-baba, egi-baba, yagaya, Yagishna, Yagabova, Egiboba; belor. Baba Yaga, Baba Yuga, Yaginya; bolg. Baba Yaga; Ukrainian Baba-Yazia, Yazia, Yazi-baba, Gadra; Polish. jędza, babojędza; czech. jezinka, Ježibaba "witch", "forest woman"; v.-Serb. baba jega; slovene. jaga baba, ježi baba.

Historian Petrukhin V.Ya. brings the Proto-Slavic yaga (*yga) closer to the designation of snakes, reptiles, which, in his opinion, indicates the chthonic origins of the image.

In Slavic folklore, Baba Yaga has several stable attributes: she can conjure, fly in a mortar, lives on the border of the forest in a hut on chicken legs (or propped up with pancakes), surrounded by a fence of human bones with skulls. She lures people to her. She pursues her victims in a mortar, driving her with a pestle and covering the trail with a broom (broom).

In the former Slavic lands Carinthia in Austria "Baba Yaga Pehtra" (German. Pechtrababajagen) is a ceremonial ritual character.

In fairy tales , she acts in three incarnations:

  • Yaga-bogatyrsha has a kladentsom sword and fights on equal terms with the bogatyrs.
  • Yaga the kidnapper steals children.
  • Yaga, the giver, greets the hero or heroine affably, treats her deliciously, soars in the bathhouse, gives useful advice, presents rich and wonderful gifts.

The appearance (bone leg, iron teeth, long gray hair, sagging breasts, the ability to smell someone else's, etc.) indicates a connection with demonic characters of another world, the dead (a hut as a domovina-coffin); attributes, occupations and supernatural abilities — a mortar and a pest, an oven (where she roasts the abducted) spinning, flying through the air in a mortar, on a broomstick — also refer to female mythological characters, witches. The image of Baba Yaga is associated with legends about the hero's transition to the other world.

Futo animal body parts water creature

Futo

A Chinese monster from the Catalog of Mountains and Seas, a ram with nine tails and four ears, as well as two eyes on its back.

The name of the creature differs in different editions of the book: in the first edition of 1965 — it is called Fato, in the second, 1987 — Futo.It is difficult to say whether Fato is the same Bochi, or they are different creatures, but the similarity of the texts is obvious.​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Fatou animal body parts water creature

Fatou

A Chinese monster from the Catalog of Mountains and Seas, a ram with nine tails and four ears, as well as two eyes on its back.

The name of the creature differs in different editions of the book: in the first edition of 1965 — it is called Fato, in the second, 1987 — Futo.It is difficult to say whether Fato is the same Bochi, or they are different creatures, but the similarity of the texts is obvious.​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

Fahan disproportionate body high being the unusual shape of the eyes

Fahan

In Scottish and Irish mythology, a monstrous giant with one eye, one leg and one arm growing from the middle of his chest.

Fahin disproportionate body high being the unusual shape of the eyes

Fahin

In Scottish and Irish mythology, a monstrous giant with one eye, one leg and one arm growing from the middle of his chest.

Fairy anthropomorphic creature flying creature hurting people makes you wander the distortion of time the little creature the transition to another world turns into an animal

Fairy

Fairy in Celtic and Germanic folklore is a mythological being of metaphysical nature, possessing inexplicable, supernatural abilities, leading a secretive lifestyle, but sometimes interfering in a person's daily life and often causing harm.

Fairies are also called wig (witch), peri, fairy, pixie, etc. It is believed that the word "fairy" was borrowed from the Old French "faerie", which covered everything that somehow related to the place of residence and activities of groups of mythological "little people" (faie; later fee). The source of the French term is the Latin fata, used in the feminine gender in the languages of the Romance group, which was derived from fatum ("predicted", "prophetic").

According to the encyclopedia of Celtic mythology, the folk ideas about fairies that existed among the Irish and Welsh were practically no different from each other. In both places, hills were considered to be the home of fairies, although in Wales the place of the "fairy hill" was often occupied by lakes. In both Ireland and Wales, fairies, although they fought and married each other, were considered semi-immortal. Both of them stole children from people, stealing them right out of the cradle, and their offspring, on the contrary, were thrown into the families of ordinary mortals. And there and there fairies could cast spells on men and women. Both the Irish and the Welsh fairies simply adored music and dancing, spending their lives in incredible luxury and splendor. Another significant feature of their similarity is their tiny stature, but this is probably nothing more than a consequence of the literary tradition, the beginning of which was laid by none other than Shakespeare. In authentic folklore legends, both Gaels and Britons have fairies at least as tall as a human.

In the second half of the XIX century, fairies acquired not only anthropomorphic features of appearance, but also wings. Also, various magical abilities began to be attributed to fairies - from turning themselves into animals to causing trouble and displaying remarkable strength.

Regarding the origin of fairies, there are significant discrepancies in the folklore of different peoples; at different times and in different localities they were considered the souls of the dead, demons, angels, beings of an intermediate or separate stage of evolution, aliens from other worlds, spirits of nature, etc. Fairies have tightly entered the culture of different peoples and are reflected in literature, music, films and games.

Now fairies are definitely described as kind little creatures, nature spirits with magical properties. These ideas have taken root in people thanks to the popularization of the image of fairies in fairy tales and cartoons. This image has become predominantly mythical. Various phenomena that used to be associated with fairies are now called "poltergeist" (throwing stones, blowing out candles, dropping utensils from shelves, letting smoke into the house), "aliens" (kidnapping a person and entering into an intimate relationship with him), "anomalous zone" (mortals entering the realm of fairies can to spend up to 900 years here, which seem to them only one night), etc. Thus, the original fairies and their tricks are in the past, they have been replaced by representatives of modern mythology. However, in Germany and the UK, you can still find people who have met fairies (and even photographed and videotaped). In addition, from time to time there is material evidence of the existence of fairies in the form of dead (often mummified) bodies, along with the corpses of chupacabras, mermaids and aliens.

Faeries anthropomorphic creature flying creature hurting people makes you wander the distortion of time the little creature the transition to another world turns into an animal

Faeries

Fairy in Celtic and Germanic folklore is a mythological being of metaphysical nature, possessing inexplicable, supernatural abilities, leading a secretive lifestyle, but sometimes interfering in a person's daily life and often causing harm.

Fairies are also called wig (witch), peri, fairy, pixie, etc. It is believed that the word "fairy" was borrowed from the Old French "faerie", which covered everything that somehow related to the place of residence and activities of groups of mythological "little people" (faie; later fee). The source of the French term is the Latin fata, used in the feminine gender in the languages of the Romance group, which was derived from fatum ("predicted", "prophetic").

According to the encyclopedia of Celtic mythology, the folk ideas about fairies that existed among the Irish and Welsh were practically no different from each other. In both places, hills were considered to be the home of fairies, although in Wales the place of the "fairy hill" was often occupied by lakes. In both Ireland and Wales, fairies, although they fought and married each other, were considered semi-immortal. Both of them stole children from people, stealing them right out of the cradle, and their offspring, on the contrary, were thrown into the families of ordinary mortals. And there and there fairies could cast spells on men and women. Both the Irish and the Welsh fairies simply adored music and dancing, spending their lives in incredible luxury and splendor. Another significant feature of their similarity is their tiny stature, but this is probably nothing more than a consequence of the literary tradition, the beginning of which was laid by none other than Shakespeare. In authentic folklore legends, both Gaels and Britons have fairies at least as tall as a human.

In the second half of the XIX century, fairies acquired not only anthropomorphic features of appearance, but also wings. Also, various magical abilities began to be attributed to fairies - from turning themselves into animals to causing trouble and displaying remarkable strength.

Regarding the origin of fairies, there are significant discrepancies in the folklore of different peoples; at different times and in different localities they were considered the souls of the dead, demons, angels, beings of an intermediate or separate stage of evolution, aliens from other worlds, spirits of nature, etc. Fairies have tightly entered the culture of different peoples and are reflected in literature, music, films and games.

Now fairies are definitely described as kind little creatures, nature spirits with magical properties. These ideas have taken root in people thanks to the popularization of the image of fairies in fairy tales and cartoons. This image has become predominantly mythical. Various phenomena that used to be associated with fairies are now called "poltergeist" (throwing stones, blowing out candles, dropping utensils from shelves, letting smoke into the house), "aliens" (kidnapping a person and entering into an intimate relationship with him), "anomalous zone" (mortals entering the realm of fairies can to spend up to 900 years here, which seem to them only one night), etc. Thus, the original fairies and their tricks are in the past, they have been replaced by representatives of modern mythology. However, in Germany and the UK, you can still find people who have met fairies (and even photographed and videotaped). In addition, from time to time there is material evidence of the existence of fairies in the form of dead (often mummified) bodies, along with the corpses of chupacabras, mermaids and aliens.

Fedal water creature

Fedal

Water Spirits The Highlands of Scotland. She lived in the Fedal Lake (Loch na Figel) in Harloch, and it was believed that she seduces men and drags them under the water.

Figel water creature

Figel

Water Spirits The Highlands of Scotland. She lived in the Fedal Lake (Loch na Figel) in Harloch, and it was believed that she seduces men and drags them under the water.

Ferriers anthropomorphic creature fire with no apparent source the little creature

Ferriers

A kind of fairy from Suffolk. They are small and very funny creatures. It was believed that the person who disturbed their peace, climbing the stairs on the same day in any of the houses on Tavern Street, noticed that large bright sparks were flying from under his soles. Sometimes they kidnapped children.

Feriers anthropomorphic creature fire with no apparent source the little creature

Feriers

A kind of fairy from Suffolk. They are small and very funny creatures. It was believed that the person who disturbed their peace, climbing the stairs on the same day in any of the houses on Tavern Street, noticed that large bright sparks were flying from under his soles. Sometimes they kidnapped children.

Ferishers anthropomorphic creature fire with no apparent source the little creature

Ferishers

A kind of fairy from Suffolk. They are small and very funny creatures. It was believed that the person who disturbed their peace, climbing the stairs on the same day in any of the houses on Tavern Street, noticed that large bright sparks were flying from under his soles. Sometimes they kidnapped children.

Field Worker animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fireball hairy creature high being hurting people long limbs makes you wander turns into a human turns into an animal

Field Worker

The spirit-owner of the field in the mythology of the Eastern Slavs was called a Field Man or Field (Belor. palyavik, Ukrainian polovik).

It is described mainly as a humanoid creature with individual animal, plant and demonic features, which is sometimes accompanied by a strong wind and sparks or lights. Usually this is a tall, long-legged man, overgrown with fiery-colored hair, with bulging eyes, horns, a long tail with a tassel at the end, a beard of ears.

Ukrainians also believed that he had ears like a calf, claws, large teeth and wings.

In the Novgorod province, they thought that Polevoy was dressed all in white, that he was gray-haired, and also in Ukraine they imagined that he was all white as snow, or that he was an old man with a white beard.

In Belarus, the field worker was depicted in long clothes, in bast shoes and with a cane in his hands.

In the Orel province, on the contrary, he was described as a naked, earth-black man with grass-like hair and multicolored eyes (the personification of the field).

In bylichki and byvalschiny, the field can take the form of both a young "hefty fellow" and a small ugly old man, can pretend to be an acquaintance or an animal (for example, a bull or a goat), can change its height depending on the surrounding vegetation.

It was generally believed that each field should have one and only fieldworm living in various terrain irregularities. The time of his activity is more often at noon or a sultry day. He protects the field, affects its fertility and the well-being of the cattle grazing on it.

The field is mostly hostile to a person: it can scare, knock off the road and even kill, as well as harm cattle and crops.

The images of the rarely mentioned lugovik, the land surveyor and his wife, the field hostess, are adjacent to the image of the field worker. The fieldworm has a lot in common with the noonday, the goblin and some other mythological characters.

Field animal body parts anthropomorphic creature fireball hairy creature high being hurting people long limbs makes you wander turns into a human turns into an animal

Field

The spirit-owner of the field in the mythology of the Eastern Slavs was called a Field Man or Field (Belor. palyavik, Ukrainian polovik).

It is described mainly as a humanoid creature with individual animal, plant and demonic features, which is sometimes accompanied by a strong wind and sparks or lights. Usually this is a tall, long-legged man, overgrown with fiery-colored hair, with bulging eyes, horns, a long tail with a tassel at the end, a beard of ears.

Ukrainians also believed that he had ears like a calf, claws, large teeth and wings.

In the Novgorod province, they thought that Polevoy was dressed all in white, that he was gray-haired, and also in Ukraine they imagined that he was all white as snow, or that he was an old man with a white beard.

In Belarus, the field worker was depicted in long clothes, in bast shoes and with a cane in his hands.

In the Orel province, on the contrary, he was described as a naked, earth-black man with grass-like hair and multicolored eyes (the personification of the field).

In bylichki and byvalschiny, the field can take the form of both a young "hefty fellow" and a small ugly old man, can pretend to be an acquaintance or an animal (for example, a bull or a goat), can change its height depending on the surrounding vegetation.

It was generally believed that each field should have one and only fieldworm living in various terrain irregularities. The time of his activity is more often at noon or a sultry day. He protects the field, affects its fertility and the well-being of the cattle grazing on it.

The field is mostly hostile to a person: it can scare, knock off the road and even kill, as well as harm cattle and crops.

The images of the rarely mentioned lugovik, the land surveyor and his wife, the field hostess, are adjacent to the image of the field worker. The fieldworm has a lot in common with the noonday, the goblin and some other mythological characters.

Finfolk anthropomorphic creature fastest thing helps to find the lost thing turns into an animal water creature

Finfolk

In the folklore of the Orkney and Shetland Islands, a race of amphibious people who kidnap people. They are equipped with fins that disguise themselves on the ground as human clothing. They move incredibly fast across the sea in their boats, in which the sails are never visible. They can turn into seals or fish, they know where to look for things lost by people.

Finman anthropomorphic creature fastest thing helps to find the lost thing turns into an animal water creature

Finman

In the folklore of the Orkney and Shetland Islands, a race of amphibious people who kidnap people. They are equipped with fins that disguise themselves on the ground as human clothing. They move incredibly fast across the sea in their boats, in which the sails are never visible. They can turn into seals or fish, they know where to look for things lost by people.

Finnfolk anthropomorphic creature fastest thing helps to find the lost thing turns into an animal water creature

Finnfolk

In the folklore of the Orkney and Shetland Islands, a race of amphibious people who kidnap people. They are equipped with fins that disguise themselves on the ground as human clothing. They move incredibly fast across the sea in their boats, in which the sails are never visible. They can turn into seals or fish, they know where to look for things lost by people.

Fishing changes form translucent turns into fog

Fishing

Lov or Lol is a soul in Komi mythology. The soul is located in the human head and is responsible for maintaining the vital principle in the body (responsible for breathing).

Unlike the ort, it leaves the body of its owner at the moment of death. It can be seen at this moment: it appears in the form of a butterfly or (mouse, bird, little man) and transforms into a cloud or steam.

Folletti anthropomorphic creature hooves hurting people sexual relations with the victim

Folletti

A short creature from Italian mythology. They are from one to three feet tall (0.3-0.9 m), with curly hair and bright eyes, usually wears red. Some of them have goat hooves, while others have no legs at all. They wear caps that give them the ability to become invisible.

They live in the forest or in human houses. During the day they hide, and at night they come out and start messing up: they damage livestock, break agricultural tools, break dishes and bend spoons, ruffle the hair of sleeping women and send nightmares to people. Sometimes they can attack a woman and rape her.

Folletto anthropomorphic creature hooves hurting people sexual relations with the victim

Folletto

A short creature from Italian mythology. They are from one to three feet tall (0.3-0.9 m), with curly hair and bright eyes, usually wears red. Some of them have goat hooves, while others have no legs at all. They wear caps that give them the ability to become invisible.

They live in the forest or in human houses. During the day they hide, and at night they come out and start messing up: they damage livestock, break agricultural tools, break dishes and bend spoons, ruffle the hair of sleeping women and send nightmares to people. Sometimes they can attack a woman and rape her.

Fullett anthropomorphic creature hooves hurting people sexual relations with the victim

Fullett

A short creature from Italian mythology. They are from one to three feet tall (0.3-0.9 m), with curly hair and bright eyes, usually wears red. Some of them have goat hooves, while others have no legs at all. They wear caps that give them the ability to become invisible.

They live in the forest or in human houses. During the day they hide, and at night they come out and start messing up: they damage livestock, break agricultural tools, break dishes and bend spoons, ruffle the hair of sleeping women and send nightmares to people. Sometimes they can attack a woman and rape her.

Fucker sexual relations with the victim

Fucker

In Korean mythology, the evil spirit of a Japanese, in the guise of a red pepper, appearing at dusk and trying to seduce Korean girls.

The period of the greatest spread of superstitions associated with ebosan begins at the end of the XIX century and continues until the end of the 1940s and mostly coincides with the Japanese annexation of Korea.

Fucker sexual relations with the victim

Fucker

In Korean mythology, the evil spirit of a Japanese, in the guise of a red pepper, appearing at dusk and trying to seduce Korean girls.

The period of the greatest spread of superstitions associated with ebosan begins at the end of the XIX century and continues until the end of the 1940s and mostly coincides with the Japanese annexation of Korea.

Fulgya restless spirit

Fulgya

A ghost from Icelandic folklore in the guise of a person or an animal, haunting a certain person or all people from his family. He could be harmless, but more often he caused various troubles, sometimes even tried to ruin.

Filgya restless spirit

Filgya

A ghost from Icelandic folklore in the guise of a person or an animal, haunting a certain person or all people from his family. He could be harmless, but more often he caused various troubles, sometimes even tried to ruin.

Filja restless spirit

Filja

A ghost from Icelandic folklore in the guise of a person or an animal, haunting a certain person or all people from his family. He could be harmless, but more often he caused various troubles, sometimes even tried to ruin.

Filjya restless spirit

Filjya

A ghost from Icelandic folklore in the guise of a person or an animal, haunting a certain person or all people from his family. He could be harmless, but more often he caused various troubles, sometimes even tried to ruin.

Furaribi a small light at the earth's surface restless spirit the glowing areas of the body wings

Furaribi

This is a creature from Japanese folklore. It appears most often near rivers and looks like a small light in the form of a bird, embraced by fire or glow. The translation of this name literally means "meaningless fire". It is believed that this is an undisturbed spirit whose body was buried without observing rituals.

Furari-bi a small light at the earth's surface restless spirit the glowing areas of the body wings

Furari-bi

This is a creature from Japanese folklore. It appears most often near rivers and looks like a small light in the form of a bird, embraced by fire or glow. The translation of this name literally means "meaningless fire". It is believed that this is an undisturbed spirit whose body was buried without observing rituals.

Fatou a separate part of the body

Fatou

In Japanese and Chinese folklore, people separate their heads from their bodies and fly away on their ears to hunt for insects, and in the morning they come back and attach themselves to the body again.

Flying Head a separate part of the body

Flying Head

In Japanese and Chinese folklore, people separate their heads from their bodies and fly away on their ears to hunt for insects, and in the morning they come back and attach themselves to the body again.

Foot changes form fire with no apparent source flying creature generating a fire creature helps

Foot

In the folklore of north-western Belarus, a kind of house spirit in the form of a flying fiery snake. It can turn into some ordinary object or a living being. Helps with the housework, but can cause a fire.

Flyer fireball out of the landed object sexual relations with the victim turns into a human

Flyer

In Slavic mythology, a creature in the form of a shooting star or a bright fireball (sometimes sparkling), when landing, takes a human form and enters into sexual intercourse with its victims. It appears from the clouds, flies through the air, and, scattering sparks over the roof, penetrates into the house through the chimney.

Fire Serpent fireball out of the landed object sexual relations with the victim turns into a human

Fire Serpent

In Slavic mythology, a creature in the form of a shooting star or a bright fireball (sometimes sparkling), when landing, takes a human form and enters into sexual intercourse with its victims. It appears from the clouds, flies through the air, and, scattering sparks over the roof, penetrates into the house through the chimney.

Fire raid fireball out of the landed object sexual relations with the victim turns into a human

Fire raid

In Slavic mythology, a creature in the form of a shooting star or a bright fireball (sometimes sparkling), when landing, takes a human form and enters into sexual intercourse with its victims. It appears from the clouds, flies through the air, and, scattering sparks over the roof, penetrates into the house through the chimney.

Field Mother anthropomorphic creature helps turns into an animal

Field Mother

In the folklore of Belarus and the north-west of Russia, the female spirit of the field. She looks like an ordinary woman with her hair down. They turn to her to save or return lost cattle. Can turn into a bird.

Field mistress anthropomorphic creature helps turns into an animal

Field mistress

In the folklore of Belarus and the north-west of Russia, the female spirit of the field. She looks like an ordinary woman with her hair down. They turn to her to save or return lost cattle. Can turn into a bird.

Fallaron anthropomorphic creature fish tail

Fallaron

Is the pharaoh a pharaoh, a pharaoh, a phalaron? Creatures from Russian folklore. These are the cursed dead people with a deaf and hoarse magical voice, who are destined to remain in the guise of half-humans and half-fish until the end of the world.

According to a legend known since the XVI century, they descended from the Egyptians who drowned in the Red Sea while chasing the troops of the "Pharaoh fierce" for Moses and the Jews during Exodus. Their horses turned into half-horses, half-fish.

According to the description, they are closest to Western European mermaids.

Foie afraid of sunlight animal body parts anthropomorphic creature induces pregnancy sexual relations with the victim turns into a human turns into an animal water creature

Foie

In the folklore of the British Isles, the general designation of a number of spirits, most often evil and dangerous, closely related to water. They are described as noseless anthropomorphic creatures with a horse's mane, webbed fingers, or with a spiked tail. They can turn into stallions and go out on land in this form, looking for victims, sometimes they take human form and choose their wives among people. The offspring from such a marriage, as a rule, has some flaw — webbing between the fingers, tail or hypertrophied individual parts of the body or face, and also experiences fear of sunlight and cold steel.

Fuat afraid of sunlight animal body parts anthropomorphic creature induces pregnancy sexual relations with the victim turns into a human turns into an animal water creature

Fuat

In the folklore of the British Isles, the general designation of a number of spirits, most often evil and dangerous, closely related to water. They are described as noseless anthropomorphic creatures with a horse's mane, webbed fingers, or with a spiked tail. They can turn into stallions and go out on land in this form, looking for victims, sometimes they take human form and choose their wives among people. The offspring from such a marriage, as a rule, has some flaw — webbing between the fingers, tail or hypertrophied individual parts of the body or face, and also experiences fear of sunlight and cold steel.

Forest devil anthropomorphic creature hairy creature high being hurting people makes you wander the distortion of time the transition to another world turns into an animal

Forest devil

Vorsa (aka vorkul or "forest devil", vora-mort or "forest man", as well as vorys from Komi-Permyaks) — a mythological character of the Komi peoples, a goblin. The Komi-Zyryans considered him an evil spirit, and the Komi-Permyaks had him close to the image of a mighty deity. The pile does not cast shadows, and the echo does not respond to the barking of his dog. 

Outwardly, he looks like a giant with shaggy ears and turned-out heels, but without eyebrows and eyelashes (he was about the height of a pine tree or higher). He does not wear clothes and has transparent bones in his body.

It was also believed that he could come in the form of a whirlwind. You can also see the pile through the outstretched fingers, if you look, bending down, at the howling of the wind between your legs.

The pile can turn into a cat and other small animals.

He can commit various minor dirty tricks against a person, especially if he does not follow the rules of hunting (makes him cheat, steals prey and cattle, etc.), but if he is appeased, he can help.

He will kidnap people. For example, children cursed by mothers, thieves and murderers. At the same time, the passage of time changed for the abducted: in 5 years, it was possible to become a gray-haired old man from a young boy.

Father Pogostny anthropomorphic creature helps to find the lost thing restless spirit sounds without visible sources tanypodinae creature turns into an animal turns into fog

Father Pogostny

The graveyard keeper or the Owner of the cemetery this creature exists in different mythologies under different names. The Slavs called him Batyushko Pogostny, Koshchey Kostyanoy, Host, the King of the Cemetery, Batka, the Owner of the Graveyard, etc. Sometimes it is believed that this is a female being. It depends on the version of origin that the people adhere to. There are several opinions about its origin.

Some believe that he is the first deceased to be buried in this cemetery, and someone, whose he is the personification of all the dead who are buried in it.

Those who adhere to the latter belief believe that he is endowed with reason and stores a lot of knowledge not only about the afterlife, but also the memory of all those buried, which is why they can ask for help. He protects the cemetery.

It can be seen, heard and/or felt for the living. Most often it looks like a gray fog or a clot of black "energy", which can freely change the trajectory and speed of movement, but it may also seem like an animal or a bird.

Fufu anthropomorphic creature fastest thing hairy creature high being large creature

Fufu

According to Chinese beliefs, savages are cannibals with their knees turned back. They have a human face, huge height (more than 3 m), and the body is covered with long hair. The legs of the savages bend in the opposite direction, and they run fast as the wind.

They catch and eat people. Usually the stupid giants of the Xiaoyang country lay in wait for lonely travelers in the mountains, opened their dog's mouth, twisting their huge lips to the forehead, and began to laugh. Having laughed enough, the savages devoured their prey.

Fatu-Liwa flying creature unusual sounds wings

Fatu-Liwa

In the folklore of the aborigines of Australia and Kiribati, a wonderful bird carrying square eggs. Laying an egg, she shouts loudly "Uer!". She can do it right in flight.

Father Xian animal body parts water creature

Father Xian

An aquatic creature from ancient Chinese mythology, a fish with the body of a pig and the head of a carp.

G

Gausinelis choking victim fireball flying creature sexual relations with the victim specifies the location of the treasure

Gausinelis

In Lithuanian mythology, a flying spirit in the form of a fiery serpent, a dragon, sometimes a black crow, a heron, a black or fiery rooster, less often a cat.

He flies over the trees, leaving a trail of fire. It can indicate where the treasure is buried, falling on this place in the form of a star. He can come to women and strangle them at night. Can engage in sexual intercourse with them as an incubus.

According to one version , the word Aitvaras comes from the Lithuanian aiti — tramp, shifty, tomboy and varas — very fast movement. According to another version, the name is associated with the word aitauti — quiet, calm, but this version is less common. The etymology can also be related to the Iranian pativara, as well as the Polish poczwara — an evil spirit, a nightmare.

 

Grandfather anthropomorphic creature changes form choking victim hairy creature helps helps to find the lost thing hurting people predicts the future turns into an animal

Grandfather

The house of the Slavic peoples is called the mythological spirit - the owner and patron of the house. The image of the brownie in the representations of the Slavs is known primarily from folk tales and epics recorded in the XVIII-XX centuries, but a similar spirit is found in the mythologies of different peoples, regardless of the habitat and common beliefs.

As a rule, it is believed that the spirit of a deceased ancestor becomes the patron of the house. This is typical for many peoples: for the ancient Greeks, where the keepers of the house and hearth were called geniuses, and for the Romans, who called the patron gods of the hearth penates, for the Chinese, Slavs, etc.

Among the Eastern Slavs , the house is most often called:

  • by habitat: rus. domovoy, domovoiko, domovoy grandfather, belor. damavik, domnik, khatnik, ukr. brownie;
  • by location in the house: rus. golbeshnik (golbets — partition behind the oven), zapechnik, belor. podpechnik.
  • according to his status in the house and relations with family members: rus. the owner, the izbyan bolshak, the grandfather-brother, the bro, the dobrohotushko, the shaggy hostess; belor. ladies' khazyain, the lord, the biggest, uncle, brother, grandfather, sioiski; ukr. khazyain, did, bogatir,
  • according to the main functions and manifestations: rus. breadwinner, zhirovik, brush, lizun, ukr. gurkalo.
  • according to his belonging to the evil spirit: Rus. dashing, the other half, fat devil, belor. damn damavy, not your spirit, likhadzei, ukr. domoviy, dyabel, unclean.

The names of the brownie can be taboo: rus. himself, he, often with the help of metathesis: rus. modoveyko, modozhirko, ukr. dombeyko.

The corresponding female characters are named: rus. domovikha, modovikha, domovilikha, domakha, mistress.

In Polesie, especially in the west, names characteristic of evil spirits in general were often used in relation to the brownie (domovik): Satan, crafty, evil spirit, filth, enemy, nyachystik, lyakailo, puzhalo, nachnik, unkind soul, dead man, death, "that, shcho pamer", witch doctor, koydunnik.

Synonyms are: Brownie; Brownie; Grandfather; Posten; Posten; Lizun; Domozhil; Owner; Zhirovik; Undead; Susedko; Bratanushko; Guardian Spirit; Abuser of the house; Baked; Podpechnik; Podpolnik; Golbeshnik.

Among the Western Slavs, the brownie was more often represented as a snake and was called domowy, ubożę, stwor, chobold, kobold, kłobuk, karzełek skrzat, inkluz, plonek, latawiec, domownik, stopan, żmij, chowaniec.

  • Czech: Dědek, had hospodáříček, had domovníček (the snake lives under the threshold of the house and brings good luck)
  • Slovak: Domovik
  • Polish: Domowoj, domowik, dziad, vygorishche
  • at luzhichan: nócnénědky

The Southern Slavs:

  • Serbian: domaћi usluzhni duh, maliћ, maciћ, doma,i, škrat or shpiritus. In Bosnia and Banate could be called a "domestic imp" (Serbo-Croatian. kuћni ђavolak)
  • Bulgarian: stopan
  • Croatian: Domaći
  • Slovenian: Domovoj

There are different variants of the origin of faith in the brownie. There is an assumption that it originates from those times when a "construction sacrifice" was laid in the foundation of a new building. Initially they were people, later animals were sacrificed. According to another theory, the idea of the patron spirit of the house appeared as a result of the pagan cult of ancestors.

On the territory of Russia, with the advent of Christianity, the brownie began to be considered a demon, like other pagan deities. To get rid of it, it was necessary to consecrate the house. On the territory of Ukraine and Belarus, on the contrary, the brownie eventually became considered a good spirit sent by God to protect the house. This is confirmed by the ideas about possible clashes of the brownie with the bannik, the goblin and other "evil" spirits.

It is not difficult to guess that most often the hearth is considered the domovoi's place of residence, but it can also live in the red corner, the basement, in the attic and even under the threshold.

The appearance of the brownie, judging by the descriptions of eyewitnesses, can also be different. He usually appears to be a shaggy creature of small stature. Sometimes it has animal features, but more often it looks like an ordinary short person. He can also take the form of any family member (especially absent), an animal (most often snakes, weasels, cats, roosters, rats).

Usually a brownie is considered a male being, but along with the male image of a brownie, there is also a female one. Usually this is the wife (domovikha) and daughter (domovinka) of a brownie.

The brownie often appears in the stories of eyewitnesses in various manifestations:

Noisy spirit. Poltergeist phenomena are often associated with a brownie. According to some ideas, he can slam doors, creak floorboards, scream, groan, talk and even hit and pinch a person. This may be due to both the bad character of the brownie, and the fact that usually a good brownie is not happy with something (swearing, disorder, bad relations with children or animals, etc.). A less popular version explains such phenomena by the struggle of the brownie with an evil spirit trying to get into the house.

The predictor. It is believed that a brownie is able to predict the future to the owners of the house: usually he approaches a sleeping person and leans on his chest so that he can neither breathe nor move, and if at this moment he asks the brownie "for better or for worse?", then he will answer. Scientists explain this condition by sleep paralysis.

Hiding things. Another action closely associated with the brownie is the loss of things. If a person cannot find some thing that is usually lying in a prominent place, then it is considered that a brownie took it. To find a thing, it is customary to say: "brownie-brownie, play and give it away!". Another way is to turn the stool over and tie a handkerchief on its leg. After these manipulations, the thing should be found.

The image of the brownie described in this article refers not only to the patron of the house itself, but also to the patron spirits of other buildings. In the representations of some (mostly living in the north) peoples, the brownie is "divided" into characters-doubles, individual owners of each building or even each functional space of the house (a baking dish, a podpechnik, a golbeshnik - a spirit living behind the stove or under it; an underground worker - a spirit living underground; etc.).

The image described here was deformed under the influence of changes in people's everyday life. So, in private houses, the brownie moves not only around the house, but can also look into the barn, chicken coop, backyard. In the manor houses, the brownie was in charge of all the houses of the farmstead. According to modern ideas, a brownie can live not only in a residential building (each apartment has its own), but also in a garage, shed and even in an office.

Guardian Spirit anthropomorphic creature changes form choking victim hairy creature helps helps to find the lost thing hurting people predicts the future turns into an animal

Guardian Spirit

The house of the Slavic peoples is called the mythological spirit - the owner and patron of the house. The image of the brownie in the representations of the Slavs is known primarily from folk tales and epics recorded in the XVIII-XX centuries, but a similar spirit is found in the mythologies of different peoples, regardless of the habitat and common beliefs.

As a rule, it is believed that the spirit of a deceased ancestor becomes the patron of the house. This is typical for many peoples: for the ancient Greeks, where the keepers of the house and hearth were called geniuses, and for the Romans, who called the patron gods of the hearth penates, for the Chinese, Slavs, etc.

Among the Eastern Slavs , the house is most often called:

  • by habitat: rus. domovoy, domovoiko, domovoy grandfather, belor. damavik, domnik, khatnik, ukr. brownie;
  • by location in the house: rus. golbeshnik (golbets — partition behind the oven), zapechnik, belor. podpechnik.
  • according to his status in the house and relations with family members: rus. the owner, the izbyan bolshak, the grandfather-brother, the bro, the dobrohotushko, the shaggy hostess; belor. ladies' khazyain, the lord, the biggest, uncle, brother, grandfather, sioiski; ukr. khazyain, did, bogatir,
  • according to the main functions and manifestations: rus. breadwinner, zhirovik, brush, lizun, ukr. gurkalo.
  • according to his belonging to the evil spirit: Rus. dashing, the other half, fat devil, belor. damn damavy, not your spirit, likhadzei, ukr. domoviy, dyabel, unclean.

The names of the brownie can be taboo: rus. himself, he, often with the help of metathesis: rus. modoveyko, modozhirko, ukr. dombeyko.

The corresponding female characters are named: rus. domovikha, modovikha, domovilikha, domakha, mistress.

In Polesie, especially in the west, names characteristic of evil spirits in general were often used in relation to the brownie (domovik): Satan, crafty, evil spirit, filth, enemy, nyachystik, lyakailo, puzhalo, nachnik, unkind soul, dead man, death, "that, shcho pamer", witch doctor, koydunnik.

Synonyms are: Brownie; Brownie; Grandfather; Posten; Posten; Lizun; Domozhil; Owner; Zhirovik; Undead; Susedko; Bratanushko; Guardian Spirit; Abuser of the house; Baked; Podpechnik; Podpolnik; Golbeshnik.

Among the Western Slavs, the brownie was more often represented as a snake and was called domowy, ubożę, stwor, chobold, kobold, kłobuk, karzełek skrzat, inkluz, plonek, latawiec, domownik, stopan, żmij, chowaniec.

  • Czech: Dědek, had hospodáříček, had domovníček (the snake lives under the threshold of the house and brings good luck)
  • Slovak: Domovik
  • Polish: Domowoj, domowik, dziad, vygorishche
  • at luzhichan: nócnénědky

The Southern Slavs:

  • Serbian: domaћi usluzhni duh, maliћ, maciћ, doma,i, škrat or shpiritus. In Bosnia and Banate could be called a "domestic imp" (Serbo-Croatian. kuћni ђavolak)
  • Bulgarian: stopan
  • Croatian: Domaći
  • Slovenian: Domovoj

There are different variants of the origin of faith in the brownie. There is an assumption that it originates from those times when a "construction sacrifice" was laid in the foundation of a new building. Initially they were people, later animals were sacrificed. According to another theory, the idea of the patron spirit of the house appeared as a result of the pagan cult of ancestors.

On the territory of Russia, with the advent of Christianity, the brownie began to be considered a demon, like other pagan deities. To get rid of it, it was necessary to consecrate the house. On the territory of Ukraine and Belarus, on the contrary, the brownie eventually became considered a good spirit sent by God to protect the house. This is confirmed by the ideas about possible clashes of the brownie with the bannik, the goblin and other "evil" spirits.

It is not difficult to guess that most often the hearth is considered the domovoi's place of residence, but it can also live in the red corner, the basement, in the attic and even under the threshold.

The appearance of the brownie, judging by the descriptions of eyewitnesses, can also be different. He usually appears to be a shaggy creature of small stature. Sometimes it has animal features, but more often it looks like an ordinary short person. He can also take the form of any family member (especially absent), an animal (most often snakes, weasels, cats, roosters, rats).

Usually a brownie is considered a male being, but along with the male image of a brownie, there is also a female one. Usually this is the wife (domovikha) and daughter (domovinka) of a brownie.

The brownie often appears in the stories of eyewitnesses in various manifestations:

Noisy spirit. Poltergeist phenomena are often associated with a brownie. According to some ideas, he can slam doors, creak floorboards, scream, groan, talk and even hit and pinch a person. This may be due to both the bad character of the brownie, and the fact that usually a good brownie is not happy with something (swearing, disorder, bad relations with children or animals, etc.). A less popular version explains such phenomena by the struggle of the brownie with an evil spirit trying to get into the house.

The predictor. It is believed that a brownie is able to predict the future to the owners of the house: usually he approaches a sleeping person and leans on his chest so that he can neither breathe nor move, and if at this moment he asks the brownie "for better or for worse?", then he will answer. Scientists explain this condition by sleep paralysis.

Hiding things. Another action closely associated with the brownie is the loss of things. If a person cannot find some thing that is usually lying in a prominent place, then it is considered that a brownie took it. To find a thing, it is customary to say: "brownie-brownie, play and give it away!". Another way is to turn the stool over and tie a handkerchief on its leg. After these manipulations, the thing should be found.

The image of the brownie described in this article refers not only to the patron of the house itself, but also to the patron spirits of other buildings. In the representations of some (mostly living in the north) peoples, the brownie is "divided" into characters-doubles, individual owners of each building or even each functional space of the house (a baking dish, a podpechnik, a golbeshnik - a spirit living behind the stove or under it; an underground worker - a spirit living underground; etc.).

The image described here was deformed under the influence of changes in people's everyday life. So, in private houses, the brownie moves not only around the house, but can also look into the barn, chicken coop, backyard. In the manor houses, the brownie was in charge of all the houses of the farmstead. According to modern ideas, a brownie can live not only in a residential building (each apartment has its own), but also in a garage, shed and even in an office.

Golbeshnik anthropomorphic creature changes form choking victim hairy creature helps helps to find the lost thing hurting people predicts the future turns into an animal

Golbeshnik

The house of the Slavic peoples is called the mythological spirit - the owner and patron of the house. The image of the brownie in the representations of the Slavs is known primarily from folk tales and epics recorded in the XVIII-XX centuries, but a similar spirit is found in the mythologies of different peoples, regardless of the habitat and common beliefs.

As a rule, it is believed that the spirit of a deceased ancestor becomes the patron of the house. This is typical for many peoples: for the ancient Greeks, where the keepers of the house and hearth were called geniuses, and for the Romans, who called the patron gods of the hearth penates, for the Chinese, Slavs, etc.

Among the Eastern Slavs , the house is most often called:

  • by habitat: rus. domovoy, domovoiko, domovoy grandfather, belor. damavik, domnik, khatnik, ukr. brownie;
  • by location in the house: rus. golbeshnik (golbets — partition behind the oven), zapechnik, belor. podpechnik.
  • according to his status in the house and relations with family members: rus. the owner, the izbyan bolshak, the grandfather-brother, the bro, the dobrohotushko, the shaggy hostess; belor. ladies' khazyain, the lord, the biggest, uncle, brother, grandfather, sioiski; ukr. khazyain, did, bogatir,
  • according to the main functions and manifestations: rus. breadwinner, zhirovik, brush, lizun, ukr. gurkalo.
  • according to his belonging to the evil spirit: Rus. dashing, the other half, fat devil, belor. damn damavy, not your spirit, likhadzei, ukr. domoviy, dyabel, unclean.

The names of the brownie can be taboo: rus. himself, he, often with the help of metathesis: rus. modoveyko, modozhirko, ukr. dombeyko.

The corresponding female characters are named: rus. domovikha, modovikha, domovilikha, domakha, mistress.

In Polesie, especially in the west, names characteristic of evil spirits in general were often used in relation to the brownie (domovik): Satan, crafty, evil spirit, filth, enemy, nyachystik, lyakailo, puzhalo, nachnik, unkind soul, dead man, death, "that, shcho pamer", witch doctor, koydunnik.

Synonyms are: Brownie; Brownie; Grandfather; Posten; Posten; Lizun; Domozhil; Owner; Zhirovik; Undead; Susedko; Bratanushko; Guardian Spirit; Abuser of the house; Baked; Podpechnik; Podpolnik; Golbeshnik.

Among the Western Slavs, the brownie was more often represented as a snake and was called domowy, ubożę, stwor, chobold, kobold, kłobuk, karzełek skrzat, inkluz, plonek, latawiec, domownik, stopan, żmij, chowaniec.

  • Czech: Dědek, had hospodáříček, had domovníček (the snake lives under the threshold of the house and brings good luck)
  • Slovak: Domovik
  • Polish: Domowoj, domowik, dziad, vygorishche
  • at luzhichan: nócnénědky

The Southern Slavs:

  • Serbian: domaћi usluzhni duh, maliћ, maciћ, doma,i, škrat or shpiritus. In Bosnia and Banate could be called a "domestic imp" (Serbo-Croatian. kuћni ђavolak)
  • Bulgarian: stopan
  • Croatian: Domaći
  • Slovenian: Domovoj

There are different variants of the origin of faith in the brownie. There is an assumption that it originates from those times when a "construction sacrifice" was laid in the foundation of a new building. Initially they were people, later animals were sacrificed. According to another theory, the idea of the patron spirit of the house appeared as a result of the pagan cult of ancestors.

On the territory of Russia, with the advent of Christianity, the brownie began to be considered a demon, like other pagan deities. To get rid of it, it was necessary to consecrate the house. On the territory of Ukraine and Belarus, on the contrary, the brownie eventually became considered a good spirit sent by God to protect the house. This is confirmed by the ideas about possible clashes of the brownie with the bannik, the goblin and other "evil" spirits.

It is not difficult to guess that most often the hearth is considered the domovoi's place of residence, but it can also live in the red corner, the basement, in the attic and even under the threshold.

The appearance of the brownie, judging by the descriptions of eyewitnesses, can also be different. He usually appears to be a shaggy creature of small stature. Sometimes it has animal features, but more often it looks like an ordinary short person. He can also take the form of any family member (especially absent), an animal (most often snakes, weasels, cats, roosters, rats).

Usually a brownie is considered a male being, but along with the male image of a brownie, there is also a female one. Usually this is the wife (domovikha) and daughter (domovinka) of a brownie.

The brownie often appears in the stories of eyewitnesses in various manifestations:

Noisy spirit. Poltergeist phenomena are often associated with a brownie. According to some ideas, he can slam doors, creak floorboards, scream, groan, talk and even hit and pinch a person. This may be due to both the bad character of the brownie, and the fact that usually a good brownie is not happy with something (swearing, disorder, bad relations with children or animals, etc.). A less popular version explains such phenomena by the struggle of the brownie with an evil spirit trying to get into the house.

The predictor. It is believed that a brownie is able to predict the future to the owners of the house: usually he approaches a sleeping person and leans on his chest so that he can neither breathe nor move, and if at this moment he asks the brownie "for better or for worse?", then he will answer. Scientists explain this condition by sleep paralysis.

Hiding things. Another action closely associated with the brownie is the loss of things. If a person cannot find some thing that is usually lying in a prominent place, then it is considered that a brownie took it. To find a thing, it is customary to say: "brownie-brownie, play and give it away!". Another way is to turn the stool over and tie a handkerchief on its leg. After these manipulations, the thing should be found.

The image of the brownie described in this article refers not only to the patron of the house itself, but also to the patron spirits of other buildings. In the representations of some (mostly living in the north) peoples, the brownie is "divided" into characters-doubles, individual owners of each building or even each functional space of the house (a baking dish, a podpechnik, a golbeshnik - a spirit living behind the stove or under it; an underground worker - a spirit living underground; etc.).

The image described here was deformed under the influence of changes in people's everyday life. So, in private houses, the brownie moves not only around the house, but can also look into the barn, chicken coop, backyard. In the manor houses, the brownie was in charge of all the houses of the farmstead. According to modern ideas, a brownie can live not only in a residential building (each apartment has its own), but also in a garage, shed and even in an office.

Ghoul drinking the blood living dead sounds without visible sources unusual sounds

Ghoul

A kind of vampire found in Multan (Moldavia), Transylvania (Semigradje) and Dobrudja, especially often in Wallachia (Southern Romania). 

In appearance, the brucolac seems incredibly swollen, and its skin is stiff and stretched like a drum, and it sounds the same when struck.

Every night he lets out a piercing scream once and whoever responds to this call becomes a victim. To kill a brucolac, you have to chop off his head and immediately burn it in the fire.

Sapkovsky points out that "brucolaks are found not only on Romanian lands, but also in Bulgaria, Greece, and also in Russia, where they are called burdalaks or ghouls."

Gatoblep the harbinger of death

Gatoblep

A creature from folklore Ethiopia. It is a small wild animal with sedentary limbs and a huge head that is constantly lowered to the ground. Everyone who looks into his eyes immediately dies.

Gatoblepa the harbinger of death

Gatoblepa

A creature from folklore Ethiopia. It is a small wild animal with sedentary limbs and a huge head that is constantly lowered to the ground. Everyone who looks into his eyes immediately dies.

Gorgon the harbinger of death

Gorgon

A creature from folklore Ethiopia. It is a small wild animal with sedentary limbs and a huge head that is constantly lowered to the ground. Everyone who looks into his eyes immediately dies.

Grant hooves

Grant

A creature with horns and hooves from folklore The Alps, which lives only in the mountains. 

Since this animal is a mountain animal, its evolution has evolved towards shortening the legs on the one hand and lengthening on the other so that it can stand normally on steep slopes.

There are two types of Dahu — left-sided and right-sided. The first one has shorter legs on the left side, so he can only walk on the mountain counterclockwise. The right-hand side can only go around the mountain clockwise. It is believed that these two subspecies of dahu do not mix in nature, as they meet only face to face. If it still happened that they crossed, from this connection, the so-called "dead dahu" is born, having short legs not on one side of the body, but diagonally, that is, it is either a short front left and rear right, or front right and rear left.

It is believed that the locals joked about the visitors, involving them in the hunt for a "rare" and non-existent animal, forcing them to crawl for hours in an uncomfortable position in the mountains in the wind and freeze in ambush.

Gagoze anthropomorphic creature restless spirit

Gagoze

The ghost of a demon that lived in the temple many centuries ago. He looks like a hideous demon in monastic garb, crawling on all fours.

Gagose anthropomorphic creature restless spirit

Gagose

The ghost of a demon that lived in the temple many centuries ago. He looks like a hideous demon in monastic garb, crawling on all fours.

Gaitrash restless spirit

Gaitrash

In the folklore of Yorkshire, a large ghostly creature capable of taking the form of a dog, horse or goat, a meeting with which promises death. Sometimes his glowing eyes are mentioned.

Gitrash restless spirit

Gitrash

In the folklore of Yorkshire, a large ghostly creature capable of taking the form of a dog, horse or goat, a meeting with which promises death. Sometimes his glowing eyes are mentioned.

Galipot anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood flying creature hurting people the manipulation of the actions of the victim turns into an animal wings

Galipot

The galipot dog is called "lou-garou", from the French word meaning wolf-man.

Lugaru (book), rougarou (French Loup-garou (wolf-werewolf), variants: Rougarou, Roux-Ga-Roux, Rugaroo, Rugaru) is a kind of folklore werewolves, representing a man with a wolf's head or "hybrids" of a man with dogs, pigs, cows or even chickens (usually white).

A flying galipot is called a sangano or sanku. They suck the blood out of sleeping children at night.

They can influence the will of animals and force them to do their errands. And they also have the ability to become invisible.

To become a galipot, you need to make a contract with the devil and sell him your soul for the ability to transform into other beings. A special sorcerer can also help in this matter, if you contact him with an appropriate request. Galipots are known as violent and hot-tempered individuals, extremely strong and insensitive to the use of firearms against them.

You can only kill them with a wooden cross from a tree cut down on Good Friday. Some believe that it is necessary to use a knife or machete, which has been blessed with water and salt.

Galu anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood flying creature hurting people the manipulation of the actions of the victim turns into an animal wings

Galu

The galipot dog is called "lou-garou", from the French word meaning wolf-man.

Lugaru (book), rougarou (French Loup-garou (wolf-werewolf), variants: Rougarou, Roux-Ga-Roux, Rugaroo, Rugaru) is a kind of folklore werewolves, representing a man with a wolf's head or "hybrids" of a man with dogs, pigs, cows or even chickens (usually white).

A flying galipot is called a sangano or sanku. They suck the blood out of sleeping children at night.

They can influence the will of animals and force them to do their errands. And they also have the ability to become invisible.

To become a galipot, you need to make a contract with the devil and sell him your soul for the ability to transform into other beings. A special sorcerer can also help in this matter, if you contact him with an appropriate request. Galipots are known as violent and hot-tempered individuals, extremely strong and insensitive to the use of firearms against them.

You can only kill them with a wooden cross from a tree cut down on Good Friday. Some believe that it is necessary to use a knife or machete, which has been blessed with water and salt.

Galla a small light at the earth's surface fire with no apparent source

Galla

In Sumerian mythology, demons that appeared on earth in the form of radiance moving close to the ground. They were engaged in capturing the souls of the dead.

Gala a small light at the earth's surface fire with no apparent source

Gala

In Sumerian mythology, demons that appeared on earth in the form of radiance moving close to the ground. They were engaged in capturing the souls of the dead.

Gallu a small light at the earth's surface fire with no apparent source

Gallu

In Sumerian mythology, demons that appeared on earth in the form of radiance moving close to the ground. They were engaged in capturing the souls of the dead.

Gargulets glowing eyes large creature scales water creature

Gargulets

An aquatic creature from Polish mythology. He is described as a huge dragon with a long neck, elongated muzzle and glowing eyes.

Garuda animal body parts

Garuda

Garuda (Skt. गरर, IAST: GaruḍA, tib. Khyung, Mkha` lding) is a mythical king of birds in the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, half—man and half-bird.

In Hinduism, the riding bird (with a female body and head) of the god Vishnu, a fighter with naga snakes.

Gaganeshvara animal body parts

Gaganeshvara

Garuda (Skt. गरर, IAST: GaruḍA, tib. Khyung, Mkha` lding) is a mythical king of birds in the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, half—man and half-bird.

In Hinduism, the riding bird (with a female body and head) of the god Vishnu, a fighter with naga snakes.

Gashadokuro anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood high being living dead the bare bones of the skeleton unusual sounds

Gashadokuro

A creature from Japanese folklore. This is a giant skeleton that is fifteen times taller than a man of average height, which consists of the bones of those people who died of starvation. It wanders in the night, baring its teeth, and making terrible noises. It moves so high above the ground, and so quietly, that it can be practically invisible. When attacked, he tears off his head and sucks the blood.

Gasia-dokuro the bare bones of the skeleton

Gasia-dokuro

According to Japanese folklore, a huge skeleton that wanders around the neighborhood in the dead of night. His teeth chatter and his bones rattle with a "gati-gati" sound. If he accidentally meets a late person, he slowly sneaks up, grabs him and bites off his head or flattens him into a flat cake.

Gaikotsu the bare bones of the skeleton

Gaikotsu

According to Japanese folklore, a huge skeleton that wanders around the neighborhood in the dead of night. His teeth chatter and his bones rattle with a "gati-gati" sound. If he accidentally meets a late person, he slowly sneaks up, grabs him and bites off his head or flattens him into a flat cake.

Gayun anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature large creature makes you wander

Gayun

In Belarusian mythology, the forest spirit or the goblin. He looks like a huge old grandfather overgrown with gray moss or a gray bear. All forest animals and birds obey Him. It can take on different guises. 

Gayun has gay granddaughters, funny and playful girls.

Gayevy dzed anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature large creature makes you wander

Gayevy dzed

In Belarusian mythology, the forest spirit or the goblin. He looks like a huge old grandfather overgrown with gray moss or a gray bear. All forest animals and birds obey Him. It can take on different guises. 

Gayun has gay granddaughters, funny and playful girls.

Grove grandfather anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature large creature makes you wander

Grove grandfather

In Belarusian mythology, the forest spirit or the goblin. He looks like a huge old grandfather overgrown with gray moss or a gray bear. All forest animals and birds obey Him. It can take on different guises. 

Gayun has gay granddaughters, funny and playful girls.

Ghoul bloodless victim drinking the blood hurting people living dead turns into an animal

Ghoul

The word "ghoul" in Ushakov's Explanatory dictionary has the meaning "werewolf, fearsome to people, vampire". In many works, the word "ghoul" is synonymous with the term "werewolf", and in the meaning of "ghoul" and "vampire" began to be used not so long ago.

The word itself appeared in the Russian language in the first half of the XIX century. and can be attributed to the number of neologisms invented by writers and poets. This word owes its appearance in the Russian language to A.S. Pushkin. He used a distorted basis of the word "volkolak" (a man turning into a wolf, a werewolf) in an 1835 poem from the cycle "Songs of the Western Slavs".

The image of a ghoul formed by literature represents a revived vampire-a dead man or a person bitten by another ghoul. He drinks the blood of his relatives, the closest people, which is why entire villages are empty. Hunts at night, gnawing the bones of the dead on their graves.

Ghoul anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood hurting people living dead restless spirit unusual eye color

Ghoul

The belief in ghouls was most widespread in the territory of Southern Russia (modern Ukraine). A ghoul roughly corresponds to a vampire in Western European mythology and has much in common with a ghoul in the East Slavic tradition, but even in the XIX century these characters were clearly distinguished.

This is a pawned dead man (continues his posthumous existence on the border of two worlds), rising at night from the grave. He harms people and livestock, drinks their blood, damages the economy, it was also believed that he could cause famine, pestilence and drought.

Outwardly, he differs from an ordinary person with an unusually red face and eyes (redness persists even after death from drinking blood).

It was believed that ghouls were people who were werewolves, sorcerers during their lifetime, or those who were excommunicated and anathematized (heretic, apostate, some criminals), unbaptized children, as well as those who died a violent death, committed suicide, were attacked by a ghoul and one whose body was defiled by an animal.

Grave grave According to legend, ghouls get up from their graves at night and walk on the ground, thanks to their humanoid appearance, they easily enter houses and suck the blood of sleeping people, then, before the third roosters crow, they return to their graves.

According to legend, it was possible to kill a ghoul by piercing his corpse with an aspen stake. If this did not help, then the corpse was usually burned. 

Ghoul anthropomorphic creature bloodless victim drinking the blood hurting people living dead restless spirit unusual eye color

Ghoul

The belief in ghouls was most widespread in the territory of Southern Russia (modern Ukraine). A ghoul roughly corresponds to a vampire in Western European mythology and has much in common with a ghoul in the East Slavic tradition, but even in the XIX century these characters were clearly distinguished.

This is a pawned dead man (continues his posthumous existence on the border of two worlds), rising at night from the grave. He harms people and livestock, drinks their blood, damages the economy, it was also believed that he could cause famine, pestilence and drought.

Outwardly, he differs from an ordinary person with an unusually red face and eyes (redness persists even after death from drinking blood).

It was believed that ghouls were people who were werewolves, sorcerers during their lifetime, or those who were excommunicated and anathematized (heretic, apostate, some criminals), unbaptized children, as well as those who died a violent death, committed suicide, were attacked by a ghoul and one whose body was defiled by an animal.

Grave grave According to legend, ghouls get up from their graves at night and walk on the ground, thanks to their humanoid appearance, they easily enter houses and suck the blood of sleeping people, then, before the third roosters crow, they return to their graves.

According to legend, it was possible to kill a ghoul by piercing his corpse with an aspen stake. If this did not help, then the corpse was usually burned. 

Glashan breaks technique hurting people the little creature

Glashan

A creature from the folklore of the inhabitants of the Isle of Man, living by the roads. He is small and lives in groups. Their main entertainment is to magnetize stones on the side of the road so that cars pull over to the side of the road, despite all the efforts of drivers.

But there is a lot of contradictory information about the creature.

For example, according to another version, Glashtin (glashtyn or Manx: glashtin, glashan, glaistyn, glastyn; IPA /ˈɡlæʃtɨn/) is a creation from the folklore of the Isle of Man. The word glashtin is considered to originate from the Celtic Old Irish: glais, glaise, glas, "stream" or sometimes even "sea". And it was believed that this is a goblin who appears from his water dwelling to contact ordinary people. Some attribute it to the water horses, known here as "kavel-ushtye", which looks like "a gray stallion that goes out to the shores of lakes at night."

Because of such disagreements, many consider the creature a werewolf. The creature takes on the guise of a human from time to time, but betrays its essence, because it cannot hide its pointed ears, like a horse's. In the form of a handsome dark-haired man, he seduces women.

Glashtin breaks technique hurting people the little creature

Glashtin

A creature from the folklore of the inhabitants of the Isle of Man, living by the roads. He is small and lives in groups. Their main entertainment is to magnetize stones on the side of the road so that cars pull over to the side of the road, despite all the efforts of drivers.

But there is a lot of contradictory information about the creature.

For example, according to another version, Glashtin (glashtyn or Manx: glashtin, glashan, glaistyn, glastyn; IPA /ˈɡlæʃtɨn/) is a creation from the folklore of the Isle of Man. The word glashtin is considered to originate from the Celtic Old Irish: glais, glaise, glas, "stream" or sometimes even "sea". And it was believed that this is a goblin who appears from his water dwelling to contact ordinary people. Some attribute it to the water horses, known here as "kavel-ushtye", which looks like "a gray stallion that goes out to the shores of lakes at night."

Because of such disagreements, many consider the creature a werewolf. The creature takes on the guise of a human from time to time, but betrays its essence, because it cannot hide its pointed ears, like a horse's. In the form of a handsome dark-haired man, he seduces women.

Glastin breaks technique hurting people the little creature

Glastin

A creature from the folklore of the inhabitants of the Isle of Man, living by the roads. He is small and lives in groups. Their main entertainment is to magnetize stones on the side of the road so that cars pull over to the side of the road, despite all the efforts of drivers.

But there is a lot of contradictory information about the creature.

For example, according to another version, Glashtin (glashtyn or Manx: glashtin, glashan, glaistyn, glastyn; IPA /ˈɡlæʃtɨn/) is a creation from the folklore of the Isle of Man. The word glashtin is considered to originate from the Celtic Old Irish: glais, glaise, glas, "stream" or sometimes even "sea". And it was believed that this is a goblin who appears from his water dwelling to contact ordinary people. Some attribute it to the water horses, known here as "kavel-ushtye", which looks like "a gray stallion that goes out to the shores of lakes at night."

Because of such disagreements, many consider the creature a werewolf. The creature takes on the guise of a human from time to time, but betrays its essence, because it cannot hide its pointed ears, like a horse's. In the form of a handsome dark-haired man, he seduces women.

Glusun glowing eyes hooves large creature superpowered creature thermal effects on the body

Glusun

An aggressive giant pig from the folklore of Southern Sweden. She has huge fangs, her eyes are burning, and sparks fly from under her hooves. He grunts very loudly. On her back she has a sharp bristle, which forms something resembling a saw blade.

Glusun can be found in the cemetery, but often in other places. Its appearance is described in different ways. It can be black, red, or headless, and can be accompanied by seven or twelve piglets.

The oldest mention dates back to 1587, where he is a harbinger of death.

Glusun is happy to attack someone who performs an annual fortune-telling ritual in order to get information about the future (it was believed that if you walk around on Christmas night, keeping silent and performing a number of certain actions, you can see visions that predicted the events of the next year).

Gloson glowing eyes hooves large creature superpowered creature thermal effects on the body

Gloson

An aggressive giant pig from the folklore of Southern Sweden. She has huge fangs, her eyes are burning, and sparks fly from under her hooves. He grunts very loudly. On her back she has a sharp bristle, which forms something resembling a saw blade.

Glusun can be found in the cemetery, but often in other places. Its appearance is described in different ways. It can be black, red, or headless, and can be accompanied by seven or twelve piglets.

The oldest mention dates back to 1587, where he is a harbinger of death.

Glusun is happy to attack someone who performs an annual fortune-telling ritual in order to get information about the future (it was believed that if you walk around on Christmas night, keeping silent and performing a number of certain actions, you can see visions that predicted the events of the next year).

Glosoen glowing eyes hooves large creature superpowered creature thermal effects on the body

Glosoen

An aggressive giant pig from the folklore of Southern Sweden. She has huge fangs, her eyes are burning, and sparks fly from under her hooves. He grunts very loudly. On her back she has a sharp bristle, which forms something resembling a saw blade.

Glusun can be found in the cemetery, but often in other places. Its appearance is described in different ways. It can be black, red, or headless, and can be accompanied by seven or twelve piglets.

The oldest mention dates back to 1587, where he is a harbinger of death.

Glusun is happy to attack someone who performs an annual fortune-telling ritual in order to get information about the future (it was believed that if you walk around on Christmas night, keeping silent and performing a number of certain actions, you can see visions that predicted the events of the next year).

Glumso glowing eyes hooves large creature superpowered creature thermal effects on the body

Glumso

An aggressive giant pig from the folklore of Southern Sweden. She has huge fangs, her eyes are burning, and sparks fly from under her hooves. He grunts very loudly. On her back she has a sharp bristle, which forms something resembling a saw blade.

Glusun can be found in the cemetery, but often in other places. Its appearance is described in different ways. It can be black, red, or headless, and can be accompanied by seven or twelve piglets.

The oldest mention dates back to 1587, where he is a harbinger of death.

Glusun is happy to attack someone who performs an annual fortune-telling ritual in order to get information about the future (it was believed that if you walk around on Christmas night, keeping silent and performing a number of certain actions, you can see visions that predicted the events of the next year).

Gloso glowing eyes hooves large creature superpowered creature thermal effects on the body

Gloso

An aggressive giant pig from the folklore of Southern Sweden. She has huge fangs, her eyes are burning, and sparks fly from under her hooves. He grunts very loudly. On her back she has a sharp bristle, which forms something resembling a saw blade.

Glusun can be found in the cemetery, but often in other places. Its appearance is described in different ways. It can be black, red, or headless, and can be accompanied by seven or twelve piglets.

The oldest mention dates back to 1587, where he is a harbinger of death.

Glusun is happy to attack someone who performs an annual fortune-telling ritual in order to get information about the future (it was believed that if you walk around on Christmas night, keeping silent and performing a number of certain actions, you can see visions that predicted the events of the next year).

Gravso glowing eyes hooves large creature superpowered creature thermal effects on the body

Gravso

An aggressive giant pig from the folklore of Southern Sweden. She has huge fangs, her eyes are burning, and sparks fly from under her hooves. He grunts very loudly. On her back she has a sharp bristle, which forms something resembling a saw blade.

Glusun can be found in the cemetery, but often in other places. Its appearance is described in different ways. It can be black, red, or headless, and can be accompanied by seven or twelve piglets.

The oldest mention dates back to 1587, where he is a harbinger of death.

Glusun is happy to attack someone who performs an annual fortune-telling ritual in order to get information about the future (it was believed that if you walk around on Christmas night, keeping silent and performing a number of certain actions, you can see visions that predicted the events of the next year).

Gluffsuggan glowing eyes hooves large creature superpowered creature thermal effects on the body

Gluffsuggan

An aggressive giant pig from the folklore of Southern Sweden. She has huge fangs, her eyes are burning, and sparks fly from under her hooves. He grunts very loudly. On her back she has a sharp bristle, which forms something resembling a saw blade.

Glusun can be found in the cemetery, but often in other places. Its appearance is described in different ways. It can be black, red, or headless, and can be accompanied by seven or twelve piglets.

The oldest mention dates back to 1587, where he is a harbinger of death.

Glusun is happy to attack someone who performs an annual fortune-telling ritual in order to get information about the future (it was believed that if you walk around on Christmas night, keeping silent and performing a number of certain actions, you can see visions that predicted the events of the next year).

Gnome anthropomorphic creature hurting people pass the device or knowledge the little creature

Gnome

According to the mythological dictionary, dwarves in the lower mythology of the peoples of Europe are called small anthropomorphic creatures that live most often in the mountains (less often-underground or in the forest, and sometimes it is believed that their homes are hidden in a parallel world connected with ours). The origin of this word is disputed: it is taken from the Latin language from "gēnomos" – "underground dweller", or from the ancient Greek "ΓνώΣη" - knowledge.

Gnomes were popularized (according to another version – invented) by the alchemist Paracelsus in the XVI century, although they were found much earlier in the folklore of European peoples. Paracelsus describes the dwarves as being two spans tall (about 40 cm), extremely reluctant to make contact with people and able to move through the earth's firmament with the same ease as people move in space.

Ideas about such creatures exist in many cultures, but not in all languages they have the name "gnome". For example, the Germans call them "zwerg" ("zwerg"), the British - "dwarf" ("dwarf" in the sense of "dwarf"). From the Old Norse "dvergr" came the old High German "twerg". According to Vladimir Orel, both of these names are derived from the Proto-Germanic "đwerȝaz". In French, dwarves are called "nain", in Italy - "nano", both words from the Greek "vᾶνος" — "tiny". Other European languages have their own words that are not related to any of these roots – Polish "krasnolud", Finnish" kääpiö", Czech" trpaslík " and others. Philological studies also indicate that in the Russian literature of the early XIX century, along with the" gnome", the variant"Karl" was often found.

According to ancient legends, dwarves were originally lower magical creatures, but they were not physically small in stature. The idea of dwarves as creatures of small stature appeared after the spread of Christianity.

The first literary sources where dwarves are mentioned were the Icelandic heroic songs of the 13th century from the collection "The Elder Edda", as well as the text of the “Younger Edda”, compiled by the skald poet Snorri Sturluson, who lived at the turn of the 12th and 13th centuries. Both literary works contain mythological tales of the 8th-10th centuries, as well as elements of the German heroic epic of the early 13th century.

Dwarves are usually considered spirits of the earth and mountains, guarding underground treasures. In alchemy and occultism, they are considered the spirits of the earth as the primary element, and, accordingly, the elementals of the earth. Because of these beliefs, dwarves are often given various supernatural powers, including supernatural skill and wealth.

They describe dwarves in different ways. Their height varies from the size of a finger to the height of a small child. Male dwarves usually wear long beards, and are sometimes endowed with goat legs or crow's feet. Men, dwarves are not very beauty, unlike the dwarf women (called "gnomey").

Description of gnomes in the Book of Fictional Creatures by Jorge Luis Borges:

"Popular imagination imagines them as bearded dwarfs with coarse and comical features; they are dressed in narrow brown caftans and monastic hoods."

According to ancient legends, dwarves, like fairies, love to tease people, but at the same time do them more good than evil. They can present some magical artifact, indicate the place where the treasure is hidden, or fulfill some small request or errand.

In modern culture, dwarves are remembered and loved. They are found in large numbers in fantasy stories of literature, movies, and computer games, and on the lawns of Europeans and Americans you can find figures of garden gnomes installed there as guardians of the earth. At the same time, pop culture has gone far from the original ideas about dwarves and is based rather on the images described in famous science fiction works (which, for example, often contain jokes about female dwarves, giving them a beard, mustache, or simply indistinguishable from the male body structure). These gnomes do not differ much in their behavior from fairies, brownies and other mystical creatures. They are rarely distinguished by any characteristic features other than their height or a caricatured "dwarf" appearance, reminiscent of the aforementioned garden figurine.

Due to the fact that dwarves are seen primarily as the characters of fairy tales along with the fairies (which, however, does not prevent adults, and periodically to meet and even photographed last), witnesses of the dwarves quite a bit, and Yes, those are rarely taken seriously (unlike the witnesses, for example, ghosts or aliens).

Gotoku-neko generating a fire creature

Gotoku-neko

This is a two-tailed cat with a tripod stand on its head, which sneaks into houses when the owners are absent or asleep, sits down in front of a cooled hearth and ignites it with fiery breath using its pipe.

Gotokoneko generating a fire creature

Gotokoneko

This is a two-tailed cat with a tripod stand on its head, which sneaks into houses when the owners are absent or asleep, sits down in front of a cooled hearth and ignites it with fiery breath using its pipe.

Gotokuneko generating a fire creature

Gotokuneko

This is a two-tailed cat with a tripod stand on its head, which sneaks into houses when the owners are absent or asleep, sits down in front of a cooled hearth and ignites it with fiery breath using its pipe.

Grindilow water creature

Grindilow

Creatures from folklore The British Isles. These are aggressive mermaids-aquatic, living in flowing waters. 

Small creatures of green, grayish or "swamp-green" color, which helps them to merge with swamp or lake water, because they live in such overgrown with algae, gloomy lakes or swamps, of course – there is no better place to find. Grindilow's "faces" are quite ugly, the head is crowned with a pair of sharp horns, which, if desired, can make a person or just an enemy very painful. In addition, they have very sharp fangs, and long thin fingers end in the same long sharp yellow claws.

They are quite curious, and it is impossible to say for sure whether grindilows are smart or not, but when it comes to something bad, they have a lot of ingenuity. For example, they are able to sneak up on someone who got lost in a swamp, or swim up to a person in a lake and drag him under water.

In Lancashire, the same evil is known as Green-Toothed Jenny. In other parts of England she is known as Long-Armed Nelly. A relative of grindilow is also the Well Peg, which lives in wells.

Grundilow water creature

Grundilow

Creatures from folklore The British Isles. These are aggressive mermaids-aquatic, living in flowing waters. 

Small creatures of green, grayish or "swamp-green" color, which helps them to merge with swamp or lake water, because they live in such overgrown with algae, gloomy lakes or swamps, of course – there is no better place to find. Grindilow's "faces" are quite ugly, the head is crowned with a pair of sharp horns, which, if desired, can make a person or just an enemy very painful. In addition, they have very sharp fangs, and long thin fingers end in the same long sharp yellow claws.

They are quite curious, and it is impossible to say for sure whether grindilows are smart or not, but when it comes to something bad, they have a lot of ingenuity. For example, they are able to sneak up on someone who got lost in a swamp, or swim up to a person in a lake and drag him under water.

In Lancashire, the same evil is known as Green-Toothed Jenny. In other parts of England she is known as Long-Armed Nelly. A relative of grindilow is also the Well Peg, which lives in wells.

Green - toothed Jenny water creature

Green - toothed Jenny

Creatures from folklore The British Isles. These are aggressive mermaids-aquatic, living in flowing waters. 

Small creatures of green, grayish or "swamp-green" color, which helps them to merge with swamp or lake water, because they live in such overgrown with algae, gloomy lakes or swamps, of course – there is no better place to find. Grindilow's "faces" are quite ugly, the head is crowned with a pair of sharp horns, which, if desired, can make a person or just an enemy very painful. In addition, they have very sharp fangs, and long thin fingers end in the same long sharp yellow claws.

They are quite curious, and it is impossible to say for sure whether grindilows are smart or not, but when it comes to something bad, they have a lot of ingenuity. For example, they are able to sneak up on someone who got lost in a swamp, or swim up to a person in a lake and drag him under water.

In Lancashire, the same evil is known as Green-Toothed Jenny. In other parts of England she is known as Long-Armed Nelly. A relative of grindilow is also the Well Peg, which lives in wells.

Grula anthropomorphic creature

Grula

In the folklore of Iceland and the Faroe Islands, a giant ogre with twenty-four tails, who comes to people once a year before Christmas. Having descended from the mountains, she eats naughty children, those who have not got new woolen clothes for the holiday, or cuts out the stomachs of those who eat meat during lent.

Grila anthropomorphic creature

Grila

In the folklore of Iceland and the Faroe Islands, a giant ogre with twenty-four tails, who comes to people once a year before Christmas. Having descended from the mountains, she eats naughty children, those who have not got new woolen clothes for the holiday, or cuts out the stomachs of those who eat meat during lent.

Gui anthropomorphic creature no shadow restless spirit turns into a human turns into an animal

Gui

In ancient Chinese and Buddhist mythology, the spirit of the deceased, later the common name of demons. Gui looks like a human, but does not have a chin, does not cast a shadow, has the ability to suddenly become invisible, turns into animals and into a human in order to lure an unsuspecting traveler and kill him. In most cases, gui is the soul of the deceased by violent death or suicide.

According to Chinese tradition, "Mogui" or "Mogwai" (Kit. 魔鬼, pinyin: móguǐ; cant.魔怪, mo1 gwaai3) are demons that often harm people. They are said to reproduce sexually, during the mating season caused by the arrival of rains.

Gul-yabani anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature high being large creature unusual sounds

Gul-yabani

In the mythologies of Turks, Azerbaijanis, Kirghiz, Tajiks, an evil spirit living in the steppe or in a cemetery and scaring night travelers.

Gulyabani (Azerbaijani. Qulyabani — "werewolf", from Arabic. hum — "monster-demon", from Persian. yaban — "desert") — werewolf, the lowest evil spirit in the representation of Azerbaijanis (gul-yabans, guli-yabans, biaban-guli), Turks, Kirghiz (gulbiaban), Tajiks (gul, gul-evoni).

According to the beliefs of Azerbaijanis, he has the features of a werewolf, likes to ride a horse at night, tangles her mane, if you catch him and stick a needle in the collar of his clothes, he will work for a person, but will do the opposite. He is hairy and huge (3-4 meters in height), at night he whistles shrilly.

Gulbiaban anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature high being large creature unusual sounds

Gulbiaban

In the mythologies of Turks, Azerbaijanis, Kirghiz, Tajiks, an evil spirit living in the steppe or in a cemetery and scaring night travelers.

Gulyabani (Azerbaijani. Qulyabani — "werewolf", from Arabic. hum — "monster-demon", from Persian. yaban — "desert") — werewolf, the lowest evil spirit in the representation of Azerbaijanis (gul-yabans, guli-yabans, biaban-guli), Turks, Kirghiz (gulbiaban), Tajiks (gul, gul-evoni).

According to the beliefs of Azerbaijanis, he has the features of a werewolf, likes to ride a horse at night, tangles her mane, if you catch him and stick a needle in the collar of his clothes, he will work for a person, but will do the opposite. He is hairy and huge (3-4 meters in height), at night he whistles shrilly.

Gulyabani anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature high being large creature unusual sounds

Gulyabani

In the mythologies of Turks, Azerbaijanis, Kirghiz, Tajiks, an evil spirit living in the steppe or in a cemetery and scaring night travelers.

Gulyabani (Azerbaijani. Qulyabani — "werewolf", from Arabic. hum — "monster-demon", from Persian. yaban — "desert") — werewolf, the lowest evil spirit in the representation of Azerbaijanis (gul-yabans, guli-yabans, biaban-guli), Turks, Kirghiz (gulbiaban), Tajiks (gul, gul-evoni).

According to the beliefs of Azerbaijanis, he has the features of a werewolf, likes to ride a horse at night, tangles her mane, if you catch him and stick a needle in the collar of his clothes, he will work for a person, but will do the opposite. He is hairy and huge (3-4 meters in height), at night he whistles shrilly.

Guli-yabans anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature high being large creature unusual sounds

Guli-yabans

In the mythologies of Turks, Azerbaijanis, Kirghiz, Tajiks, an evil spirit living in the steppe or in a cemetery and scaring night travelers.

Gulyabani (Azerbaijani. Qulyabani — "werewolf", from Arabic. hum — "monster-demon", from Persian. yaban — "desert") — werewolf, the lowest evil spirit in the representation of Azerbaijanis (gul-yabans, guli-yabans, biaban-guli), Turks, Kirghiz (gulbiaban), Tajiks (gul, gul-evoni).

According to the beliefs of Azerbaijanis, he has the features of a werewolf, likes to ride a horse at night, tangles her mane, if you catch him and stick a needle in the collar of his clothes, he will work for a person, but will do the opposite. He is hairy and huge (3-4 meters in height), at night he whistles shrilly.

Grabber changes form fastest thing

Grabber

In Belarusian and Ukrainian folklore, a mythical creature that kidnaps young children and all Jews, regardless of age. Often invisible, but can transform into various people and entities. He moves very fast.

Goat - footed animal body parts anthropomorphic creature hairy creature hooves hurting people sexual relations with the victim turns into a human turns into an animal

Goat - footed

The devil (the same as the devil and is close to the concept of the devil). He has quite a lot of different names, since the name of the demon of hell, the name of the devil was not supposed to be pronounced aloud: Satan, anchutka bespyatny, simply "bespyatny", goat-footed, demon, unclean, evil, cursed, unnamed, enemy of the human race, buffoon, etc. V. I. Dahl and S. V. Maksimov list over a hundred names-euphemisms.

In English, devil. The images of the Baltic Velnyas are close to him (lit. velnias), Shaitan among the Islamic peoples, surt of the German-Scandinavians. For the first time the word was recorded by R. James in the Russian-English dictionary-diary of 1618-1619.

In Slavic mythology, an evil spirit is mischievous, playful and lustful. Under various nicknames and synonyms , he is a character of a huge number of fairy tales Eastern Europe, the most popular character of Russian demonology.

It was believed that the mere mention of the devil was enough for him to hear it and approach an unwary person, or even harm him.

Devils have a generally anthropomorphic appearance, but with the addition of some fantastic or monstrous details. The most common appearance is identical to the image of the ancient Pan, fauns and satyrs — horns, tail and goat legs or hooves, sometimes wool, less often pig piglet, claws, bat wings, etc. Devils are believed to be able to take the form of animals of the old cult — goats, wolves, dogs, ravens, snakes, etc., but sometimes they appear in the form of a human.

Google disproportionate body

Google

A creature from the folklore of the American colonists, resembling an elk, but with perfectly straight legs and a huge upper lip.

Greek breaks technique flying objects hurting people sounds without visible sources

Greek

In Russian folklore, a spirit that makes fun of people (hides things, plays with cattle, makes noise). 

Green - toothed Jenny anthropomorphic creature hurting people water creature

Green - toothed Jenny

A creature from English folklore. Jenny can kidnap children if they are playing near the water, and drag them to the very bottom. The approach of this creature is usually indicated by a greenish foam that suddenly appeared on the calm surface of a pond or other body of water.

Often they scratch their legs with sharp claws until they bleed, or simply frighten with their terrible appearance: long wet hair loose over their shoulders, large green fangs sticking out of their mouths, and very sharp shiny claws.

Green-toothed Jenny (also Evil Jenny, Green-Toothed Ginny; English Jenny Greenteeth, Jinny Greenteeth, Wicked Jenny, Ginny Greenteeth, Jeannie Greenteeth; from the ancient English language "Jenny" — "fair") — a river or swamp witch in English folklore, which probably explained the cruel death of people in reservoirs. It is known in the counties of Lancashire, Cheshire, Shropshire, Yorkshire.

Great Gibbons anthropomorphic creature induces pregnancy sexual relations with the victim

Great Gibbons

In Chinese mythology, ape-like creatures inhabiting the Shu region and abducting women to procreate. Having caught a woman, they take her to themselves and try to conceive a child for her. Those of the women who remain childless are not allowed to return for the rest of their lives. After a while, the woman's mind becomes clouded, and she no longer wants to return. If a woman gives birth to a son, then she is immediately sent home with the baby. Born children are no different from people.

Gangshi fastest thing flying creature hurting people sounds without visible sources the transition to another world turns into a human

Gangshi

In Chinese mythology, a deceased person who died an unnatural death or was left without burial, who became a vampire.

"Jiangshi" is read as ken-si in Cantonese, kyong thi in Vietnamese, Kangxi in Korean, Kensi in Japanese, and Hantu pochon in Malay.

It is usually depicted as an ossified body (depending on the age of death - different stages of decomposition), dressed in official robes of the Qing dynasty, which moves with jumps, arms outstretched.

Jiangshi kills living beings, usually at night to absorb their qi, or life force, while during the day he rests in a coffin or hides in dark places. It glows with a green phosphorescent fire, it has sawtooth teeth and long claws.

Glaishtn animal body parts sounds without visible sources stretches limbs turns into a human turns into an animal water creature

Glaishtn

A water spirit from Scottish mythology in the form of a horse dragging people into the water. Can turn into a man or a horse, can stretch in length as much as you want. Before the storm, you can hear it howling. His hoofprints are backwards.

Goblinay predicts the future sounds without visible sources specifies the location of the treasure

Goblinay

A creature from Welsh mythology that lives exclusively in mines and mines. By knocking on the walls of the mine workings, he indicates to the miners a rich ore horizon or a gold-bearing vein, and sometimes he warns of danger. 

Science explains that this knock can occur from water droplets flowing down cracks into the voids of the rock, and indeed indicate the presence of metals.

Gargettius animal body parts

Gargettius

In ancient Greek mythology, a two-headed dog with a snake's tail.

Grumble animal body parts fastest thing

Grumble

A creature from the mythology of the American lumberjacks-colonists. It is believed that these are the spirits of the first Spanish cattle breeders. The creatures are quite large (about the size of a small horse). They look like a duck with a huge lasso instead of a beak. It emits a sound similar to the "rattle" sound of a giant rattlesnake.

Gamberu spontaneous combustion stretches limbs

Gamberu

It is found in the folklore of the western states of the USA. The creature is practically devoid of wool (except for rare patches of tough vegetation on the chin and thick eyebrows), and his skin resembles rubber in properties (it stretches very much, any weapon bounces off it). It can swallow even a very large animal whole, stretching in all directions. Very flammable.

Girtabli animal body parts anthropomorphic creature

Girtabli

In Akkadian mythology, mixanthropic creatures whose lower body is borrowed from huge scorpions.

Girtablulu animal body parts anthropomorphic creature

Girtablulu

In Akkadian mythology, mixanthropic creatures whose lower body is borrowed from huge scorpions.

Good Shubin anthropomorphic creature glowing eyes hairy creature helps you find your way hooves hurting people makes you wander sounds without visible sources specifies the location of the treasure superpowered creature unusual eye color

Good Shubin

A character of Russian mining folklore, found in Ukraine and especially often found in the Donbass.

This is a miner's spirit, similar to a dwarf, "the owner of the mine" and the patron of miners. he appears in the image of an old miner coughing like an old man, with bright burning eyes, hairy hooves. Shubin likes to joke: scares the miners, suddenly bursting into laughter in the dark, or grabs his leg. He supposedly lives in distant or long-abandoned workings, where he can wander unnoticed. Has great power.

The creature is distinguished at the same time by kindness (warns of a possible collapse), generosity (can show a "profitable place") and at the same time by extreme irritability, malice. Friendly to honest workers, and cruel to arrogant people, especially to the oppressors of miners.

Shubin helps workers trapped in the rubble, but can knock people off the road underground.

Geretva hurting people large creature scales specifies the location of the treasure wings

Geretva

A mystical creature from the folklore of Hungarians and residents of Transcarpathia.

This creature often acts as a treasure keeper, protecting them from prying eyes. Most often he is depicted as a huge scaly dragon or a winged snake, but sometimes he can acquire the features of other creatures, including a demon. It is also believed that this is an evil and dangerous demon that drags hail clouds, eats people and cattle, can even eat the sun, causing solar eclipses.

A shuffle is a huge winged snake, the size of two cows or 12 meters long, which, depending on its age, has four, six, nine or twelve heads. There is such a snake from a runner who has lived for seven years in the desert, where no one has seen him. It is believed that if anyone sees it during this time, it stops growing. Every year during his stay in the desert, sharkani grows one head. These huge snakes live in forests and caves.

There is a version that the Shuffle is blind and does not see where the cloud is going. Therefore, it is led by a special demon — vitrennik. He puts a bridle on the snake and directs it, and consequently, the cloud that it drags on itself, in the right direction.

Grief anthropomorphic creature hurting people

Grief

In Belarusian folklore, an invisible woman without a tongue, eyes and ears. The evil ones look like humpback cats or dogs shod in high boots. They wear hats with earflaps. They are constantly engaged in sabotage and, when they get out from under the stove, they try to quickly make a mess.

According to beliefs, it is very difficult to get rid of Nedoli or evil spirits, but it is possible. To do this, you need to trick them into getting into the bag and throwing it into the swamp. The evil ones can be tied up and left on the road, lured under a stone, buried, etc. They will go to the one who releases them.

The evil spirits - in the mythology of the ancient Slavs - demonic creatures hostile to man, his evil, trouble, who obey the navi. They are invisible and live in the house or sit on the shoulders of a person, bringing misery and poverty.

Gloucester Sea Snake water creature

Gloucester Sea Snake

In American legends there is a mention of a huge monster, similar to a reptile, which was seen in Gloucester Bay. 

The length of the snake according to descriptions ranged from 15.2 to more than 30 meters (50-100 feet), and in girth the snake was about like a "big barrel". She moved in a snake-like manner, although there were other information, and her body was in joints and resembled a string with buoys on them, like on fishing nets.

Goatman animal body parts anthropomorphic creature hairy creature hooves hurting people unusual eye color

Goatman

A creature from the urban legends of the USA. A Maryland monster (or Goatman) roams the Beltsville area and attacks passing cars with an axe.

It is a creature with a human body and goat legs. The creature has long, thick fur growing all over its body. He also has a goat's head with long, twisted horns, and his eyes are red and burning.

Glatissant animal body parts unusual sounds

Glatissant

In Celtic mythology and in European legends about King Arthur, a fantastic beast with a lion's body, a snake's head, deer's legs, made a terrible roar.

Gyuki animal body parts water creature

Gyuki

In Japanese mythology, a kind of water demons-chimeras with a bull's head and spider legs. They exhale poison and love human flesh. Sometimes they work in pairs with other creatures, luring the victim.

Gonakadet water creature

Gonakadet

In the mythology of the Haida Indians (Northwest coast of North America)

Vasgo (Wasgo, Gonakadet, Jig-ik-nak, Sea wolf) is a lake, sea monster with the body of a wolf and the fins of a killer whale.

Tlingit legends say that initially it was a man who pulled on the skin of a slain monster and got the opportunity to live underwater, getting food for the whole tribe, but now he hunts not for people, but for people.

Gvelveshapi water creature

Gvelveshapi

Vishaps (arm. վիշապներ — snake, dragon) — ancient mythological creatures, which were depicted in the form of tall stone statues.

Water spirits from the mythologies of the Armenian Highlands and Near Asia. In honor of them, people carved images out of stone and installed them at underground water sources. Later they became associated with evil spirits and dragons.

Gveleshapi water creature

Gveleshapi

Vishaps (arm. վիշապներ — snake, dragon) — ancient mythological creatures, which were depicted in the form of tall stone statues.

Water spirits from the mythologies of the Armenian Highlands and Near Asia. In honor of them, people carved images out of stone and installed them at underground water sources. Later they became associated with evil spirits and dragons.

Gil-Burnt-Tail a small light at the earth's surface fire with no apparent source flying object helps you find your way restless spirit specifies the location of the treasure

Gil-Burnt-Tail

This phenomenon includes two types of lights:

  • Ground-level (chasing travelers, but not rising above two meters from the road)
  • High (located high above the ground, at the level of clouds)

The first include the classic "Swamp lights" they are also "Will-o'-the-wisps".  They are usually described as "a light that moves by itself not far from the traveler."

They can also be called "lights of Marfa and Saratoga", "Min-Min". These lights intimidated travelers in ancient times, but they are also observed in our time.

The color of such a fire can be blue, yellow, greenish and white. Basically, these lights appear in swamps, cemeteries, sometimes in forests and even less often near reservoirs and fields. They are shaped like a candle flame, but more often spherical. The height of the "flight" is from the ground to the height of a person's raised arm. They move unevenly – they burn for a short time, only a few seconds, after which another one may flare up nearby.

Some legends say that such lights live where violent death has occurred (often more than one).

A small number of legends and eyewitness accounts claim that such lights, on the contrary, help to protect themselves from trouble and even escape.

In almost all corners of the world, since ancient times, there have been various legends about the appearance of phenomena similar in descriptions to Will-o'-the-Wisps.

In Slovak and Czech mythology, a similar phenomenon is called a Harlot. It is believed that these are swamp and water spirits that appear near the water in the form of will-o'-the-wisps.

There are similar lights in England. There they are better known as Jack O'lantem, Body Light or Body Candle.

There is some analogy in the Irish legend about the stingy blacksmith-drinker Jack, who twice deceived the Devil and received from him a promise not to plot against Jack, not to attempt on his body, and also not to claim his soul after death. However, Jack could not use the privileges he received as a drinker, because he soon died. After death, the sinner was not allowed into paradise. Neither God nor the Devil needed Jack. The restless Irishman, waiting for the Day of Judgment, was forced to wander the earth, lighting his way with a piece of coal, which the devil finally threw to him. Jack put a smoldering ember in an empty pumpkin and set off to wander around the world.

If the first option is associated with the souls of the dead, then the second option is tightly connected with the UFO phenomenon.

Now the most famous place for the appearance of such high lights is considered to be the southwest of Queensland in Australia (Alexandria Station). In the USA, the Saragoga and Marfa lights in Texas, the Brown Mountain and Mako lights in North Carolina and the "ghost Hornet lights" in Missouri are also known.

This can also include Fireballs are naked. It is believed that this is a natural phenomenon observed once a year on the river Mekong in Thailand (Isan region) and Laos. It consists in the fact that glowing balls, similar to reddish chicken eggs, rise from the depths of the river. The balls rise 10-20 meters above the river and disappear. The most frequent appearance of fireballs was recorded in October, on the eve of the holiday Pavarana, although they were also observed at other times of the year. In honor of the appearance of balloons in the city A festival is held in Nong Khai and neighboring villages, which together with the natural phenomenon itself attracts many tourists.

It is assumed that the balls appear as a result of fermentation of suspended matter carried by the river, which ignites as a result of certain atmospheric conditions.

Hypotheses

Scientific hypotheses

Among the scientific hypotheses of the appearance of swamp lights , the following can be distinguished:

  • Spontaneous combustion of gaseous phosphorous hydrogen and methane formed during the rotting of dead plant and animal organisms.
  • Bioluminescence, for example, of honey bees or fireflies.
  • Ball lightning
  • The lights of St. Elmo. This is a discharge in the form of luminous beams or tassels (or a crown discharge) that occurs at the sharp ends of tall objects. 
  • A mirage. Jack Pettigrew, a professor at the University of Queensland in Brisbane, believes that these are mirror mirage phenomena from possibly small light sources that are sometimes even hundreds of kilometers away. For example, it may be the reflection of the front and/or rear headlights of cars moving along a remote highway.
  • Perhaps the explanation of the phenomenon may be similar to the cause of the appearance of Fireballs Naked, although they are completely incomprehensible. It is assumed that the balls appear as a result of fermentation of suspended matter carried by the river, which ignites as a result of certain atmospheric conditions.

Scientific hypotheses

There are also a number of hypotheses that are similar to scientific ones on the principle of explanation, but have not found support in scientific circles:

  • The lights are the glow of radioactive fallout
  • Triboluminescence is the glow of gas as a result of the friction of crystalline rocks in tectonic faults.

Mystical hypotheses

The most ancient explanations of this phenomenon are considered mystical hypotheses based on ideas about certain entities living in their own (parallel with us) world:

  • Plasmoids, as a special form of life.
  • The souls of people who died a violent death, and now stuck between worlds.
  • The spirits of the treasure light lights over the hidden treasure to point the way to it.
  • UFO

In the Archive, we will link only those facts with this phenomenon that relate to surface observations.

Result

Authentic Wandering lights (ground lights) appearing in cemeteries and swamps have been explained for a long time - the result of the ignition of phosphine and methane.

Nag fireballs also probably appear as a result of fermentation of suspended matter carried by the river, which ignites as a result of certain atmospheric conditions.

The Min-min light dancing above the horizon, according to the conclusion of the Australian scientist Jack Pettigrew, turned out to be a mirage: the light from the headlights combined with the atmospheric "tunnel" effect (light travels, without scattering, in the layer of cold air between the earth's surface and a layer of warmer air and the curvature of the light rays occurs due to an abnormal distribution of the refractive index.

Givokva anthropomorphic creature excessive thinness hairy creature hurting people living dead sounds without visible sources superpowered creature the manipulation of the actions of the victim

Givokva

In the mythology of the North American Algonquin Indians, the spirit of winter hunger and cold. It feeds on people.

He looks like a tall man in a cape of white matted wool, very skinny, sometimes without the tips of his ears, several fingers, nose or lips. Either completely bald, or very, very shaggy.

It can reproduce any sounds, and its whistle has a hypnotic power, luring a person into a trap. Able to control weather and atmospheric phenomena.

How and where it comes from, no one knows for sure. However, there are several versions:​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌​‌‌‌‌ ​​​‌​‌ ​​‌​‌​ ​​‌​‌‌ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌​​ ​​‌​​​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌‌‌​ ​​‌​‌​ ​‌​​​‌ ​​‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌ ​‌​​‌‌ ​‌​‌​‌​ ​‌‌​‌‌​ ​‌‌‌​‌‌ ​​‌‌‌‌

1. Heroic — in order to avert the threat from the native tribe in a difficult time of trials, the strongest warrior of the tribe sacrifices his soul to the spirits of the forest. So he turns into a creepy monster capable of intimidating any enemy. When the threat to the tribe is eliminated, the monster warrior goes into the deepest thicket, where his heart turns into an ice stone - a man becomes a wendigo.

2. Magical — it is said that the shaman or sorcerer who is excessively addicted to black, harmful magic turns into a wendigo. Some, however, stipulate that for the actual transformation into The Wendigo has a small but very important condition — the sorcerer will not become a monster until he tastes human flesh. It seems that for those who are purposefully looking for such a metamorphosis, this is not the biggest test.​‌‌​‌‌​ Gradually, it becomes more and more ugly, until it turns into a kind of European nosferatu. Angular, tall, skinny and toothy, he wanders through the woods in the hope of devouring some traveler or hunter.

Similarly, the ogre spirit from the mythology of the same North American tribe of Algonquins is also called.

Among the Algonquins, there is a "Wendigo syndrome", when the most ordinary person suddenly begins to feel a craving for eating human flesh.

H

Hutas choking victim fireball flying creature sexual relations with the victim specifies the location of the treasure

Hutas

In Lithuanian mythology, a flying spirit in the form of a fiery serpent, a dragon, sometimes a black crow, a heron, a black or fiery rooster, less often a cat.

He flies over the trees, leaving a trail of fire. It can indicate where the treasure is buried, falling on this place in the form of a star. He can come to women and strangle them at night. Can engage in sexual intercourse with them as an incubus.

According to one version , the word Aitvaras comes from the Lithuanian aiti — tramp, shifty, tomboy and varas — very fast movement. According to another version, the name is associated with the word aitauti — quiet, calm, but this version is less common. The etymology can also be related to the Iranian pativara, as well as the Polish poczwara — an evil spirit, a nightmare.

 

Hal anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Hal

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Halanas anthropomorphic creature hanging Breasts

Halanas

A demonic character in the mythology of the Turkic and some neighboring peoples. It has many names: in the mythology of the Turks, Kazan, Crimean and West Siberian Tatars, Kazakhs, Bashkirs, Tuvans, Altaians, Uzbeks (Albasts, Alvasts), Turkmens (al, Albasses), Kirghiz (Albarsts), Karakalpaks, Nogais (Albasly), Azerbaijanis (Hal, Halanas), Kumyks (Albasly katyn), sbalkartsev and karachayevtsev (almaety) an evil demon associated with the water element.  The Turks also called al, al-ana, al-Kara, al-kuzy, Tuvinians and Altaians - a l would, Kazakhs, Karakalpaks, Kirghiz, Uzbeks - martu (martuu, martuv, martuk), Uzbeks of the Zeravshan valley - Sary kyz ("yellow maiden"), of the West Siberian Tatars - Sary chech ["yellow-haired (maiden)"].

It is usually presented in the form of an ugly naked woman of high stature with long loose yellow hair and sagging breasts. Sometimes the image of albasta was complemented by a third eye and long claws. Less often, the creature looked like a man with a long beard. Although Albasts can also take the form of animals or individual inanimate objects.

Sometimes it was identified with a swamp, a waterbird, a leshach, a mermaid, a devil. 

According to Bashkir beliefs, Albasts are the wandering soul of a person who died as a result of an accident and martyrdom, or was buried without observing funeral rites. For example, he may be a lost soul or the soul of a drowned person.

According to the ideas of most peoples, A. lives near rivers or other water sources and usually appears to people on the shore, combing their hair. It was believed that A. it can cause illness, nightmares, but especially harms women in labor and newborns.

The usual attributes of albasta are a magic book, a comb, a coin. According to legend, having taken possession of his comb, a person can force albasts to serve him and help.

Half - man a small light at the earth's surface unusual sounds water creature

Half - man

The owner of the forest in Chuvash and Turkic mythology.

Perhaps the term "arzuri" goes back to the ancient name of a deity close to the Slavic Shchur. Another name of arzuri is "varman tura" ("forest god") — similar to one of the names of the goblin "Urman iyase" ("master of the forest") among the Kazan and West Siberian Tatars. The southern Chuvash consider Arzuri to be ubede's wife, which is why they also call her "varman amashe" ("mother of the forest"). From the Chuvash languagetranslated as Half - man .

Looks like a tall naked woman with hair to the ground and with a body covered with hair (except for the genitals). She has huge eyes, breasts hanging down (she puts them on her shoulders while walking). Some myths mention three arms, three legs and four eyes (two in front and two behind).

It can change its appearance from human and animal to various objects (branches, a sheaf of hay, etc.) and lights flying between the branches. Scares people with various shouts and laughter. It can attack and maim.

It is considered the restless spirit of a suicide or a person buried not according to the rules.

Arzuri is very afraid of iron, whip, fire, water, dogs and the crackling of cherry trees on the fire. Arzuri likes to ride horses, so you can catch him by smearing the horse's back with resin.

If you meet Arzuri on the way, you have to say: "Uphill!". Then arzuri will fall behind and will not be able to catch up. According to other beliefs, when meeting with arzuri, it is necessary to throw a piece of bread in her direction.

In the mythology of other Turkic-speaking peoples, the Arzuri correspond to the shural of the Kazan Tatars and Bashkirs, and the pitsen of the West Siberian Tatars.

Archaeological sites indicate that the image of Arzuri was widely spread among the Volga Suvaro-Bulgarians.

Housing offices anthropomorphic creature the little creature

Housing offices

In Abkhazian, Ossetian and Adyghe mythology, a dwarf is from a people who lived on earth before the age of humans. Now they live underground and have a very small stature (not visible in the grass). They had a broad chest and powerful shoulders, and were distinguished by great physical strength. They bred small cattle, which were kept in atsanguars, rode hares and milked deer.

Btsentæ is the Ossetian name of atsanov

Zheki — Balkarian and Karachai name of atsanov

Isps and Spi — Adyghe names of atsans

Hakutaku animal body parts pass the device or knowledge predicts the future

Hakutaku

Baijie (kit. trad. 白,, upr. 白,, pinyin: Baí Zé) or Hakutaku (Japanese: 白?) — a fantastic creature of Chinese and Japanese folklore, a mythical chimera with a human face, with six or nine eyes all over her body, possessing exceptional wisdom, understanding human speech and able to foresee the future.

Hone-kujira hurting people large creature restless spirit the bare bones of the skeleton the harbinger of death water creature

Hone-kujira

Bake-kujira, Bake-kujira and Hone-kujira are all names of a creature from Japanese mythology that looks like a ghostly skeleton of a whale.

He swims near fishing villages accompanied by strange, unprecedented and ugly fish and birds.

His appearance portends mass deaths, fires, famine, and so on, the youkai himself can curse some fisherman who sees him, and he, in turn, infects his entire village with a curse.

Howler anthropomorphic creature the harbinger of death translucent unusual sounds

Howler

In Celtic (primarily Irish) folklore, a long-haired ghost woman in a long cloak, whose appearance or cry (moans) foreshadows death. It is believed that she is crying for someone who will soon die.

Usually they wander stealthily among the trees, or fly. They emit piercing screams, in which the cries of wild geese, the sobs of a child and the howl of a wolf seem to merge, foreshadowing the death of one of the members of the genus.

The original term, irl. bean sídhe, consisting of bean — a woman, and sídhe — Shi, which together translates as "a woman from the Sidhe", from the other world.

Along with the generally accepted designation, many areas of the island have their own local names for the banshee, and in some areas of the island, until relatively recently, only the local name was used:

  • So, in the counties of Limerick, Tipperary and Mayo, the name irl. an bean chaointe is common, which literally means a crying woman, a mourner.
  • In the southeastern part of Ireland, the name banshee is derived from the Irish word badhbh (badb), meaning an aggressive, scary and dangerous woman.
  • In the Middle Ages in Ireland, the name badhbh was often called the goddesses of war.
  • In the counties of Lyon, Kilkenny and Tipperary, the name boshenta (boshenta), derived from badhbh chaointe, is common.
  • In Waterford, the banshee is called bibe —baib.
  • In Carlow, Wexford, as well as in the south of counties Kildare and Wicklow, the name bow — bow is common.

According to different versions:

  • the ghost (spirit) of a female mourner, as mourning and sobbing is one of her characteristic features. Some Irishmen believe that if the mourner did not perform her duties properly, then even after death she continues to mourn the dying.
  • the patron spirit of the family that she notifies of death, that is, there is a hereditary connection between them, it can also be the progenitor of the family.

According to the description, this is a woman (young or old) with long white or gray hair, wearing a white raincoat. More often it's just the sound of crying without a visible source. Most often appears at dusk or dark.

Hippocentaur animal body parts

Hippocentaur

In Greek mythology, a creature with a horse's body and a human torso.

Horror-from-the-church-yard anthropomorphic creature changes form hairy creature restless spirit turns into an animal

Horror-from-the-church-yard

A creature from English and Scandinavian folklore. He was considered the spirit of the church. He could appear in the form of a black dog or a small dark-skinned man.

Herestuns anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood fastest thing living dead superpowered creature

Herestuns

Russian graves In Belarusian and Russian mythology, a deceased sorcerer or witch doctor who gets up from the grave at midnight and walks around the neighborhood until the first cocks. Can develop a high speed. Has great power. Can attack people and drink blood.

Heretics anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood fastest thing living dead superpowered creature

Heretics

Russian graves In Belarusian and Russian mythology, a deceased sorcerer or witch doctor who gets up from the grave at midnight and walks around the neighborhood until the first cocks. Can develop a high speed. Has great power. Can attack people and drink blood.

Halone animal body parts

Halone

Garuda (Skt. गरर, IAST: GaruḍA, tib. Khyung, Mkha` lding) is a mythical king of birds in the Hindu and Buddhist traditions, half—man and half-bird.

In Hinduism, the riding bird (with a female body and head) of the god Vishnu, a fighter with naga snakes.

Hungry Skeleton anthropomorphic creature drinking the blood high being living dead the bare bones of the skeleton unusual sounds

Hungry Skeleton

A creature from Japanese folklore. This is a giant skeleton that is fifteen times taller than a man of average height, which consists of the bones of those people who died of starvation. It wanders in the night, baring its teeth, and making terrible noises. It moves so high above the ground, and so quietly, that it can be practically invisible. When attacked, he tears off his head and sucks the blood.

Hair anthropomorphic creature choking victim hairy creature hurting people

Hair

In Belarusian mythology, a domestic spirit that looks like a small anthropomorphic creature with dark thick and long hair. He has big seven-fingered palms with long nails. He scratches and tickles men's noses. Women and girls - grabs their breasts or leans on them with his whole body, making it difficult to breathe, shaggy hair. He scares children by tickling their heels.

Hakaturi changes form

Hakaturi

In Maori mythology, nature spirits capable of taking the form of birds and insects.

Hal animal body parts

Hal

A creature from medieval bestiaries the size of a hippopotamus, an elephant's tail, boar's jaws and movable horns, with which he attacks alternately in battle. The color is black or red.

Hanako-san anthropomorphic creature restless spirit

Hanako-san

The restless spirit, the ghost of Japan's school toilets. It is believed that this is a girl who died during an air raid on a school when she was playing hide-and-seek with her friends, or the restless spirit of a young girl who died at the hands of a rapist father or some other psychopathic maniac who found her hiding in the toilet.

Hanako Toilet anthropomorphic creature restless spirit

Hanako Toilet

The restless spirit, the ghost of Japan's school toilets. It is believed that this is a girl who died during an air raid on a school when she was playing hide-and-seek with her friends, or the restless spirit of a young girl who died at the hands of a rapist father or some other psychopathic maniac who found her hiding in the toilet.

Hannya anthropomorphic creature

Hannya

In Japanese folklore, women are demons who appear on the stage of the theater.

Honnari hannya anthropomorphic creature

Honnari hannya

In Japanese folklore, women are demons who appear on the stage of the theater.

Hapun changes form fastest thing

Hapun

In Belarusian and Ukrainian folklore, a mythical creature that kidnaps young children and all Jews, regardless of age. Often invisible, but can transform into various people and entities. He moves very fast.

Heck animal body parts anthropomorphic creature hairy creature hooves hurting people sexual relations with the victim turns into a human turns into an animal

Heck

The devil (the same as the devil and is close to the concept of the devil). He has quite a lot of different names, since the name of the demon of hell, the name of the devil was not supposed to be pronounced aloud: Satan, anchutka bespyatny, simply "bespyatny", goat-footed, demon, unclean, evil, cursed, unnamed, enemy of the human race, buffoon, etc. V. I. Dahl and S. V. Maksimov list over a hundred names-euphemisms.

In English, devil. The images of the Baltic Velnyas are close to him (lit. velnias), Shaitan among the Islamic peoples, surt of the German-Scandinavians. For the first time the word was recorded by R. James in the Russian-English dictionary-diary of 1618-1619.

In Slavic mythology, an evil spirit is mischievous, playful and lustful. Under various nicknames and synonyms , he is a character of a huge number of fairy tales Eastern Europe, the most popular character of Russian demonology.

It was believed that the mere mention of the devil was enough for him to hear it and approach an unwary person, or even harm him.

Devils have a generally anthropomorphic appearance, but with the addition of some fantastic or monstrous details. The most common appearance is identical to the image of the ancient Pan, fauns and satyrs — horns, tail and goat legs or hooves, sometimes wool, less often pig piglet, claws, bat wings, etc. Devils are believed to be able to take the form of animals of the old cult — goats, wolves, dogs, ravens, snakes, etc., but sometimes they appear in the form of a human.

Hell hound animal body parts large creature

Hell hound

Cerberus (Kerber) a three-headed dog of enormous size from Greek mythology. In some descriptions it has body parts of other animals: crocodile head, hippopotamus croup, snake heads, etc.

Hellhound fastest thing glowing eyes hairy creature high being the harbinger of death translucent unusual eye color

Hellhound

A supernatural being in the form of a dog. It first appears in Greek mythology, and then passes into Northern European folklore. The earliest mention of hellhounds is found in De nugis curialium (1190) Walter Map and the Welsh cycle of mythology The Four branches of the Mabinogi (ca. X—XII centuries).

Hellhound is the English spelling of the name of hellhounds.

Most often it is described as a huge black (sometimes with brown spots) dog with glowing red or yellow eyes, very strong and fast, having a ghostly or phantom essence and an unpleasant smell, and sometimes even the ability to speak.

They are often tasked with guarding the entrance to the world of the dead or performing other duties related to the afterlife or the supernatural world, such as hunting for lost souls and guarding supernatural things.

Sometimes it is used as a collective name for demonic dogs.

Hellhound fastest thing glowing eyes hairy creature high being the harbinger of death translucent unusual eye color

Hellhound

A supernatural being in the form of a dog. It first appears in Greek mythology, and then passes into Northern European folklore. The earliest mention of hellhounds is found in De nugis curialium (1190) Walter Map and the Welsh cycle of mythology The Four branches of the Mabinogi (ca. X—XII centuries).

Hellhound is the English spelling of the name of hellhounds.

Most often it is described as a huge black (sometimes with brown spots) dog with glowing red or yellow eyes, very strong and fast, having a ghostly or phantom essence and an unpleasant smell, and sometimes even the ability to speak.

They are often tasked with guarding the entrance to the world of the dead or performing other duties related to the afterlife or the supernatural world, such as hunting for lost souls and guarding supernatural things.

Sometimes it is used as a collective name for demonic dogs.

Hidarugami restless spirit the harbinger of death

Hidarugami

Spirits from Japanese folklore. "Hidarugami" (Hidarugami) roughly translates as "hungry gods". Depending on the region, hidarugami can be called with the words "hidarutami" or "darashi" or "daru", but their behavior is the same.

It is believed that these are the souls of those who died of starvation, lost in the mountains, and whose bodies were never found. They wander in search of someone with whom they can share their agony of eternal hunger.

They attack travelers walking along lonely mountain paths. The victims are suddenly overcome by an insatiable feeling of hunger, the like of which they have never experienced. This feeling is almost irresistible and is often accompanied by inexplicable fatigue and numbness of the limbs, as a result of which the victims of the attack of the "hungry ghost" fall to the ground, not understanding what is happening. If the traveler is not helped in time, it will almost certainly lead to his death or a state of complete insanity, and after his death the traveler will become the same hungry ghost.

Hidarutami restless spirit the harbinger of death

Hidarutami

Spirits from Japanese folklore. "Hidarugami" (Hidarugami) roughly translates as "hungry gods". Depending on the region, hidarugami can be called with the words "hidarutami" or "darashi" or "daru", but their behavior is the same.

It is believed that these are the souls of those who died of starvation, lost in the mountains, and whose bodies were never found. They wander in search of someone with whom they can share their agony of eternal hunger.

They attack travelers walking along lonely mountain paths. The victims are suddenly overcome by an insatiable feeling of hunger, the like of which they have never experienced. This feeling is almost irresistible and is often accompanied by inexplicable fatigue and numbness of the limbs, as a result of which the victims of the attack of the "hungry ghost" fall to the ground, not understanding what is happening. If the traveler is not helped in time, it will almost certainly lead to his death or a state of complete insanity, and after his death the traveler will become the same hungry ghost.

Hitoban a separate part of the body

Hitoban

In Japanese and Chinese folklore, people separate their heads from their bodies and fly away on their ears to hunt for insects, and in the morning they come back and attach themselves to the body again.

Hitodama a small light at the earth's surface makes you wander restless spirit

Hitodama

In Japanese folklore, the souls of the recently deceased take the form of mystical lights. They are also known as onibi (demonic lights").

It is assumed that such lights are pale blue or green spheres with long tails. It is usually said that hitodama appears in summer, near cemeteries, gloomy forests or next to a dying person, as a manifestation of the soul leaving the body (although some say that they saw these lights just before the birth of a child).

Most of the hitodams go out or fall to the ground shortly after people notice them, although it is believed that they lead travelers off the right path and make them get lost.

Perhaps they were mistaken for these fluorescent gas, which sometimes appeared over the graves.

Hito-lady a small light at the earth's surface makes you wander restless spirit

Hito-lady

In Japanese folklore, the souls of the recently deceased take the form of mystical lights. They are also known as onibi (demonic lights").

It is assumed that such lights are pale blue or green spheres with long tails. It is usually said that hitodama appears in summer, near cemeteries, gloomy forests or next to a dying person, as a manifestation of the soul leaving the body (although some say that they saw these lights just before the birth of a child).

Most of the hitodams go out or fall to the ground shortly after people notice them, although it is believed that they lead travelers off the right path and make them get lost.

Perhaps they were mistaken for these fluorescent gas, which sometimes appeared over the graves.

Hone-onna anthropomorphic creature it feeds on life energy restless spirit sexual relations with the victim

Hone-onna

In Japanese mythology, the ghost of a woman in love, sucking the life force out of her lover.

This ghost appears the same as it was in life: a young woman in the prime of her life and beauty. And only those whose eyes are not clouded by love, or true believers can see through the mask of her true image: a rotting, fetid skeleton that has risen from the dead.

At night, hone-onna gets up from the grave and goes to her lover's house. Every night, hone-onna sucks the life force out of the beloved, and he becomes weaker and weaker. If this is not prevented, then in the end he will die and join his mistress in the arms of death.

Hone-Onna anthropomorphic creature it feeds on life energy restless spirit sexual relations with the victim

Hone-Onna

In Japanese mythology, the ghost of a woman in love, sucking the life force out of her lover.

This ghost appears the same as it was in life: a young woman in the prime of her life and beauty. And only those whose eyes are not clouded by love, or true believers can see through the mask of her true